Questions about specific movies, TV shows and more

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Question: What exactly did it take to get Norman to become brave and more willing to fight?

Answer: Although he starts out afraid, awkward and hesitant, Norman gradually becomes battle-hardened throughout the film. But there is one event that probably changes Norman more than anything: When his one-night love interest, Emma, is killed during a German attack. After that, the tank crew realises that Norman has changed, become harder and more focused, and they finally accept him as a team member with the nickname "Machine."

Charles Austin Miller

Question: In the scene leading up to where the mirror is knocked off and the car stalls, there appears to be a billboard in the background with a cowboy with his head in profile. In large letters above it is what appears to be the word "Impotent." (Not "Important"). Does anyone know what is with that?

Answer: That billboard was part of an anti-smoking campaign from about 18 years ago. The image mocks the iconic Marlboro Man, with the cigarette in his mouth flaccid and drooping. The word "Impotent" is rendered large in the same type style as the old Marlboro logo. In much smaller text (not visible in the film), the sign reads, "WARNING: Smoking Causes Impotence."

Charles Austin Miller

Chosen answer: No, he did not have any knowledge regarding that. Luke or Leia would have told him at some point after Vader's death, but that is not shown in the film.

raywest

Considering Leia's aghast reaction to Luke's explanation on Endor ("Your father!"), he hadn't mentioned it to her before, and I can't possibly believe he would tell anyone else before her. (On a side note, it amuses me to wonder just how long it took before Leia put two-and-two together about what this all means about HER father; the implications don't seem to have hit her before this scene is over).

TonyPH

Question: There was a deleted scene where the Slytherins escape in the dungeons. Where did the Slytherins go after they escaped? Did they fight? If so, which side? And who blew up that dungeon door?

DFirst1

Answer: It's not shown who specifically blew open the door, and it probably was more than one student working together. It's also not shown where the Slytherin students went after escaping the dungeon. Most likely, they scattered. The younger ones or those students whose families had no allegiance to the Dark Lord, were probably hiding in their common room. Older students, whose parents were Death Eaters or Voldemort followers, would probably join the Slytherin ranks outside the castle.

raywest

I am sure that there are also Slytherins whose parents are not Death Eaters who battled alongside Hogwarts side.

DFirst1

Chosen answer: I don't think that the Slytherins are all sons and daughters of the death eaters. Most likely, they were the reinforcements who collected by Slughorn. But it was off screen. Perhaps the one who blew up the cage door is Draco. Without the deleted scene, it was obvious that the Slytherin escaped. Because later on Crabbe and Zabini were accompanied by Malfoy in the room of requirement.

Chosen answer: Most likely. It wasn't a secret, who Dooku was before he turned to the dark side is common knowledge to the Jedi.

BaconIsMyBFF

Question: Vampires can never kill their own kind or it would result in the vampire's death but isn't locking Claudia and the vampire woman in the room and letting the sun destroy them technically the same thing as killing them? She "killed" Lestat and her and the vampire woman were thrown into a room where the sun would rise and burn them to death so, in a way, aren't any of Armand's followers killing their own kind?

Answer: It's a matter of technicality. Killing one's own, as in committing murder, would be a different scenario than executing someone for a crime. That seems to be the case here.

raywest

Question: Lonnegan killed the Currier and Luther, and was trying to kill Hooker. How come nobody was looking for Joe Erie? even Snyder knew he was involved.

Bob j

Chosen answer: Snyder only knew that Erie was friends with Hooker, and he wasn't on Lonnegan's payroll, just a run-of-the-mill corrupt policeman, so he didn't know Erie was involved. The Courier barely saw Erie and so may not have been able to identify him as well as he did Hooker and Luther, so Erie was unknown to Lonnegan.

Question: How does Samara know the phone number when the person finishes watching the tape?

Answer: It is never explicitly stated, however Samara is a supernatural entity so the answer is "magic".

BaconIsMyBFF

Question: Is it possible to stop your heart as it seems that James Bond did in this film when he is in hospital, or not? My partner believes that it's not possible.

Answer: Consciously slowing one's own heart rate to barely beating (usually performed by a mystical guru-type character in film or literature) is a myth. It is possible to slightly slow the heartbeat with meditation and relaxation, but completely stopping and restarting it is impossible.

raywest

Chosen answer: Sheldon would certainly check the contract for a signature afterwards. Sheldon also notarizes every contract he writes or signs.

Greg Dwyer

Answer: In a situation where he wants to get his own way, he turns to the roommate agreement and for this situation would see an empty space.

Chosen answer: Penny's reply was "wait, you're inviting people to our wedding?" Most people don't like when other people invite guests to their wedding. Penny and Leonard were getting remarried so their families could attend this time (and a few friends). Mary, Sheldon's mother, is not family to Penny or Leonard, and while they like her, they wouldn't consider her a close friend. I think Penny liked the idea that Mary was hooking up knowing how it would bother Sheldon, who didn't realise what was happening. And it was funny to her knowing the conflict it could cause since it didn't affect her at all.

Bishop73

Chosen answer: Imhotep had no weapon and there was no point, with his goal close at hand.

MasterOfAll

And yet he tried suffocating Rick in the original movie.

Question: There is a purple purse with butterflies that Britney wears. You can see it all through out the first day at her school and in the café. Does anyone know who designed it or where I can buy one?

Question: I am really confused by one scene. When Buford realises that Bandit is leaving the same service station he is at, he attempts to drive after him, but the front of his car is cranked up, When it cuts back to that scene, Junior (for no apparent reason) is lying on the hood and a crowd is watching them. Was there some missing scene which explains why Junior is in that odd position? Also why is Buford's car cranked up to begin with?

Gavin Jackson

Chosen answer: There's no missing scene; it's just a joke, albeit not particularly well-executed. Basically, the car was cranked up to replace the tires, and Buford forgot about them in his haste to pull out and crashed into the car in front of him. When we cut back, the joke is that he hit the other car so hard Junior flew out of his seat and wound up on the hood. The crowd gathers, as they tend to do in real life, around the accident to see what happened.

Question: What's wrong with Greedo shooting first? I agree changing it is pretty pointless, but what difference does it make? How does it affect the movie?

MikeH

Chosen answer: This has already been asked and answered on this site, in the past few weeks in fact. But again: It doesn't affect the movie, but it affects the character of Han Solo and how he is meant to be perceived by the audience. If he shoots first, he's an outlaw, a rogue, and, in the classic Western tradition, quicker on the draw than Greedo. If Greedo shoots first, Han is just killing in self-defense, which does nothing for his character and makes the whole scene superfluous, other than establish that people want to kill him.

Answer: Also, Han shooting first places doubts about his motives in the viewer's mind early on. It establishes Han as ruthless, willing to do whatever it takes to survive. Might he turn Luke and Ben over to the Empire if he decides it's in his best interests? But having Greedo shoot first turns Han in to just another generic good guy.

Answer: I mostly agree with the other answers about Han, but his shooting first is integral to the plot and not about showing any ruthlessness. Greedo cornered Han and intended to turn him over to Jabba the Hut to collect the bounty on Han's head. Greedo told Han, while holding him at gun point, that he wanted the money Obi Wan was paying Han, then implied he was going to kill Han before turning his body over to Jabba for the reward. Han's only option was to kill Greedo right then and there. He basically is shooting Greedo in self-defense (or for self-preservation). As well as establishing what his character is like, the scene also serves as exposition that shows Jabba had put a price on Han's head, Greedo was a deadly adversary, that Han leads a dangerous and illegal life, and he was desperate to resolve his dilemma of living under a death sentence.

raywest

As a child of the 70's, I grew up with the notion of Han shooting first. Never gave it much thought, to me he was in a situation of kill or being killed. The debate seemed over a moot point to me.

Chosen answer: No. But Jake's paranoia and possessiveness had consumed him to such a degree that he was convinced that he (Joey) had, based on Vickie's impulsive remarks.

Question: In the opening credits, Clark's passport has the name "Clark W Griswald" instead of Griswold. Was this just intended because Clark can never seem to do anything right, or even get it fixed when it's wrong? (like the Wagon Queen Family Truckster he ended up buying even though that's not the car he ordered...?).

Answer: The answer could be any of those suggestions. It could also very well be a movie mistake. It's not uncommon for character names to be misspelled, either on some document or in the cast credits.

raywest

Chosen answer: The actual name is Bluejohn Canyon. According to online tourist info for Utah, "It appears to have been named after a minor Robbers Roost outlaw by the name of John Griffith. Griffith had one blue eye and one brown eye and thus was saddled with the nickname "Blue John." It is recognized that he kept stolen horses in the area, perhaps watering them at nearby springs. In the fall of 1899 Griffith is reported to have put in at Hite with a small boat with the intention of reaching Lee's Ferry. He was never heard from again."

raywest

Robert Moves Back - S3-E25

Question: Robert and Amy are in Ray and Debra's basement listening to some rock music with a great guitar solo and Ray comes in to get something from his office. Anyone know the name of the song or the artist?

Yvonne Smits

Answer: War.

By whom?

Edwin Starr.

Question: Why was The Headless Horseman ordered to kill the Killian family including their incredibly young son?

Answer: As revealed by Lady Van Tassel to Katrina during the film's climax, the midwife Mrs. Killian was abreast of the secrets regarding the affairs of Peter Van Garrett with the widow Winship, as well as their unborn child. Mrs. Killian revealed this secret to Lady Van Tassel right in front of Mr. Killian, which signed both of their death warrants. However, Lady Van Tassel most likely commanded the Headless Horseman to kill the Killians (as opposed to just saying Mr. & Mrs. Killian), to which the Horseman would instinctively murder their child too. It may have been an oversight on the part of Lady Van Tassel, as the child would undoubtedly be ignorant of affairs and the intricacies of legal matters regarding wills, but then again, she probably didn't care anyway.

Phaneron

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