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Question: If every former Hogwarts student who goes bad was in Slytherin, why has Hogwarts kept the house over the years? Why not disband it?

Chosen answer: Because it is too firmly entrenched in wizard society and it wouldn't be allowed. One-fourth of the wizard population would probably revolt if there was any attempt to disband it. Ron's comment that every bad witch or wizard was from Slytherin was a child's over-generalization and actually untrue. For example, Peter Pettigrew was a Gryffindor and Prof. Quirrel was a Ravenclaw. Slytherin House itself is not evil, but those who are drawn to the dark side possess Slytherin traits in abundance, including resourcefulness, intelligence, cunning, ambition, self-preservation, exclusivity, and so on. These are not evil qualities, but they do help drive evil wizards. It is pointed out in the books that not all Slytherins are evil or support dark magic. Those following a dark path would likely do so regardless of what House they were sorted into.

raywest

Question: I've had arguments with one of my friends about this line in the film when Scarface says "the only thing in this world that gives orders is balls", my friend thinks he says "the only thing in this world that gives orders is BOSS" (which wouldn't make much sense). What does he say, balls or boss?

dan coakley..

Chosen answer: You are correct. It's balls. You can find it in the script.

MasterOfAll

Answer: The official script says "Boss". It's a reference to Frank Lopez not being Tony's boss anymore. "Balls" is completely incorrect and out of context.

Question: I've had arguments with one of my friends about this line in the film when Scarface says "the only thing in this world that gives orders is balls", my friend thinks he says "the only thing in this world that gives orders is BOSS" (which wouldn't make much sense). What does he say, balls or boss?

dan coakley..

Chosen answer: You are correct. It's balls. You can find it in the script.

MasterOfAll

Answer: The official script says "Boss". It's a reference to Frank Lopez not being Tony's boss anymore. "Balls" is completely incorrect and out of context.

Question: What is the meaning behind both Snape and Lily having a doe as a Patronus? Why does Dumbledore *not* find it "curious" (during the scene after Harry's "death")?

Chosen answer: Snape loved Lily all his life, despite her choosing another; his Patronus being the same as hers is a mark of how his heart always belonged to her. Dumbledore was well aware of Snape's feelings for Lily, so their shared Patronus comes as no surprise to him at all.

Tailkinker

Question: Is Blue Falcon supposed to be based off Captain Falcon from the F-Zero games? There are an awful lot of similarities. Almost blatantly so.

Quantom X

Chosen answer: No. Blue Falcon is a character created by Hanna-Barbara in 1976 featured in the animated series "Dynomutt, Dog Wonder".

MasterOfAll

Question: Why did Professor Snape insist on teaching Professor Lupin's class about werewolves (when he takes over the class)? If he or any other staff members suspected Lupin of being one, it seems that they wouldn't want to cause any panic or distraction among the students.

Chosen answer: Severus Snape hates Remus Lupin because he was best friends with Sirius Black and James Potter, who used to torment Snape when they were all students at Hogwarts together. Snape is teaching the class about werewolves in the hope that one or more of the students will recognize Lupin for what he is, tell their parents about it, and then Lupin will be fired from his position. Snape takes this roundabout course of action most likely because all the faculty had promised Dumbledore to keep Lupin's nature a secret from the student body for this very reason.

Phixius

Question: I've read that all 5 children in the story represent one (or more) of the seven deadly sins. What is the exact rundown of this?

Chosen answer: There's some debate over this one, but certainly there's some lining up between the characters in the movie and the seven deadly sins, although whether this was necessarily intentional is entirely open to debate. Some are pretty clear - Augustus Gloop is obviously Gluttony, Violet Beauregarde is Pride, Mike Teevee would be Sloth and Veruca Salt Greed. Charlie himself is Envy although unlike the other children he ultimately overcomes his sin and therefore escapes punishment. Wrath is less easy; Veruca Salt shows elements of it, as does Mike Teevee (especially in the Tim Burton remake), but arguably Wonka himself is the best representative, with his outburst at Charlie towards the end of the movie leading to him ultimately begging for forgiveness. Finally there's Lust, which, when interpreted as an intense desire for something rather than something strictly sexual, could readily be assigned to quite a number of the main characters or indeed the world in general, where we see people going to extraordinary and ludicrous lengths to find one of Wonka's golden tickets.

Tailkinker

Question: In the scene where the children are singing 'So long, Farewell', Kurt sings in a very high voice 'goodbye'. Is he really singing this or is someone else singing this?

peach

Chosen answer: Darleen Carr - the younger sister of Charmian Carr, who played Liesl - sang that line, according to Charmian's autobiography "Forever Liesl".

Jeff Swanson

Question: Forgive me, I haven't read the books yet. Do they explain how new Hogwarts students are able stop going to regular school in the Muggle "world"? It seems unlikely that several children, year after year, could suddenly miss school at age eleven (when they start going to Hogwarts) without the Muggles noticing.

Chosen answer: In the UK, the age of eleven marks the point where children leave primary school and move on to secondary school. They do not all go together; children from a single primary school will end up separating and going to several different secondary schools located in their general area or even further afield in some cases. As such, the age of eleven is a very good point for children to surreptitiously drop out of their local system to attend Hogwarts, which could be explained to Muggle relatives and friends as a boarding school or other special educational facility without touching on its true nature. Hogwarts draws its pupils from all over the country, with only a hundred or so per school year. Given that a large proportion of these will be the children of wizarding families, who are generally home-schooled, then we're likely only talking about at most one or two children from any given area, which would be highly unlikely to be noticed. In the event that somebody does somehow pick up on it, it would be a relatively simple matter for the Ministry of Magic to make them forget all about it.

Tailkinker

Question: There is a piece of music that you can hear for just a split second when Mr. Blond is tuning through the radio stations looking for K. Billy's super sounds of the 70s (right before he tortures the cop). The exact same piece of music is also heard for a split second in Kill Bill Vol 2 when the camera is looking down on the bride's body in the church. What song is this piece of music from?

Question: When John Connor sends Kyle Reese back in time to protect his mother, Reese then becomes Connor's father, how could John Connor be the same person he is if a different man's sperm produced him?

dan coakley..

Chosen answer: The whole thing's a paradox, which, as time travel doesn't exist, we have no way to determine how it would work out in reality, and thus any movie dealing with time travel can make up its own rules. Effectively an infinite loop has been set up - Sarah gives birth to John, John grows up, meets Kyle, sends Kyle back to meet Sarah, they make love, Sarah gives birth to John and so on and so on. There may have been an original father to John at the beginning, but he was supplanted in the loop by Kyle and thus, in the timeline the film presents, the John who sent Kyle back is the one fathered by Kyle himself. Alternatively, maybe John Connor wasn't the original resistance leader, that some other leader sent Kyle back the first time, leading to the birth of John Connor, who then became the resistance leader instead; thus Kyle has always been John's father. This is the nature of a paradox, that there are things about the situation that don't necessarily seem to fit together, but they somehow come about anyway. The detail can be debated ad infinitum, but no concrete conclusion can be drawn, because that's just how this works.

Tailkinker

Question: Who was John Connor's father before he sent Kyle Reese back in time to protect his mother?

dan coakley..

Chosen answer: Kyle was. It's a paradox, an infinite loop; Kyle goes back, fathers a son who later meets the younger Kyle and sends him back to father a son who later meets the younger Kyle... etc. etc. There are no hard and fast rules governing this sort of thing, so there doesn't necessarily have to have been an original father who kicked the whole thing off before being supplanted by Kyle. Or maybe there was. Or maybe there was originally a different resistance leader who sent Kyle back, leading to the birth of John who became resistance leader instead. This sort of thing can be debated until the cows come home, but ultimately the only answer is "it's a paradox".

Tailkinker

Question: Why is he called a Blade Runner?

Quantom X

Chosen answer: It's simply a term used for the police detectives who specialise in tracking down and "retiring" replicants. The origin of the phrase is not given in the movie. In reality, Hampton Fancher, who wrote the first draft of the script, encountered the term as the title of a movie that was never made, that centred around a supplier of illegal medical equipment. He and Ridley Scott liked the phrase so much that they acquired the rights to use it for their movie.

Tailkinker

Question: How is Kyle Reese younger than John Connor in this movie? I thought Reese was Connor's father.

dan coakley..

Chosen answer: It's explained in the original "The Terminator" - Kyle Reese volunteers to be sent back to the 80s to protect John's mother Sarah, before John is born. They get romantically involved and he fathers John in that time period.

Jon Sandys

Question: Approximately what year is the film set? The adamantium would place it after the Origins film (which I believe to be set circa 1979) in which he loses most if not all of his memories. This begs the question, how is it that he remembers WWII and the atomic bomb?

Chosen answer: The chronology of the X-Men film series is, to put it mildly, somewhat screwed up. The first movie was released in 2000 and is described in an on-screen caption as being set in "The not too distant future", which isn't the most helpful statement, could be two years, could be ten years, who knows. The Wolverine is set about two years after the events of X-Men: The Last Stand, which is in turn about a year after the events of the first movie, so think about "the not too distant future", whatever that means, and add about three years onto that. This does mean that, yes, it is indeed set some decades after the events of the Origins movie, during which he lost his memories. It is, however, also set after a period during which he worked with Professor Xavier to regain some of his memories. It could therefore be suggested that Logan remembering his experience at Nagasaki represents that they had at least a partial success in recovering some of his memories.

Tailkinker

Question: In the scene with Butch and Esmeralda in the taxi (right after he kills the other boxer), does anybody know why Quentin Tarantino made the view out of the rear windscreen look so fake?

dan coakley..

Chosen answer: Tarantino is big on tribute to older films and filming techniques, hence the projection-style background.

Captain Defenestrator

Question: The scene where Maria and the children sing 'The Lonely Goatherd', there is a girl singing: 'One little girl in a pale pink coat heard' and 'She yodeled back to the lonely goatheard' (nearly at the end, the second time this is in the song). Who is singing here: Brigitta or Louisa?

peach

Chosen answer: This line occurs 2:15 into the song. We see the singer is Brigitta (dark hair), played by Angela Cartwright, and not blonde Louisa, played by Heather Menzies.

kuffpah

Question: In the scene where the Surprise is becalmed, at the very start as the camera zooms out it shows that the ship is flying a line of signal flags. What is the message that they are trying to send? I tried looking it up, but I didn't have any luck.

Chosen answer: The signals that were contemporary to the setting of the film were Sir Admiral Home Popham's "Telegraphic Signals or Marine Vocabulary." However, it appears that there is no clear signal actually being sent. For reference see Nelson's signal of "England expects that every man will do his duty" during the Battle of Trafalgar. By Pope's coding, one is supposed to signal in groups of hoisted flags, beginning with a red/white diagonal signaling the start of a message, and a blue/yellow diagonal signaling the end. Individual flags stand for numerals and the groups of numerals match phrases or letters within Pope's codings. For example a lone "3" signal represents the letter "C" while a set of signals sending "416" stand for variations of "Instruct-ed-ing-ion-s." The best I can make from the film (the yellow colors of the flags appear to be washed out due to post-processing), is that they begin a signal then send "392" ended with a "substitute" flag. Possibly standing for "impossible-ility" while the section on the Main seems to indicate "602" or "part-ed-ing-ition" without a "Finished" flag. For reference here is a link to a scanned original copy of the 1803 Edition of the Codes: https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=nyp.33433008120291;view=1up;seq=1 And a link to a PDF that has the 1806 version with drawings of the flags: http://3decks.pbworks.com/f/Admiral%2520Home%2520Popham%2520Telegraph%2520signal%2520book%2520Final%2520edition.pdf.

Question: Did Roy break Deckard's fingers or just dislocate them?

Quantom X

Chosen answer: He dislocated them. You see Rick try to relocate the fingers later on.

Casual Person

Question: What effect did they use to get the actors' eyes to glow, revealing they are replicants?

Quantom X

Chosen answer: A two-way mirror at a 45 degree angle in front of the camera with the camera pointing at the see-through side. A light was shone at the reflective side and reflected into the actor's eyes on the optical axis of the lens.

Sierra1

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