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Question: On the Interceptor, when Jack swings back from the Black Pearl, he asks Elizabeth where the medallion is, and in reply she tries to slap him, saying 'Wretch!' Why? What has he ever done to her? Okay, Jack used her to escape from Norrington and his men, but he saved her life before that, so it's only fair.

benjyrabbit

Answer: She calls him a wretch because after his escape all he asks about is the medallion, which she overheard the pirates talking about. It is fairly logical to presume she thought he was trying to use the medallion to his advantage. Which is right.

Chosen answer: She says "fetch" not "wretch" and pretends to throw the coin, not slap him. He catches her hand, sees no coin and then asks where William is, because Will is the one that should be in possession of the coin since it was originally his can remove the curse.

Question: When does Stan Lee make his cameo in this movie?

Awesomo

Chosen answer: Very early on, as Stark's leaving the Expo, Lee appears ahead of Stark, dressed as television interviewer Larry King - Stark even greets him as "Larry" as he passes by.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: When Elizabeth tries to board the Black Pearl at Tortuga, Jack is extremely unwilling to let her on. I know there's the element of what he has done to Will, but why doesn't he just let her on, and trade her as one of the 99 souls he needs? I mean, if he can leave Will on the Flying Dutchman to serve for a hundred years in his place, why can't he do it to Elizabeth?

benjyrabbit

Chosen answer: Jack is reluctant to have her on board because he knows she has her own agenda (to save Will) that could upset his plans. He is aware that Elizabeth is intelligent, strong-willed, and determined. She knows better than anyone how Jack operates, and would use any advantage to achieve her goal. It is only when Jack realizes that Elizabeth can lead him to the Dead Man’s Chest, that he allows her to join his crew. Also, having any woman on board a ship creates its own set of problems, and Jack, in particular, could be distracted by her. It's also questionable as to whether or not Davy Jones accepts female souls aboard his ship, as none have been seen. Jack may also feel enough loyalty to Elizabeth to want to spare her from that fate. He did try to retrieve Will as part of his bargain with Jones. Of course, Jack knows it is unlikely that he can collect enough souls by the deadline, and his intent is to find the Dead Man’s Chest so he can control Davy Jones, thus relieving him of his debt and controlling all the seas.

raywest Premium member

Question: In At World's End, Jack and Beckett are hammering out a deal on the Endeavour, and Jack says Beckett can have Barbossa, Will, Pintel, Ragetti etc. but fails to mention Elizabeth, at which point Beckett asks, 'And what about Miss Swann?' and Jack answers, 'Of what interest is she to you?' Does this mean he still likes Elizabeth (even though she left him to die in Dead Man's Chest, and their relationship in this film is obviously frosty)? Did I miss something? Is Jack pulling some trick?

benjyrabbit

Chosen answer: Well, Jack has no intention of allowing Beckett to have Will or any of the others, except maybe Barbossa. Elizabeth, he is simply more hesitant to risk the way he is risking the others. He does not "like" her nor have "feelings" for her. However, in Dead Man's Chest, at some point, it was just implied that Jack did have an interest in her at the same time Elizabeth was in denial of her interest in him. That was when they were coming at each other talking about "curiosity." There was one point they were interested in each other.

Phixius Premium member

Question: Do the real Mr. and/or Mrs. Tuohy have a cameo in this film?

Chosen answer: Just the photographs during the closing credits.

Phixius Premium member

Question: During the dinner scene Jack throws something at Cal, and then later on in the scene Cal throws it back. What were they throwing?

elkid

Chosen answer: A box of matches. At 1:03:10, Cal is seen putting a cigarette in his mouth and then patting his coat pockets looking for a match to light it with.

Jeff Swanson

Show generally

Question: Can someone tell me who makes all the shirts for this show? Many of them are in the same type and bear nonsensical phrases like "Psycho Penguins" or "My Cheese, My Rules". If someone can tell me where to buy these shirts, I'd really appreciate it.

Brad Premium member

Chosen answer: They are made for the show. Dan Schnider, creator of the show, calls them "Penny Tees".

Question: For those of you who have the DVD, what is the name of the song that plays in the TV spot "Get Ready"?

Brad Premium member

Chosen answer: "I want to leave you far behind" by Lunatic Calm.

Grumpy Scot

Question: When Slugworth is trying to bribe Charlie into bringing him the Everlasting Gobstopper, he says that his reward will be "10,000 of these" as he shows Charlie a bunch of money. Does anyone know what "those" were and how much "they" were worth? They look too big to be American dollars.

Paul Pepiton Premium member

Chosen answer: The story itself is purposely set in a fictional European country (accordingly to the DVD's audio commentary), so no real town or city can be identified (keeping the cities anonymity). Coupled with the fact that Willy Wonka IS a fantasy, the money offered to Charlie by Slugworth is of a non-descript denominational currency used in that country. It can be safely assumed that it was a very large sum of money.

CCARNI Premium member

Question: This question is more based on the soundtrack of the movie. After comparing the soundtrack CD to the music scores in the movie, I noticed there's some moments where the music is only heard in the movie, such as when we're first introduced to the floating mountains or the flute music that plays when Jake learns to ride on the direhorse. My questions are: Why were these left out of the soundtrack? And where can I find similar tracks to these? Not exact tracks, in case I can't find them, but similar music.

Chosen answer: Simply put, there is only a finite amount of storage space on a CD and something's got to give, so the composer and James Cameron decide what stays and what goes. As for finding similar music, one of the many criticisms of the Avatar soundtrack is that certain parts of it sound too much like other James Horner soundtracks. For instance when Neytiri is in the battlefield looking bewildered as people and animals are dying around her, many of the musical cues are a direct lift from Horner's other composition for Enemy at the Gates, and this is not an isolated case either.

GalahadFairlight

Question: Wouldn't it have made more sense in having Hickox and the two German Basterds pose as a camera man and his assistants instead of wearing Nazi officer uniforms when they met Bridget in the bar? I would think that an officer would draw more attention than civilians. Civilians wouldn't have been that strange a sight in a bar in France, would it? And if they were asked any questions about their purpose for being in France, Hickox could have been more convincing since he was the film buff. The other two could have played along as Hickox did most of the talking anyway, or am I missing something?

Chosen answer: The Basterds did not know anything about Hammersmark's plan to smuggle them in as camera crew. They did not speak to her before (this is the first time they see her). It is also mentioned later that the German speaking Basterds are known to slip into German uniforms, so I guess they had some of those lying around, as opposed to normal camera-crew outfits (they are soldiers in enemy territory after all).

Question: Is there a scene in the movie where we see Everett find the gold watch in the drawer while he is looking for a hairnet? It's not on the dvd and I am sure I have seen it. My family says they have never seen it so it's driving me crazy.

Chosen answer: I too recall that scene.

Phixius Premium member

Question: How come in the scene where Kirk rescues Captain Pike from on board the Narada, Pike appears to be able to move fine with only some assistance from Kirk, but at the scene at the end he is in a wheelchair?

Chosen answer: The wheelchair may well be just a temporary measure. While Pike's able to move with Kirk's assistance, he's clearly not enjoying the experience, but, given that it's get moving or stay on a doomed ship, he just has to go for it. Even with the advanced medical technology available to them, it's not unreasonable that he wouldn't be back to normal immediately, and thus using a wheelchair for the time being is a sensible move, rather than continuing to move under his own power and risk damaging things further.

Tailkinker Premium member

Show generally

Question: I noticed in the Fred episode at the end when everyone in the cast's voice was sped up, Carly's wasn't. Her voice still sounded normal. Does anyone know why that is?

Chosen answer: Her voice IS sped up.

Question: When Abe or the Princess are in the library, (but I can't remember if they are together) what is the name/author of the poem they are reading?

Chosen answer: "In Memoriam" by Alfred Lord Tennyson.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: If I'm correct, Carrie's mother (in both the movie and book) believes that Carrie had her period as a sign of some sin. However, the Bible itself has verses that mention periods. Being a religious fanatic who has most likely read the Bible several times, why isn't Carrie's mother aware of menstruation being natural?

Chosen answer: Carrie's mother is not just a fanatic, she is also completely insane. To her, menstruation is a sign of Original Sin, the one committed by Eve in the Garden of Eden, and a mark that all women (and men!) are sinful in themselves.

Twotall

Question: Wouldn't the city have found out that someone was using the hotel when there was electricity being used but no-one to pay for it?

Chosen answer: Not until there's a 3 month period where the electricity usage is much higher than normal. Even then, it takes another few months to get it noticed, and another couple of months to send someone out to investigate it.

rswarrior

Question: I was just wondering if in America (or any other countries) the film is called 'twenty-twelve' or 'two thousand and twelve'? Here in England it's 'twenty twelve', it had never occurred to me it might be different elsewhere but in the commentary the director calls it 'two thousand and twelve'.

Chosen answer: I live in America (Florida) and we said twenty-twelve. All the media I heard said twenty-twelve. There is actually some debate going on in America (or at least Florida) about whether or not we should say twenty-ten or two thousand ten.

shortdanzr Premium member

Question: After Paulie is shot, Clemenza says, "Leave the gun, take the cannoli." Do the two men then walk home, catch a cab, take a bus?

stella01

Chosen answer: No. Everything was pre-arranged, and the entire trip was a ruse solely to execute Paulie for his part in setting up the hit on Don Corleone. Clemenza had Paulie drive them in Paulie's car on the pretense of looking for apartments to house Corleone "soldiers" in the event of a gang war. He directed him to drive and then stop at that specific isolated location where Rocco shot him. Another car is waiting nearby to pick up Clemenza and Rocco.

raywest Premium member

Question: This question is sort of across the whole trilogy: If the elves are immortal (or, as I think someone pointed out, they just age very very slowly) but they still have children, (various elf family trees confirm this), how is it that Middle Earth isn't overrun by them?

Chosen answer: Elves aren't prone to churning out the kids - they breed very infrequently. Elrond, who's been around for six thousand years, has only had three children in that time period. Galadriel and Celeborn, whose marriage dates back even further than that, have only had one (Celebrian, Elrond's wife). While elf lifespans are sufficiently long that they can be considered effectively immortal, they do die in accidents or wars. Plus others (including the aforementioned Celebrian) have gone into the West. Put all that together, and it does a good job of keeping the elven population of Middle-Earth down to reasonable levels.

Tailkinker Premium member

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