Captain America: The First Avenger

Question: The trailer shows the part when Rogers and his men bust open the factory doors (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JerVrbLldXw at 1:59) and the Captain fires off a few shots. It's a different sound from the one in the movie, and I know it's edited in. I'm just extremely certain that I have heard it somewhere in a video game, and it has been driving me nuts that I can't remember what game it came from. Does anyone here know where I might have heard this gunshot effect before?

Friso94

Question: Before he was genetically altered and his real body was used, how did they get Chris Evans to look so scrawny?

Quantom X Premium member

Chosen answer: A couple of techniques were used. In most cases, Evans would film the scene normally, then the effects team would digitally shrink his character down to the smaller size. This would generally require some on-set adjustment to allow for eyelines - in some cases Evans would be physically lower than other actors, in others, they would look at his upper chest while he looked over their heads. In a few cases, actor Leander Deeny, who possessed the necessary scrawny physique, would film the scene, collaborating closely with Evans to ensure that the character's mannerisms remained the same. Deeny's features would then be digitally replaced with those of Chris Evans. Deeny appears briefly in the movie as the bartender in the pub Rogers visits to recruit his team.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: In a scene with Rogers, Erskine describes the serum as "good becomes great, bad becomes worse." At the time (as revealed on his medical sheet at the start), he had several things like heart conditions and asthma. Wouldn't these be made worse by the serum?

Answer: No what Erskine meant were personality traits, not physical traits.

lionhead

Question: Where is Steve when he meets Erskine for the first time?

THE GAMER NEXT DOOR

Chosen answer: In a recruiting office at the Worlds Fair in Queens.

Question: How old are Howard Stark and Tony Stark supposed to be? Howard seems to be in his twenties during ww2 in this movie however his son looks like he's in his late 30's in the Iron Man movies. My grandparent were born during the war and their kids are now in their 50's/60's themselves, for Howard to have been in his early 20's during the war and still have a son who only around 40 in the 2010's then he must have had Tony when he was in his 60's maybe late 50's. Am I mistaken or has the movie kind of glossed over the fact that the ages don't quite match up?

strikeand

Chosen answer: Howard Stark was born in 1917, making him 25 around the time of the film. Tony was born in 1970. Making Howard 53 when Tony was born. Their ages match fine. As an industrialist it's likely he fathered Tony at a higher age, and men have fathered children at much higher ages.

MasterOfAll

Question: When the Hydra men are using their weapons, the sound of them charging is the same sound effect used in the Iron Man movies where he his charging his arch reactor pulses. Is there any relation between these technologies?

Quantom X Premium member

Chosen answer: While not explicitly spelled out in the films to date, it's implied that Howard Stark developed the arc reactor technology after extensive study of the Tesseract that he retrieved from the ocean floor at the end of the movie. As such, Hydra's Tesseract-powered weaponry and the arc reactor-powered systems in the Iron Man suits share something of a common origin, hence the similar sound.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: What is the song that the Howling Commandos are singing in the pub scene?

Chosen answer: It's a drinking song from 1883 called "There's a Tavern in the Town."

LorgSkyegon

Question: It is made very clear in Thor that the safest place for powerful, mythical objects is Odin's weapons vault. So why would the Asgardians leave the most powerful and mythical of them all, the Tesseract on earth, behind just the push of a button?

Friso94

Chosen answer: As we have no idea of the circumstances behind the Tesseract ending up hidden in a Norwegian church, we can hardly say that the Asgardians have simply chosen to leave it there. Most likely the reason is that they simply don't know where it is; while they're powerful, they're certainly not omnipotent. If, though some unknown past event, the Tesseract was lost to them, then somebody took considerable care in concealing it, it seems entirely reasonable that the Asgardians would be completely unable to locate it and return it to their vault.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: When Captain America is rescuing the POWs, he's asked if he can get them out and he replies, "No problem. I've knocked out Adolf Hitler 200 times". I found it odd that he gave such a specific number. Is it maybe a reference to something from the comics (not just the number of War Bond sales pitches he has given)?

Chosen answer: No, it was just the number of performances he's done. The number was specific simply because the line was funnier that way.

Phixius Premium member

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