Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi

Question: What causes the change in the condition of Vader's helmet in the final battle? When he's taunting Luke it's at its normal mirror clean finish yet right after his hand is cut off it's all dusty and scuffed.

Answer: The fight is quite protracted, and several times during the fight, lightsabres are cutting through materials, which logically would cause the dust you describe on Vader.

GalahadFairlight
1

Question: When Vader realizes that Luke has a twin sister, does he know that Leia is the sister or just that someone is Luke's sister? Or does he know when he/Anakin sees Luke and Leia during the Ewok celebration later?

Answer: Vader knows it is Leia when he first hears Luke's thoughts about his twin sibling.

raywest Premium member
1

Question: After Luke and Vader's duel aboard the second Death Star, Why does Luke deactivate his lightsaber and throw it aside?

ExcellentCryer

Chosen answer: Palpatine's trying to turn Luke to the dark side, to make him his new apprentice in Vader's place - he wants Luke to strike the now defenceless Vader down in anger and hate and thus open himself to the Sith way. By throwing his lightsabre aside, Luke's telling the Emperor that, no matter how much the Emperor goads him, he will not raise his weapon against Vader again and that he utterly rejects the Sith way.

Tailkinker Premium member
1

Question: What reason did the bounty hunter (Leia in disguise) have for staying in Jabba's palace overnight? Wouldn't Jabba expect the person to leave after getting the payment for Chewbacca?

Answer: Not necessarily. Jabba's palace is sort of an entertainment hub for the likes of Boushh (the bounty hunter Leia is disguised as). Jabba runs the place like a business, sort of a hotel/club.

Phixius Premium member
1

Question: Lando mentions that he is made a general due to what he did at the battle of Tanaab. Does anyone know anything more about this battle, or more specifically, what Lando did that was so outstanding?

Twotall

Chosen answer: The Battle of Taanab occured about five months after the destruction of the first Death Star when a group of pirates attacked the relatively undefended agricultural world of Taanab. With the planet's small defence fleet massively outnumbered, Calrissian, who was on-planet visiting a casino, bet his fellow patrons that he could defeat the pirates and took his freighter into the fight. Hiding his ship in an ice ring surrounding Taanab's moon, he waited until the pirate fleet was in range, then ejected his cargo, a large number of Conner nets, large electrified nets designed by the military to immobilise ships. With much of the pirate fleet incapacitated, Lando rallied the Taanab defence fleet and eliminated the remaining pirate ships with very few losses. The impressed Taanab government offered him a commission in their armed forces, which he turned down, but he became a hero to the population, a reputation which apparently led to his commission as a General by the Rebel Alliance.

Tailkinker Premium member
1

Question: Does anyone know what Luke's Sith name would have been had he turned to the Dark Side?

Answer: No. As, being the hero of the piece, there was no chance of it actually happening, it's highly unlikely that the subject was ever considered. Even when Luke temporarily joined the Dark Side in the EU comics, no Sith name was ever given.

Tailkinker Premium member
1

Question: When the rebels talk about the "forest moon of Endor," is Endor the name of the moon itself or of the planet it orbits? The initial description makes it sound like it's the planet, but later on they refer to the moon as "Endor." Which is it?

Answer: Endor is the name of the planet. It's never stated in the film, but the novelization explains that the planet Endor was destroyed some time ago and the moon which the Ewoks inhabit now orbits the star that the planet once orbited. The moon is referred to as Endor merely for the sake of brevity, as there is no longer a planet to confuse it with.

Phixius Premium member
1

Question: Why doesn't Leia see Yoda, Anakin, and Obi-Wan's ghosts at the end of the movie (if she does, she doesn't seem to have much of a reaction to it)? I know she hasn't been trained yet, but when Luke was on Hoth (in Episode V), he was able to see Obi-wan's ghost before he had any training, and he heard Obi-wan talking to him during the attack on the first Death Star.

Answer: The precise mechanism is somewhat unclear at this point, leaving us with no particularly good answer, but there are undoubtedly possibilities. Even in the first film, Luke has had a small amount of training with Obi-Wan; it's not much, but it could be enough to allow him to see them. Leia's had nothing at all, so possibly she's simply not capable of it. Alternatively, the 'ghosts' may simply have chosen to appear only to Luke for reasons of their own; two of them wouldn't be recognised by Leia anyway, making it a bit pointless to appear to her.

Tailkinker Premium member
1

Question: I've read that in the expanded/extended universe books, Palpatine has a son named Triclops, who he was disappointed in. Why didn't he like him? Why wouldn't he want to try to train his own son instead of spending time trying to get Vader's son to join him?

Answer: For one very simple reason - Triclops was a pacifist.

Tailkinker Premium member
1

Question: Are there any scenes or references to black holes in any of the "Star Wars" episodes?

Answer: The only reference is a rather obscure one - Han explains in "A new Hope" that the Millennium Falcon did the Kessel Run in 12 parsecs. The Kessel Run is a smuggling route through a cluster of black holes - the faster your ship, the more direct route can be made. The results is measured not in time, but by how close you could cut the black holes, hence the use of "parsecs" as a measure.

Twotall
1

Question: How come we didn't get to see Qui-Gon Jinn's spirit in the end when it was he, himself, who taught Yoda and Obi-Wan (who taught Anakin) this force ability? I think it would have looked good.

Answer: Because, when the film was originally made, the character of Qui-Gon Jinn hadn't been created. It was a relatively easy task to remove Sebastian Shaw in favour of Hayden Christensen - to add a new figure in would have required them to change the framing of the shot, shuffle the figures about, plus get Liam Neeson in to film it and so forth. It just wasn't worth doing. From the story point of view, it's established in the books that those who do merge with the Force in that manner do have to "move on" eventually - a series set some years after Jedi features Luke's final conversation with Kenobi before the latter goes on to whatever awaits him. Jinn would undoubtedly have moved on long before the events of Jedi.

Tailkinker Premium member
1

Question: On the Star Wars website is a picture of Mara Jade. It's supposed to be her dancing in Jabba's palace. I've looked and can't spot her. Can anyone tell me what shot she is in or near?

Answer: In a nutshell, she's not in there, so you can stop looking. When Mara became a pivotal character in the book series that cover the time after the films, a number of images were created for, among other things, the Star Wars collectable card game, using a model named Shannon McRandle (a.k.a. Shannon Baksa) to portray her. There were rumours that Shannon would cameo in the revamped Special Edition of Jedi using newly shot footage, but this did not occur.

Tailkinker Premium member
1

Question: How can the Death Star be operational if the superstructure hasn't been completed yet?

Cubs Fan

Chosen answer: They already had gravity, lighting, plumbing, docking bays, life support etc. I assume the entire station is built around the power core and weapon. All the remaining sections were probably crew quarters, storage, more docking bays etc.

Soylent Purple
1

Question: When a Jedi accepts their death, their body disappears. Darth Vader accepted that he was going to die, so why didn't he disappear? Did he not accept his death, or is disappearing more complex than just accepting death?

Answer: As noted by Yoda in the novelization of Episode III, the disapearance of certain Jedi at death is NOT just about 'accepting' that death. It is a technique, learned through study, that enables the Jedi to bond his conscious soul to the Force instead of simply merging with it. His reference to Qui-Gon at the end of the movie implies that the technique can be learned after death too.

1

Question: Is there a reason why Hayden Christensen replaced Sebastian Shaw as the spirit of Anakin at the end of this movie on the DVD release? It doesn't seem to make sense, because the spirits of Obi-Wan and Yoda appeared as the same age they were when they died.

Answer: This is explained by George Lucas in the audio commentary. When Anakin passes on into the Force, he is able to assume his previous identity (that is, Anakin Skywalker the Jedi Knight, before he turned to the Dark Side and became Darth Vader).

Cubs Fan
1

Question: If Vader wants to kill the current Emperor, and become emperor himself, why does he not let Luke kill him? I am thinking he needs the Emperor to convert Luke to the dark side.

Answer: You are correct. Vader wanted to kill the Emperor but as a Sith he would need an apprentice. He wanted his son Luke to be his new apprentice, but he knew he needed Luke to kill the Emperor in order to completely turn to the Dark Side.

Mark English
1

Question: How did Luke know that removing the mask would make Vader die?

Matty Blast

Chosen answer: Obi-Wan told luke how his father was more machine than man now, and Luke knew Vader had a life support system, so he concluded that he would die without his mask, especialy given the weak state he was in.

Piemanmoo
1

Question: How did the Emperor know that the rebels were going to destroy the new and improved Death Star and that other rebels were going to Endor?

Answer: He has a galaxy-wide intelligence network, plus the insights gained through the Force. He's aware that the Rebels have obtained information about the new Death Star - he claimed to have leaked it himself as part of a trap, but it's possible that he was lying. Either way, he knows that the Rebellion can hardly pass up a chance to destroy the Death Star before it's completed, particularly as they believe that it's not yet operational. As for Endor, it's stated quite clearly that the Death Star is protected by a powerful force field projected from a shield generator on Endor. As no ships can get through the field, that generator has to be the initial target for the Rebels - unless it's taken out, the attack on the Death Star itself cannot proceed.

Tailkinker Premium member
1

Question: Wasn't sure where to put this question but can anyone tell me who Mara Jade is? Where did she come from? How does she fit into the whole Star Wars story?

Answer: Mara Jade only appears in the books dealing with the time period after Return of the Jedi, although, according to those books, she was undercover at Jabba's palace during the events of ROTJ - a particular woman seen in those scenes has been picked out by the fans as being her, although there's nothing from Lucasfilm on the subject. According to those, she was a Force Sensitive who worked as one of a number of special covert agents for the Emperor (known as the Emperor's Hands). She was able to hear his orders over galactic distances, and passed those orders on to others. After the fall of the Emperor, she hooked up with a smuggling ring, where she eventually came into contact with Luke Skywalker. Initially, she wanted to kill him, in accord with the final instruction embedded into her psyche by the Emperor, but never went through with it (generally because she found herself in situations where she needed him alive, but partly because, despite her service to the Empire, she was not a fundamentally evil person). Eventually, through a complex set of circumstances, she was able to eliminate the last command from her head. For the next few years she came into sporadic contact with Luke, who gave her Jedi training and the two became firm, if somewhat wary allies. Ultimately, they married and now have a son, Ben.

Tailkinker Premium member
1

Question: This is something that covers the whole of the Star Wars films, but is most noticeable on this film. There is life on Endor, which means there is an atmosphere. Why then, do none of the spaceships entering this atmosphere show any signs of heating as they pass through it?

Answer: It's most likely to do with the fact that the ships in the films enter the atmosphere in a highly controlled manner, unlike our ships, which, to all intents and purposes, simply fall through the atmosphere, using atmospheric friction to slow themselves down, causing the intense heat buildup - Star Wars ships don't need to do that. The other factor is that the majority of ships in the Star Wars universe have shields of one sort or another - these may have some effect in dispersing any possible heat buildup.

Tailkinker Premium member
1
Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi mistake picture

Revealing mistake: After the heroes get snared and surrounded by Ewoks on Endor, the Ewoks mistake C3PO for a god and start bowing. There is one Ewok which only has holes where the eyes and mouth are and you can see the eyes and mouth of the person inside the Ewok costume. (01:07:50)

More mistakes in Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi

Yoda: When 900 years old you reach, look as good you will not.

More quotes from Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi

Trivia: When Oola the dancing girl (with those two things growing out of the back of her head) is trying to get away from Jabba, she briefly falls out of the top of her costume. It isn't as visible in the letterbox version, but quite visible in the regular version.

More trivia for Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi

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