Questions about specific movies, TV shows and more

These are questions relating to specific titles. General questions for movies and TV shows are here. Members get e-mailed when any of their questions are answered.

Question: What kind of car does Joey drive?

Answer: Chevrolet Camaro Z28. Model year could be '94 to '97.

BaconIsMyBFF

Question: Wasn't the plan that Monty's father thought about actually bad, at the end? I mean, even if Monty started a new life far from New York and his friends and family and never got recognized, his father would be arrested when coming back to New York. Suddenly him and his father disappear and later on his father gets back to New York, a little bit suspect no?

Answer: Monty's father was suggesting they go into hiding together. He was not suggesting that he would take Monty out west and return to New York himself.

BaconIsMyBFF

Question: I've been wanting to finally watch the TV series, but I've never understood one thing... I know the movie is technically not 100% canonical with the series, but I've heard they later tried to connect it with the series with a comic-book adaptation. So should I watch the movie before the series? Or should I just go ahead and watch the series on its own, and treat the movie as an entirely separate "thing"? Or can it be done either way?

Answer: I'd say you treat them as 2 separate things. My personal opinion is that you should just watch the series and forget about the movie.

lionhead

Question: At the very end of the film, Tony Stark informs Peter Parker that he is a now a member of the Avengers and reveals his new Spidey suit. Peter moves toward the camera, with Tony Stark plainly visible on the right side of the screen and Happy Hogan far in the background (all three are in this shot), as we hear a male voice in the foreground enthusiastically say, "Yeah! Give that a look!" Except that Tony Stark didn't say it, Peter Parker didn't say it, and Happy Hogan was much too far away to have said it. The dubbed voice obviously does not belong to Tom Holland, Robert Downey Jr or Jon Favreau at all. So who said it?

Charles Austin Miller

Answer: Go back and watch the scene again. It looks like you just might be remembering it wrong. It's Tony during the tracking shot. He says "Yeah, give that a look!" in reference to the suit. He's actually not quite on camera when he says the line, hence you don't see him say it. But it's definitely Tony.

I understand what you are saying. Tony isn't on screen during the line and the voice does sound different. The implication is that Tony is saying the line, without the line Tony is just standing there waiting for Peter to respond for a long time and it would be out of character for him to do so (he's an extremely talkative person). There isn't enough information available to determine whether or not Downey is actually the one who recorded the line, it could be him just recorded in post. But you are definitely correct, I listened to the scene with headphones on and there is a noticeable difference in the tone of voice for this one line and no others.

BaconIsMyBFF

Question: I've only seen this movie once so far and I haven't read the book yet, so my question is, what exactly happened in the scene where Ana said one of the safe words for the first time? I don't really understand what made her say that; was Christian teasing her too much or something?

Answer: He was trying to make her understand how she made him feel whenever she broke a promise (usually about her safety) by punishing her and it became too much, too intense. She also felt like it was revenge instead of love.

Question: My understanding is that Vee orchestrated the plan for Ty to bring a blank filled gun, but how was the dare revealed to her before being told to shoot her opponent, let alone before given the gun?

Answer: Once she saw the gun and knew how crazy the game was, she formed an idea that someone's would get shot and believed that it would be her.

Question: Why do the townsfolk let people come into town if there is a disease in the water. How are they staying alive? Do they know about it?

Answer: They don't know about it. The only resident in town to contract the disease was the hermit. The sheriff even remarks to Deputy Winston on his radio that the kids at the cabin were going on a killing spree and that they had some kind of skin disease, indicating the disease was heretofore unknown to them. It's possible that the hermit's dog was the carrier.

Phaneron Premium member

Answer: It's "Leisure Complex" by Dave Gold and Gordon Rees. Can be found on YouTube. The relevant clip is around 25 seconds in.

Answer: Adidas.

Answer: It was destroyed by an electrical shock when he turned around and saw Rosie fall over dead.

Phaneron Premium member

Question: What exactly was Clu's vision of "the perfect system"?

Answer: Going by Clu's behavior and personality in the film, Clu's idea of a perfect system was likely a system where every component worked as intended and as expected. One where every action by programs could be consistently predicted. The Isometric Algorithms very existence went against everything that he believed was "perfect", in that by their nature their actions could not be predicted. Users also seem to exist in contrast to Clu's beliefs as their human emotions cause them to act irrationally and erratically.

BaconIsMyBFF

Answer: The sand from the enchanted hourglass kept the spider from killing her. She breaks the hourglass and gives the sand to Ynyr. Once the sand has been poured out from his hands there's nothing to protect her from the spider.

BaconIsMyBFF

Chosen answer: For two reasons, one to be polite and not act suspiciously, if he acted nervous or uncomfortable, the sheriff would be wary of him. Second, so the sheriff would leave quickly in case he had no cash or wanted to pay with a credit card. There were no slide cards back in the 1970's.

Question: When Patton visits the battlefield he says he was there when the battle happened. What did he mean? He wasn't born yet.

Answer: George S. Patton was not speaking figuratively. In real life, Patton very much believed in reincarnation, and he believed he had been reincarnated as a warrior many times, going back thousands of years. His poetry described his real-life belief in reincarnation.

Answer: In real life, George Patton wrote a poem called "Through a Glass, Darkly." This scene is a way to tie that poem into the film. Depending on how you interpret the poem (I suggest reading it and drawing your own conclusion) he's talking about his past lives, where he has been reincarnated as a soldier, or warrior, etc each time. In the poem he suggest he remembers each life and the battles he's fought. So in the scene he's saying he fought in the Punic Wars. If you think he's speaking figuratively, then through his studies of past wars, he's able to vividly image himself there and it feels as if he was there.

Bishop73

Question: What is the inspirational music or speech that is playing in background while he is self training to lose weight to join the military?

Answer: According to the novel, it sleeps the entire time.

BaconIsMyBFF

Answer: Sleep for 27 years.

Question: Wouldn't 7000 songs in a 32 gigabyte iPod be really short songs?

Answer: It depends on the format of the songs. MP3's would take more space, so 7,000 MP3's would be roughly 2.5 mins on average. However, the specs for the 32GB 3G iPod were "Holds up to 7,000 songs in 128-Kbps AAC format."

Bishop73

Question: Why did Barty run away, letting Harry go at the world cup? I know he heard the voices of Hermione and Ron but he's smart enough to know that he could've killed them and then just taken Harry. After all, isn't that why he was there in the first place?

Answer: Taking Harry and killing Ron and Hermione at that time would have made it too obvious that Voldemort was behind it. Voldemort's plot hinged on abducting Harry in a way that no one would immediately know what had happened to him. The TriWizard Tournament was traditionally extremely dangerous, resulting in students in past events being killed while competing. Harry's disappearance in the maze would initially be attributed to some tragic mishap, giving Voldemort time to complete his resurrection.

raywest Premium member

Yeah, the ritual needed to be made ready too I think, for Voldemort's revival.

lionhead

Question: Why didn't he use his crazy super intelligence, or his telekinesis, to either find a cure for his tumor or at the very least slide the tumor out of his own brain?

Answer: 1. After losing consciousness a second time, George wakes up in the hospital and is told by Dr. Brunder that instead of the tumor destroying brain function, it has been stimulating it not only making George hallucinate seeing a bright light, but, was also responsible for giving him his abilities. Unfortunately, by the time the tumor was detected, it had grown out of control meaning that George had only a short time to live making a search for a cure impossible, especially since he was told there was a very slim chance of survival if he had it removed. 2. If George had tried to use telekinesis to remove the tumor, he would probably have ended up killing himself in the process.

Answer: George saw the alien light flash twice. The implication was that the first alien light flash actually created the "tumor" in George's brain, and it was the tumor that gave him his superhuman abilities. There's no way George could telekinetically remove the tumor or send it into remission because it was the source of his powers. If he started tampering with it, he would instantly lose his powers.

Charles Austin Miller

Ah yes.

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