Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi

Question: 'Darth Vader uses his lightsaber to cut an elevated catwalk causing it to collapse, and Luke slides down, runs and hides. How did Luke manage to stay hidden from Vader before Vader makes him come out of hiding?

Question: Who is Luke talking about when he covers up his hand and says that he has a promise to keep to an old friend? Who is the old friend?

Tyler R

Answer: Yoda. When he was departing for Cloud City to save his friends in the previous film, he promised Yoda that he would return to Dagobah to complete his training.

Phaneron Premium member

OK. But I thought he was talking about the holeish thing in his hand since he covered it up when he said it. I must have misunderstood it.

The hole in Luke's robotic hand reminds him that he got that robotic hand in the first place because he lost his duel with Darth Vader at Cloud City - a confrontation Yoda warned him he was not ready for.

TonyPH Premium member

Question: After Anakin becomes Darth Vader, he seems ruthless, actually evil. "From my point of view, the Jedi are evil!" Is just one quote. That being the case, this movie makes it seem like Anakin knows that he's evil and wishes he wasn't. Basically, my question is, why didn't Anakin turn on Palpatine sooner? Or simply leave the Sith?

Answer: Darth: "Obi-Wan once thought as you do. You don't know the power of the dark side. I must obey my master." It's implied that the dark side is intoxicating, once you totally give in to the dark side it has a hold on you, and appeals to morality and rationalization are useless against your lust for its power. (On a symbolic level, the dark side is a metaphor for vice. Darth Vader is an addict and abusive parent. It's actually funny how many scenes still make sense if you replace "the dark side" with "the bottle" or similar).

TonyPH Premium member

If we bring the prequels into it, it's one of the criticisms of those films that they only make the question of how much Anakin is a "true believer" more confusing. But it stands to reason that at first Anakin may feel vindicated in his resentment toward the Jedi. Later on, Vader may not feel that as strongly, but by then his anger has turned toward himself for failing to save Padme. He may feel that a man as terrible as he does not deserve to be "rescued" from the dark side, leading to a feedback loop where he only gets further enamored with its power and does more evil things which causes him to hate himself even more, and so it goes.

TonyPH Premium member

Answer: Anakin was seduced by the emperor to think that the Jedi were evil. This was partly fueled by anger &fear, thinking Padme would die if Palpatine didn't help save her. After he turned to Darth Vader & joined the dark side, he eventually realised the true nature of the Emperor, but he was to weak to do anything about it. Darth Vader still wanted to rule the galaxy, but didn't want the emperor controlling everything. He just wanted to use Luke to help overthrow the emperor and take over the galaxy. It wasn't until he found out he had a daughter also, and saw Luke about to die by the hands of the emperor, that he realised that Luke was right & he needed to switch sides.

envisaged0ne

Vader was not just using Luke to kill the Emperor. He actually did want to rule the galaxy as father and son - if Luke would turn to the Dark Side, that is.

Question: How come this movie barely showed anything about Luke and Leia's mother? Luke doesn't even ask anyone what her name was (maybe that was hidden from Leia, but he can probably guess that Yoda or Obi-wan would know). I know we can assume that she was discussed off-screen, but they could have revealed a little more about her.

Answer: The Jedi are shown to have something of a blind spot in regards to matters of the heart. Note that when Luke confronts Obi-Wan over lying to him about his father's fate, Obi-Wan's response is haughty and defensive, and gives Luke nothing in terms of regret or apology. They're focused on their mission, not on how Luke feels. Why waste time, in their eyes, telling Luke about his mother? If they had their way, he wouldn't even know about his father. The prequels would make this more explicit, showing that the Jedi are conditioned from the beginning to let go of all "passions" because they could so easily be corrupted, and their inability to understand Anakin's emotions just contributes to his downfall.

TonyPH Premium member

Answer: Why can we assume that she was discussed off-screen? Luke's got more important things to talk about than who his mother was. Yoda dies shortly afterwards and Luke's understandably more interested in how Darth Vader, given that he's got to go up against him, can be his father when talking to Obi-wan's ghost shortly after. Not a lot of time for general chit-chat. Behind the scenes, at that point, very little would have been decided about their mother, as it would be irrelevant to the plot of the trilogy and to discuss her on-screen would have wasted time and slowed everything down.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: What did the emperor mean when he said "only now at the end, do you understand?"

Answer: The Emperor firing lightning from his hands is a shocking development (no pun intended), an ability unlike any Luke had seen before and he was caught completely off-guard and defenseless against. One way to interpret the Emperor's words is "You fool, did you really think I just made that all up about how powerful the dark side is? Now look at you, I'm a feeble old man and I am literally going to effortlessly kill you with my fingertips!"

TonyPH Premium member

Answer: The Emperor meant that he had lured the Rebellion into a trap at Endor, and that Luke came to confront the Emperor believing that Vader ultimately would turn back to the light. The Emperor believed in that moment that he had won, that if Luke would not turn to the dark side then he would murder him and Vader would do nothing to stop him, and that Luke's optimism was misplaced. Of course he was wrong, the Rebellion was saved and Vader did turn, but the Emperor never thought it would happen in a million years.

BaconIsMyBFF

Question: I am confused by Darth Vader's attitude in this movie. In Episode V, he asked Luke to join him and get rid of the Emperor. He seemed quite confident and happy about this idea. Now, in Episode VI, he tells Luke that he "must" obey his master, that the Emperor is Luke's master now, etc. Why does he now want himself and Luke to be the Emperor's servants?

Answer: There are a few possibilities. One is that Vader's proposal was always a ruse - note that even the Emperor offers himself as bait to tempt Luke to turn. Another is that Vader's plan was genuine but he abandons it after Luke rejects his offer. Afterwards Luke's resolve has only gotten stronger, and at that point the only hope to turn Luke to the dark side will require the assistance of the Emperor himself. It's notable that Vader does not seem nearly as passionate here as he does in The Empire Strikes Back.

TonyPH Premium member

Answer: Vader was always the emperor's servant. In ESB, he was ordered by the emperor to turn Luke. Vader (as a Sith) was attempting to convince Luke to follow him (his father) so that they could overthrow the emperor. Once that failed, he could no longer keep his plan a secret from the emperor. Vader most likely suspected the emperor planned to replace him with Luke anyway.

Question: Recently I watched the movie with commentary of amongst others Carrie Fisher. I noticed that she didn't have any comment about the scene where Harrison Ford puts his hand on her breast. Did she ever made a comment about that in a magazine or in an interview? Did Harrison Ford?

Answer: Coincidentally, in the time since this question was first posted, Carrie Fisher revealed that she and Harrison Ford were having an affair. While this may not necessarily have anything to do with the incident asked in the question, it adds the possibility that mentioning it would have been too close to an uncomfortable subject she hadn't yet admitted.

TonyPH Premium member

Answer: I've never seen anything on the subject. Seriously, though, why would either of them comment on the incident? It was an on-set slip-up that made it into the film, nothing more than that and, to be blunt, hardly unusual. In all likelihood, neither really remembers the incident among the many slip-ups that both have undoubtedly experienced in their lengthy careers.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: Can Jedi and Sith actually read thoughts? In this movie, Vader was able to realize that Luke was thinking about Leia during their fight on the Death Star. If he could read Luke's thoughts, even though Luke is also a powerful Force-user (not a weak-minded person), how come Jedi in the past couldn't detect the thoughts of other strong Force-users? For example, why didn't Mace, Yoda, or other powerful Jedi find out that Anakin was keeping a secret about his marriage to Padme, the way that Luke was keeping a secret about having a twin sister?

Answer: Jedi Knights and Sith can read thoughts using the Force, and they can communicate with each other that way if they wish, but they can also block others from reading their minds. The Jedi are well trained in mind control. Darth Vader was able to read Luke's thoughts because Luke was not yet a fully trained Jedi Knight; he was unable to block Vader's mental intrusion. Anakin was an exceptionally strong Jedi, and even as an apprentice, he possessed very advanced abilities.

raywest Premium member

Question: Why did Vader stop Luke when he tried to strike at the Emperor with his lightsaber? I know he said earlier that he has to obey his master, but he keeps encouraging Luke to give in to the dark side. If he hadn't stopped Luke, Luke could have given in to his anger and killed the Emperor, and also rid Vader of the Emperor at the same time.

Answer: It was still too early. While Luke was upset that the Rebels appeared to be losing, he was still relatively calm, and his attempt to strike the Emperor right then was still a rational choice made out of pragmatism, to bring him to justice. They need him to act on pure hatred so he can behold "the power" of the dark side, which they expect to be completely irresistible.

TonyPH Premium member

Answer: Because the Emperor probably wouldn't leave himself so open to attack without a trick up his sleeve (a personal shield, perhaps), and if Luke failed in this direct assault, as Vader is expecting him to do, he would have had to explain why he didn't do anything to defend the Emperor and would have been executed himself.

Captain Defenestrator

Question: Considering Luke's severed hand was replaced by one which looks exactly like a normal hand, why does he wear a glove? Is it explained in the books?

Jon Sandys Premium member

Chosen answer: It's explained in the film, although not terribly clearly. Luke's hand takes a direct blast during the fight on Jabba's sailbarge, putting a rather unsightly charred hole in it. As they leave Tatooine, Luke is seen pulling on a glove to cover the hole - he then wears it, I believe, for the remainder of the film. Presumably, with visiting Yoda and all the preparation for the assault on the Death Star, he hasn't had time to go and get it fixed.

Tailkinker Premium member

Answer: Additionally, from a story standpoint, when Luke cuts off Vader's hand to reveal it to be completely mechanical, he looks at his own gloved hand and is reminded what lays ahead if he turns to the Dark Side. That shot would not have worked as well if he just stared at what appears to be his normal hand, thus they found a reason to put a glove on it early on.

Question: Why does Vader go and stand near the Emperor for a moment before deciding to kill him and save Luke? Earlier, the Emperor told Luke to kill Vader and take his place. It seems strange that Vader would remain loyal after his master just encouraged someone to kill him.

Answer: Vader's alone; for twenty years, he's had only the Emperor, a man who he hates for what he's become, but also the only person truly remaining in his life, having killed or otherwise burned his bridges with everybody else. He has nowhere else to go but to the side of the Emperor. He may well be angry at the Emperor for telling Luke to kill him, but it's exactly the same deal that he tried to make - it's the way of the Sith that the strong replace the weak. The Emperor needs an apprentice; with Luke dead, the Emperor may well punish Vader, but won't kill him, because he doesn't have a replacement. So he initially returns to his master's side, resigning himself to going on as he is, a bitter twisted half-machine in the thrall of a more powerful master. It's only when Luke reaches out to him through the pain that he decides that his son's life is worth more than his own and finally acts directly against the Emperor.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: What's the deal with R2-D2's 'short circuit' after he's shot while trying to override the shield generator's doors? Did the blast cause him to go haywire or is he having a panic attack?

Answer: The impact of the energy shot on Artoo's data-access arm has caused a short in his systems, so he's just going through an overload.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: Who are the two men that the Emperor talks to on the Death Star, after he tells Vader to send the fleet near the far side of Endor, and Vader leaves? I know that who they are is not said in the movie.

Answer: According to the Star Wars Databank, the pair are Sim Aloo and Janus Greejatus, two members of the Imperial Ruling Council, a large group numbering several hundred who act as advisors to Emperor Palpatine and are also sent on missions across the galaxy as his personal representatives. Both are Force-sensitive with some training in the Dark Side directly from Palpatine himself and, as their presence during the Emperor's discussion with Vader shows, are among his more trusted acolytes.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: How did Luke get off the Death Star before it exploded? We never actually see it happen in the movie, or do we?

Answer: He piloted a shuttle out of the hanger. There is a quick shot of him in the cockpit and the shuttle leaving the hangar, which is followed immediately by an explosion.

Cubs Fan

Question: After the massive battle on Endor the Rebels try to make it look like the stormtroopers have won so the ones inside the shield generator will come out. What I don't understand is who's the Imperial guy that appears on the monitor telling them it's over and they need reinforcements? Aren't all the Imperials outside meant to be dead at this point?

Answer: Look close, it's Han Solo with his hand covering his mouth with the radio so as to not give away his identity. You can even recognize his voice. Apparently, he got inside the walker that Chewie highjacked, took an imperial officers uniform from somewhere, then radioed to the base to get them to come out so he could ambush them.

RJR99SS

And a few seconds later, he had the time to go out of the AT-ST, remove his uniform and be on the ground for the ambush?

It's only a few seconds of screen time. Within the film itself, several troops gathered to meet them at the door, which could have taken a couple minutes. That's plenty of time for Han to have removed the helmet and gloves (only his head and hand are visible, so he likely didn't put the full uniform on) and the climbed back down to the ground.

Phaneron Premium member

You only see his head. It doesn't take long to remove a helmet.

It wasn't an entire uniform, just the jacket helmet and glove. And more than a few seconds had passed as the troops inside needed to be assembled and then exit the bunker.

kayelbe

If you look closely, you can see it's about a half-second of footage on a loop. Where they got it is another question.

Question: If I am correct, this movie takes place about one year after Luke left Yoda's training in "Empire Strikes Back." Why does Yoda think that he requires no further training? In the prequels and the "Clone Wars" TV show, Jedi apprentices went through several years of difficult situations and trials before finally being named as Knights or Masters.

Answer: Luke was not being trained under normal circumstances, and the Jedi order no longer existed. Darth Vader is on the verge of defeating the rebel alliance and controlling the galaxy. Luke is the alliance's best hope and there is no time left for years of extensive instruction. He is literally getting a "crash course." Yoda likely also knows he has little time left to live and can no longer teach him. Luke will have to rely on himself from here on.

raywest Premium member

Question: Where in this movie is 1138 said/shown, if it is?

Answer: The number appears albeit almost invisibly on Boushh's (Leia in disguise) helmet. While visible in photos of the props, it's unclear on screen.

Darius Angel

Question: In an answer for one of the other questions here, it says that Leia doesn't know she is adopted until Luke tells her that they are siblings. If she doesn't know, why would he use the term "real mother" when asking her about her mother? It seems that if she didn't know she was adopted, she would think it was strange for him to ask about a "real" mother.

Answer: It's never stated anywhere in the films whether Leia knows that she's adopted or not. Given her apparent lack of surprise at Luke's reference to her "real mother", it seems more than likely that her adoptive parents have told her at some point.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: Why was the AT-AT walker on Endor not used in the battle of Endor?

DFirst1

Answer: The AT-AT walkers were too large to be practical in the dense forest, unlike on Hoth in the previous film, which was largely barren and thus better suited for the use of the AT-AT walkers.

zendaddy621

Chosen answer: He said he wanted to see Luke with his own eyes rather than through his mask. He was aware that he was doomed and did not care about what would happen if he took the mask off.

Casual Person

Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi mistake picture

Continuity mistake: When Lando says "Go on, you pirate" his entire outfit is reversed - his shoulder holster strap goes the other way, and his rank insignia changes side too. (00:50:00)

More mistakes in Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi

Yoda: When 900 years old you reach, look as good you will not.

More quotes from Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi

Trivia: When Oola the dancing girl (with those two things growing out of the back of her head) is trying to get away from Jabba, she briefly falls out of the top of her costume. It isn't as visible in the letterbox version, but quite visible in the regular version.

More trivia for Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi

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