Questions about specific movies, TV and more

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Question: How do the agents get the police and swat team to work for them? Do they pose as FBI or something like that?

Chosen answer: Sure. Agents are perfectly equipped to hand the local police force any kind of identification whatsoever to prove that the Agents are federal officers and the locals would be compelled to assist.

Phoenix

Foul Balled / The Boy Who Would Be Queen - S2-E7

Question: I want to make sure that what I'm thinking and what my little sister said is right: Trixie said she wanted to date a certain boy with a pink hat who isn't afraid to admit he liked "Kissy Kissy Goo Goo" and "Skull Squisher". But at her birthday party, when Timmy says these types of things, Trixie suddenly denies it. Why? (And to repeat, I want to make sure.).

Chosen answer: Because Timmy is not popular. Even though that is what she really wants, she has her popular image to protect.

Grumpy Scot

Question: Shouldn't Jay already know that the bus charges for fare, seeing as how he bought two bus tickets in "Chasing Amy" to set up his and Silent Bob's meeting Bethany in "Dogma"?

Chosen answer: You may have noticed that Jay is very stupid, and quite often stoned. He doesn't seem to type to learn from his mistakes, especially not ones that happened several years ago.

Shay

Rooftop - S3-E4

Question: In this episode, they try to take the suspect's DNA but he says he's a Jehovah's witness so they don't take it. Why can't you take DNA from a Jehovah's witness?

Chosen answer: It was a misconception about Jehovah's Witnesses beliefs. Only blood transfusions are discouraged in their beliefs, medically.

Question: Can someone please explain what the whole deal was with the "The music stops" dialogue? I don't understand what it had to do with Lothose, and as to why he never killed her (despite her just sitting there on his lap while he talked)?

Azureth

Chosen answer: If she listened to the silence (didn't pay attention to what Lothos was saying), then she would be able to ignore what gave him the ability to put her in a trance, and she could then put up a good fight. As to why he didn't kill her when she was just sitting there: for some reason bad guys always have to have the last word (explaining their scheme, what-have-you). Chalk it up to Bad Guy Stupidity.

MoonFaery Premium member

Show generally

Question: Does anyone have any idea exactly how much in common the series is to the movie? As in what details changed, and do the events from the movie even transpire into the series?

Azureth

Chosen answer: The series followed on from the original script that Joss Whedon wrote, which was in turn radically different to the movie that was released - thus numerous references to Buffy burning down a building at her old school, which never happened in the movie. Basically, the only story that follows over is this: Buffy was a student at Hemory High, quite popular (she compares herself to Cordelia) until Merrick, her first Watcher, discovered her and told her her destiny. While fighting a group of vampires, Merrick ended up dead (according to Whedon, he was trapped by a group of them and was forced to kill himself to avoid being turned); Buffy later trapped the vampires in the school gym and burned it to the ground, resulting in her expulsion from Hemory and her move to Sunnydale.

Shay

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Question: I haven't seen the majority of all the BtVS episodes, so I could have missed something, but in the last episode Giles states that there are other Hellmouths' if that's true, and there is only one slayer (before Buffy had all the potentials powers unlocked) then are all the other people that live on them screwed? What keeps vampires from running rampant and killing everyone?

Azureth

Chosen answer: Several factors restrict the demons besides the Slayer. The Watchers' Council is obviously much larger than it would need to be to simply guide the Slayer; much of their energy is directed toward gathering information for their own use against the demons. They have elite teams (seen in season 3) for Special Forces-style offensives. There are also innumerable witches and warlocks around the world, some of whom fight for good (like Giles' coven from the end of season 6) and all of whom would be attracted to the energies of the Hellmouth. Some demons like Whistler (end of season 2) exist to balance the forces of darkness with the forces of good and would handle their share as well. The existence of the Initiative (season 4) shows that the world's powerful elite are aware of the demon world to some extent and take measures to address it. Lastly, there are always some civilians who take part in the battle because they become aware of the existence of demons, like Kain from "Phases", Gunn's gang from Angel, and Wood from season 7. Obviously, there's a whole lot more than just the Slayer defending the world, but no one else can really match her firepower.

Phoenix

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Question: Can someone please explain how exactly a Watcher knows who the chosen one is? In the season 2 episode "What's my line" Kendra explains that her parents gave her away to her watcher when she was young because they believed it would be best for her. How did they know about the slayer mythos and how did they know Kendra could be one? I always thought that when a new slayer is born it could be anyone; and that was no discernible factor in who would be the next one to become the slayer.

Azureth

Chosen answer: From what we see in the series, certain girls are identifiable as potential Slayers - Kendra clearly fell into this category. The identification method is presumably mystical in nature, but the Watchers' Council are pretty effective at that sort of thing, so they're quite good at tracking down the potentials ahead of time. Not perfect, though - it does appear that Buffy herself may have slipped through the net - certainly she had no inkling of what she was until she'd already taken on the role of Slayer. It is possible, however, that this was actually cultural - an American family would hardly be likely to turn over their daughter to some strange man for 'training', so the Watchers might have chosen to keep an eye on her covertly, whereas some other cultures (like Kendra's Jamaican parents) might be more willing to believe.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: In The Fairy Godmother's song, there is one line about something to do with the moon. What does she say?

Chosen answer: You can spoon on the moon with a prince to this tune.

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Question: In the first main movie, Baltaar the traitor (as a human) is executed before the Cylon's supreme ruler; yet in the later movies (and probably the TV series, which I did not get to watch) he reappears. How can this be possible?

Chosen answer: The original BSG has something of a complex version history. Several versions exist, but the rationale behind what you're referring to is as follows. BSG, before anything else, was a TV series - the 'pilot episode' was a three-part tale called "Saga of a Star World". In that three-parter, a last-minute alteration to the script meant that Baltar was ultimately spared execution, because Glen A. Larson, the series producer, decided that he liked the Baltar character enough to keep him around for the rest of the series. The theatrical version, which was edited down from the three-parter and was shown in some countries before the US TV broadcast, lost quite a number of scenes, including the one where Baltar is spared. The real continuity of the series can only be found in the TV version - the movies, all of which were created by editing together existing episodes, miss out scenes leading to such apparent continuity errors.

Tailkinker Premium member

Answer: Baltar wasn't executed... the supreme leader decided to spare him to send him on a peace mission with the humans. I have every episode... just watched it again.

Answer: Strange... given I saw Battlestar Galactica at the movies when I was a kid. Aka the 'pilot' you refer to (which WAS a movie shown at the cinema).

Yes, there was a theatrical release of the film, which was released after the original 1978 series ended. This 1979 film is the edited compilation of the 1978 series "Saga of a Star World" episode.

Bishop73

Show generally

Question: In the first main movie, Baltaar the traitor (as a human) is executed before the Cylon's supreme ruler; yet in the later movies (and probably the TV series, which I did not get to watch) he reappears. How can this be possible?

Chosen answer: The original BSG has something of a complex version history. Several versions exist, but the rationale behind what you're referring to is as follows. BSG, before anything else, was a TV series - the 'pilot episode' was a three-part tale called "Saga of a Star World". In that three-parter, a last-minute alteration to the script meant that Baltar was ultimately spared execution, because Glen A. Larson, the series producer, decided that he liked the Baltar character enough to keep him around for the rest of the series. The theatrical version, which was edited down from the three-parter and was shown in some countries before the US TV broadcast, lost quite a number of scenes, including the one where Baltar is spared. The real continuity of the series can only be found in the TV version - the movies, all of which were created by editing together existing episodes, miss out scenes leading to such apparent continuity errors.

Tailkinker Premium member

Answer: Baltar wasn't executed... the supreme leader decided to spare him to send him on a peace mission with the humans. I have every episode... just watched it again.

Answer: Strange... given I saw Battlestar Galactica at the movies when I was a kid. Aka the 'pilot' you refer to (which WAS a movie shown at the cinema).

Yes, there was a theatrical release of the film, which was released after the original 1978 series ended. This 1979 film is the edited compilation of the 1978 series "Saga of a Star World" episode.

Bishop73

Show generally

Question: In the first main movie, Baltaar the traitor (as a human) is executed before the Cylon's supreme ruler; yet in the later movies (and probably the TV series, which I did not get to watch) he reappears. How can this be possible?

Chosen answer: The original BSG has something of a complex version history. Several versions exist, but the rationale behind what you're referring to is as follows. BSG, before anything else, was a TV series - the 'pilot episode' was a three-part tale called "Saga of a Star World". In that three-parter, a last-minute alteration to the script meant that Baltar was ultimately spared execution, because Glen A. Larson, the series producer, decided that he liked the Baltar character enough to keep him around for the rest of the series. The theatrical version, which was edited down from the three-parter and was shown in some countries before the US TV broadcast, lost quite a number of scenes, including the one where Baltar is spared. The real continuity of the series can only be found in the TV version - the movies, all of which were created by editing together existing episodes, miss out scenes leading to such apparent continuity errors.

Tailkinker Premium member

Answer: Baltar wasn't executed... the supreme leader decided to spare him to send him on a peace mission with the humans. I have every episode... just watched it again.

Answer: Strange... given I saw Battlestar Galactica at the movies when I was a kid. Aka the 'pilot' you refer to (which WAS a movie shown at the cinema).

Yes, there was a theatrical release of the film, which was released after the original 1978 series ended. This 1979 film is the edited compilation of the 1978 series "Saga of a Star World" episode.

Bishop73

Question: Does anyone know the name of the song Alice sings after she's walking through the forest and some creature is wiping away her path? She's crying when she sings it.

Chosen answer: It is called 'Very Good Advice.'

Hamster Premium member

Question: I heard that Ron Jeremy had a walk on part in this film, does anyone know in which scene he is in?

Chosen answer: Ron Jeremy can be seen in the crowd outside the firehouse right after the containment unit is shut off.

Question: Maybe I'm misunderstanding something here but how can the transformers be deemed unique to Cybertron (according to the opening prologue) when every other planet seen in this movie has transformers on it?

Chosen answer: I believe the story goes that after being created on Cybertron, ancient transformers migrated to other various planets, where they then "evolved" over time to different forms of transformers (just like ancient peoples of this planet migrating and "evolving").

Bruce Minnick

Question: To play Loveless, were Kenneth Branagh's legs removed digitally with a blue/green screen?

Chosen answer: Assuming it's the same technique used for Gary Sinse in Forrest Gump, Mr. Branagh was probably wearing blue leggings which was used to digitize out his legs.

Lisa T Ellis

Question: This is sort of a question for the three movies, I just don't know where to put it...In the first movie, Emma Watson's (Hermione) hair is very thick and bushy, where as in the next two movies, her hair is a bit more straight and neat. In the first movie, was that her real hair, or did she have hair extensions or something?

Chosen answer: It has always been her natural hair, she just seemed to 'grow' into it. It has also been styled differently in each subsequent movie, presumably for the maturity of the character.

Reformed Dispatcher

Season 5 generally

Question: I'm still not sure on the Dawn idea. She's a key and the monks gave Buffy and her friends memories. But where was she supposed to be every episode before the one where she is revealed? And don't they remember that she was never "in the way" before? Maybe I just think its a stupid idea but I just don't understand where she was and how she came from nowhere.

Chosen answer: This is explained throughout season 5 - Dawn was created by the monks during the season 5 episode "Buffy Vs. Dracula" (as evidenced by Joyce's comments about the house being quiet early on in the episode, before Dawn's appearance in the final moments) and they implanted false memories about her life up until now in her head and the heads of her friends. The reason we never saw her before then was that she hadn't been created yet. She came from nowhere - the Key was just a swirling ball of green energy before the monks turned it into Dawn. The reason no one notices her any more now is that, while the memories aren't perfect (Buffy mentions in "Real Me" that Dawn seems to be getting in the way more often lately), they are good enough to fool everyone enough to accept her.

Shay

Question: Did Joe kill the guy in the hotel that he stole the money from?

Chosen answer: Probably not. The man was a masochist who derived sexual pleasure from being physically abused. Joe apparently crammed the phone receiver into the man's mouth and left, unknown if he died from it or not.

Question: Can anyone please tell me what the gist of the Barclay card ads were (the ads Rowan Atkinson was in)? What did it have to do with Johnny English?

Chosen answer: The adverts showed Rowan Atkinson as a bungling secret agent, similar to Johnny English, who would mess up various assignments and need to make use of Barclaycard features to bail himself out (eg, being in a foreign country without local currency, breaking expensive items that were Barclaycard insured, etc.)

Moose Premium member

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