Questions about specific movies, TV shows and more

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Chosen answer: It was both. Wynn, a fine character actor, was suffering from pancreatic cancer while this film was being made. He died in 1986, the same year the film was released.

raywest Premium member

Chosen answer: According to IMDb there were over a 1000 extras. I don't think you will find an exact number anywhere.

Mortug

Chosen answer: Probably the only known conflict among them was when Matthew Perry had issues with prescription drugs and alcohol; the other Friends helped to pressure him into seeking help during the series' run. Other than that, it appears the six had a pretty close relationship. They've apparently not all been together in a long time, but that's largely due to scheduling issues and that some of them are naturally closer to some of the cast than others.

raywest Premium member

Chosen answer: De-atomized. The same thing that was happening to Wolverine at the climax, except Cyclops couldn't heal himself as it was happening.

Phixius Premium member

Question: Near the end, before the fair, Wendy is looking at the pictures on the computer, and she sees her picture. The clue is that Ian will cause Wendy's death, but Jason is next to her, and his face is blurred out. Is this another clue to Wendy's death?

M0vi3

Chosen answer: Yes, it is another part of Wendy's death. At the end, on Train 081, Wendy was looking out the window, and the people were blurry, and then Wendy saw Jason's face blurred out in the window.

M0vi3

Question: In the beginning, Richy gets his foot caught in a bear trap. Did Jason put this there or did the people put it there?

tetracore99

Chosen answer: It was left by hunters. Jason doesn't have the mental capacity to set traps for his victims.

razoprill

Jason had set up an elaborate warning trip wire that rang bells at his house. I am sure he could have set a bear trap.

I agree. Jason has shown to be quite intelligent and even able to carefully plan his attacks so setting up a bear trap wouldn't be hard to do.

Question: I've seen the movie several times now but I still don't know the answer to this: in the beginning of the movie, who kills the two Japanese snipers - zombies or some clones of Alice?

Answer: Based on the sounds to go with the scene, I'd say it is zombies taking the guards out. However, considering following events it is more likely that Alice and her friends have something to do with it.

Question: What's the story behind Langdon's Mickey Mouse watch? He alludes to it, but never explains it.

raywest Premium member

Chosen answer: In the book it is explained that the watch was a gift from his parents on his ninth birthday.

Mortug

Question: When Clyde is about to die from the bomb, why didn't he just end the call on the phone he was calling from? He could have probably cancelled the detonation.

tetracore99

Chosen answer: Unfortunately, that wouldn't have done it. Once the phone on the bomb recieved the signal there was no going back.

Phixius Premium member

Question: How did the Terminator manage to find a hotel room already equipped with surgical tools and bandages? Doesn't seem like he set it up with supplies earlier since the first we see is him breaking in via the fire escape.

Answer: He isn't breaking in via the fire escape, hes just using it as a means of coming and going without being seen by the hotel staff, so at any point during the movie, he could have equipped himself with those tools. It is not necessary for a movie to show every intervening action onscreen.

GalahadFairlight

Question: When Marty wakes up in the new 1985, the clock changes from 10:27 to 10:28. Why would his siblings be eating breakfast and preparing to go to work this late in the morning?

geezer

Chosen answer: It's Saturday. A lot of office jobs, if you're going to them on the weekend, would start later and end earlier.

Phixius Premium member

Question: This has been an endless point of debate among my friends and I; how sensible is the placing of the pulse rifle's ammo counter? It seems to me that it'd be very problematic since, if the operator were right handed, they'd have to turn the weapon on its side to read how many bullets they had left.

Answer: A digital ammo counter, like the ammo indicators on magazines, wouldn't be useful in the heat of battle. However, it would be very useful while not in battle. For example, with a real firearm, you would need to remove the magazine to check how many rounds remained in it. With a digital display, you could simply look. The larger issue, of course, is that with a display on the gun, your enemy would also know how many rounds you had left.

If you had the counter on the top of the weapon facing you, you could immediately see how many rounds you had left and the enemy could only see it if he were behind you.

Answer: Yes you're right, the ammo counter is badly placed, but then again a seasoned marine wouldn't need to rely on it in the first place as they'd know through experience when they are about to run out.

GalahadFairlight

Answer: In all honesty you really wouldn't need an ammo counter. Either you shoot until the weapon runs dry and then you have to reload or you shoot until the threat is gone in which case you would do a "tactical reload" where you remove the partial mag and insert a fresh mag to ensure you have max ammo again for the next firefight.

That is, if you have another mag to do a tactical reload with. Real life is not like in videogames where you reload and only count bullets, you gotta have magazines.

lionhead

Question: Can a helicopter do barrel rolls and loop-de-loops like Murdock is doing after the A-team leaves the hospital and are being chased to the US border by Tuco?

Answer: They can, but only if they have a set of modified rotor blades to be able to do it. The Apache for one is able to do it. The Huey in the movie however is unlikely in reality to be able to do it - there would be no need to fit the modified rotors to what is essentially a transporter.

GalahadFairlight

Question: Is it possible the king and queen could recognize Rapunzel as their long lost daughter, despite her short brown hair, when they knew she was born with long golden hair? If so, then how?

Answer: It's entirely possible. Rapunzel has a similar face appearance to her mother's, and you could also count the family bond of simply knowing. She also has green eyes, which are uncommon, so the parents probably knew that she was unlikely an impostor.

virtual-toast

Question: I don't fully understand the Game Show part in the beginning. What was the significance of that?

jackdawson

Chosen answer: It's a recreation of when the real Frank Abagnale, Jr. appeared on the TV game show, "To Tell The Truth," that ran on CBS from the mid-1950s to late-1960s. A celebrity panel would try to pick out the genuine contestant who had an unusual secret from among two other imposters, who gave bluff answers to questions.

raywest Premium member

Question: Is he actually sane at the end? I ask this because it looks like he makes them think he is insane so they will give him a lobotomy, and in that way he could forget about killing his kids indirectly.

toby1kenobi

Chosen answer: I think it's meant to be ambiguous, as nothing's explicitly stated either way. My take was the same as yours, namely that he'd rather die as a good man than live as a monster, to reference the line he says, but him still being actually insane also fits.

Jon Sandys Premium member

Chosen answer: Farina is a hot wheat cereal like Cream of Wheat.

Ingabritzen

Question: Just a quick one: Why the hell didn't Rose just move over on her door to give Jack some room? And why didn't Jack take the piece of wood from the frozen guy with the whistle after he had died?

Answer: In an episode of Myth Busters, they checked to see if Jack could've actually fit on the board and survived. Their first result stated the the movie was correct; there was not enough buoyancy to keep them both afloat. After some thinking they decided to tie Rose's life jacket under the board to increase the amount of buoyancy, and sure enough the board did float, but it's not unreasonable that that wouldn't have occurred to Jack and Rose. When they consulted James Cameron about the results he simply stated, "I think you guys are missing the point here. The script says Jack died. He has to die. So maybe we screwed up and the board should have been a little tiny bit smaller, but the dude's goin' down."

Answer: Insider did an interesting article on this debate. The "door" Rose was floating on was actually a carved piece of wood paneling that hung about the first-class lounge. The evidence for this resides on display at the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic in Nova Scotia where an original panel of the ship served as the inspiration for the design of the wood seen in the movie. This is important because those panels were only made from teak, pine, and oak. Physics Central calculated the possibility of survival for all three based on buoyancy. They estimated teak would have been too heavy and would have sunk under its own weight. Pine may have supported their weight, but was ruled out when the panel flipped when Jack tried to grab it. The oak paneling seen was only strong [and large] enough to contain Rose as the weight of both Rose and Jack would have outweighed its buoyancy.

Invader_Gir

Question: In the scene where Solara hijacks the car, why does the man who had Eli's sword in him stop her from starting the car, take out the blade, and get out from the car and kneel on the ground? Was he trying to say something to Solara or the leader?

Answer: Most likely, Redridge is giving Solara a chance to escape Carnegie's regime. At this point, he knows he's dying, but perhaps still wants the best for her. Remember, he had a crush on her the whole movie (blocking her while she was getting Eli's canteen filled, bargaining with Carnegie for her before chasing after them, even asking Eli nicely to give up the book after the gunfight in the house). I think it may also have been used as a self-redemption moment for one of the bad guys.

Jason Sieberg

Answer: Due to Eli's previous protections from harm, Redridge is already wondering if there isn't a higher power protecting Eli. When Redridge is impaled and realises he's in his last moments of life, he kneels, looks to heaven, and gives himself over to that higher power, hoping for redemption.

Question: Everybody seems to believe that the machines are not able or at least not willing to make use of the energy from the sunlight above the darkened sky. But I have some problems with that. Morpheus tells us about this when he is with Neo in the construct for the first time. But is Morpheus really 100% believable in that question? Isn't this just his version of the story? We can believe him that the humans darkened the sky (this is confirmed in Animatrix and visible on screen) and the machines created fields of humans as their source of power (he saw those fields himself). But maybe he's wrong? Could he really know for sure how much energy the machines need? Or that the machines don't use the energy from sunlight? Is there any point in the trilogy where the machines definitely do confirm this? For me it would make more sense for them to do so: using the humans would inevitably decimate the population with every generation. If we believe that the humans' "foods" are the liquidated dead this would hardly be enough for the whole lifespan of another human (and there's also energy drained from the machines). I don't say this wouldn't make sense for the machines, but sooner or later they will have to use another source of power if they want to live forever, so why not start with it now? They would have infinite energy and could control humanity at the same time. And as we see they are able to build any types of complex weaponry/flying guardians etc., it should be easy for them technically to get past the dust and use the energy somehow. Am I right with this or is there a better explanation?

Answer: Human bodies would not be 100% efficient and so energy generated would always be less than energy fed into the farm, so overall making energy losses for machines. The energy fed (dead bodies etc) is not usable by machines directly. Humans seems to be good for energy conversion as well as energy storage. So any excess energy from fusion can simply be stored away in the matrix. Hence the battery analogy (which needs to be charged to be useful).

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