Charles Austin Miller

New this week Plot hole: It is firmly established in the last half of the film that movie characters and movie weapons do inflict damage and death in the real world. However, early in the film, a bundle of dynamite comes straight through the movie screen and explodes in the real world movie theatre. That quantity of dynamite should have gutted the theatre, easily; but, when Danny Madigan and Jack Slater cross from the movie world back into the real world, there is absolutely no damage to the theatre.

Add time

Charles Austin Miller

21st Jan 2018

Stargate (1994)

New this week Factual error: When they first power-up the Stargate in the military facility (using Jackson's decryption), the thing surges to life, and electrical sparks spray out of overloaded connections all around the control room. This could only happen if there were no fuses or electrical breakers in the military's control system, which is a ridiculous notion for such advanced military technology. In real life, a powerful overload situation would instantly burn out fuses and trip breakers and the whole system would simply go dead (there would be no sparks). Showers of sparks are a common error in many science fiction and space fantasy films dating back many decades.

Add time

Charles Austin Miller
Upvote valid corrections to help move entries into the corrections section.

New this week Suggested correction: If there would be breakers and fuses then yes, the system would simply go dead and then they would have nothing. They intentionally let the system nearly overload because without power they wouldn't be able to finish the sequence.

lionhead

No, that's not the way sophisticated (and expensive) electronic technology works. If you have sparks spraying out of electrical connectors, that means you're melting down millions and millions of dollars of hardware. No technician or electrician or even a first-year auto mechanic would intentionally design and hardwire an electrical system without fuses and/or breakers.

Charles Austin Miller

21st Jan 2018

Chaplin (1992)

New this week Continuity mistake: Near the end, when the elderly Chaplin and his biographer are seated on the terrace, chatting about madness, Chaplin's hands are clasped high up on his chest, clutching the shawl around his shoulders. In several subsequent shots, his hands are relaxed in his lap, then clasped again high on his chest, again and again, from shot to shot.

Add time

Charles Austin Miller

New this week Continuity mistake: In at least two shots, as the Phoenix first becomes airborne, it is obvious that there are no men clinging to the wing surfaces.

Add time

Charles Austin Miller

16th Jan 2018

Chaplin (1992)

New this week Trivia: Anthony Hopkins played George Hayden, Charlie Chaplin's biographer (throughout the film's many flashbacks). However, biographer George Hayden was a completely fictional character created only for this movie. In real life, Charlie Chaplin alone wrote his autobiography.

Add time

Charles Austin Miller

New this month Question: When the Enterprise recovers Chekov and Captain Terrell, they just accept Chekov's and Terrell's false explanation, even though McCoy is standing right there with a medical tricorder. Why didn't McCoy's medical tricorder pick up the Ceti eels lodged in the brains of Chekov and Captain Terrell?

Charles Austin Miller

New this month Answer: It's unknown. The tricorder may not have been programmed at the moment to detect any parasites.

raywest

New this week Answer: The eels bond with the host brain and are virtually undetectable until the host dies or they are found for some reason.

Other mistake: At the beginning, as Eggsy is pursued through city streets by the Golden Circle henchmen, the three pursuit vehicles are all firing rooftop mini-guns at Eggsy, in spite of the fact that they are all in single-file, one vehicle behind another. The Golden Circle vehicles would have been riddled with their own gunfire.

Add time

Charles Austin Miller

Trivia: When the animated series was being voice-cast, the only original actors chosen were William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelly, James Doohan and Majel Barrett (Gene Roddenberry's wife). James Doohan was going to double as Chief Engineer Scott and as Lieutenant Sulu, as well as any needed additional male voices; Majel Barrett was going to perform several female voices including the Ship's Computer and Communications Officer Uhura. When Leonard Nimoy (Spock) learned about the casting choices, he threatened to quit the animated series unless original series actors George Takei and Nichelle Nichols were hired to play Sulu and Uhura. Nimoy's opinion carried a lot of weight, so Takei and Nichols were immediately hired.

Add time

Charles Austin Miller

The Practical Joker - S2-E3

Trivia: The animated series featured the first appearance of the Holodeck (called the Rec Room) in this episode only. Gene Roddenberry wanted to use the Rec Room/Holodeck idea in the original live action series of the 1960s, but found that budgetary constraints were prohibitive at that time. The Rec Room finally appeared once in the animated series, in this episode, in 1973. It wouldn't be seen again until Star Trek: The Next Generation, in 1987, some 14 years later.

Add time

Charles Austin Miller

Question: Isn't this film blatantly derivative of Guillermo del Toro's earlier films, "HellBoy" and "HellBoy: The Golden Army"? It seems to me that the Asset in "The Shape of Water" is a direct knock-off Abe Sapien from the Hellboy films. The amphibious Asset is held at a top secret facility, as was Abe Sapien; the Asset is fed hard-boiled eggs, as was Abe Sapien; the Asset develops a love interest and romantic relationship with a female air-breather, as did Abe Sapien. To top it off, del Toro called in contortionist-actor Doug Jones to play the Asset in "The Shape of Water" (Doug Jones also played Abe Sapien in the HellBoy films). "Shape of Water" could almost be a spin-off the old HellBoy films, given Guillermo del Toro's involvement and recycling of familiar themes.

Charles Austin Miller

Answer: There are a lot of Hellboy fans who speculate this is an origin story of Abe, or at the very least the Asset is the same species, but del Torro has denied it. Abe is a copyrighted character that del Torro's Hellboy was based on, and he doesn't own the copyright. In addition, prior to The Shape of Water, del Torro was in talks with Universal about remaking "The Creature from the Black Lagoon", only making the movie center on the creature's (Gill-Man) perspective and getting together with Kay (the female lead). Del Torro has stated that the Amphibious Man is based on Gill-Man and this film is what he had pitched to Universal, but was turned down by them. Although, a creature developing a love interest in a human female isn't unique, nor is capturing a creature to study (both happen to Gill-Man, Abe, and Amphibious Man). But the fact that Doug Jones plays both Abe and the Amphibious Man only seems to strengthen theories of some connection to Hellboy, but at this point we only have del Torro's word that it's not and why he choose the creature to be so similar at this point would only be a guess.

Bishop73

Continuity mistake: Near the beginning of the film, Bill Murray takes a seat front-row-center in court. Moments later, he's doing push-ups in the corridor. A few moments later, he's back in the same seat front-row-center in the courtroom.

Add time

Charles Austin Miller

26th Nov 2017

Psycho II (1983)

Trivia: For the last murder scene, when Norman brains his mother with a shovel in the kitchen (the only murder Norman actually commits in the entire film), his mother turns into a life-size dummy just before the fatal blow. You notice that she inexplicably leans far forward and bows her head (to hide her face for the dummy transition) just before Norman hammers her. This scene took several days to shoot, to get the transition just perfect, and it is the best practical special effect in the movie.

Add time

Charles Austin Miller

26th Nov 2017

Bleed for This (2016)

Factual error: When Vinny Panzienza has his cervical halo brace removed (without anesthetics), he yells and groans and grunts in pain, but his hands are relaxed on the arms of the chair. I can tell you, from experience with this exact situation, the pain is so intense that his hands should have been clenched as tight as a vise.

Add time

Charles Austin Miller

24th Nov 2017

K-Pax (2001)

Question: Despite Dr. Mark Powell's certainty that "Prot" is a delusional man named Robert Porter who lost his mind and attempted suicide years earlier, no explanation is ever given for Prot's extraordinary resistance to powerful psychiatric drugs, his superhuman vision (into the Ultraviolet range), and his knowledge of deep-space astrophysics, which not only rivals but exceeds the knowledge of Earthly astrophysicists. Prot's enigmatic abilities are tested by experts, and the experts are left scratching their heads. The probability that Prot actually is an alien entity occupying a deeply-damaged and "discarded" human body seems confirmed on many levels, above and beyond the rantings of a mere mental patient. So, why does Dr. Powell consistently reject the hard evidence before his eyes?

Charles Austin Miller

Answer: He rejects it for two main reasons. First, each of the items you mention have possible, even if unlikely, explanations. Some people have strange or no reaction to certain drugs (for example I have almost no response to any painkillers). People who have had their corneas replaced with artificial lens can see near ultraviolet (though nowhere near 300-400 angstroms). The sheriff described Porter as being very bright, and he was in to astronomy, so while a great stretch, not impossible he somehow formulated the information he presented. The second reason, building upon these, is Occam's razor. As a person in the sciences, Dr. Powell is driven to believe things have a reasonable explanation, even if we don't currently know what it is, and thinking Prot is just a bright and unusual human is a more reasonable belief to him than believing Prot is an alien possessing a human's body.

jimba

Just remarking, there's no comparison of painkillers and psychiatric drugs. Thorazine and Haloperidol (Haldol) are both powerful anti-psychotic drugs with numerous side effects. Prot is immune to Thorazine and Haloperidol (as well as alcohol), which is more than extraordinary, it's otherworldly.

Charles Austin Miller

Revealing mistake: At the beginning of the film, even though the sky is cloudless and clear blue, the streets and highways are uniformly wet, as if a storm had just swept the area. Then, even though all of the vehicles on the highway are raising clouds of wet spray, none of the vehicle windshields are splattered with moisture, and none of the vehicles are using their windshield wipers. In fact, the only time we see a woman use her windshield wipers is when the guy throws a lit blunt onto the woman's windshield and it catches some dry leaves there on fire. So, in summation, dry leaves catch fire on the windshield of a car in spite of heavy road spray on a wet highway on a cloudless day. Multiple inconsistencies.

Add time

Charles Austin Miller

Question: In the tavern, the dwarves emphatically tell the huntsman that dwarven females are so repulsive that dwarf reproduction only happens accidentally, in bad lighting and under the influence of drink. Which sounds quite repulsive. But, when the huntsman and male dwarves are later captured in the net trap, the female dwarves turn out to be perfectly lovely, even quite sexy. Then, even stranger, one of the male dwarves later apologizes for the appearance of a lovely female dwarf (who is standing right next to him in plain sight), claiming that she was hit in the face with a rock. So, what was the purpose of the male dwarves obsessively lying about the beauty of female dwarves? Or were the male dwarves blind to true beauty for some reason?

Charles Austin Miller

Answer: Most likely it was to protect dwarf females by deterring other males' interest in them with tales of their ugliness. Men are less likely to pursue unattractive women.

raywest

Question: During the botched raid on the university campus, the troops move in too quickly (alerting Bruce Banner), and General Ross snarls, "I wanna know who jumped the gun!" Did General Ross ever find out who jumped the gun? Was it Emil Blonsky? If it was Blonsky, why did General Ross never reprimand him?

Charles Austin Miller

Answer: Since some time has passed probably between the Hulk taking Betty to safety and General Ross talking to Doc Sampson, there's a possibility that he was told who was responsible for alerting Bruce to their presence. When Bruce looks up, it isn't Blonsky he saw but another soldier.

21st Nov 2017

Speed (1994)

Factual error: At the airport, Jack attempts to disarm the bus bomb from underneath, on a dolly towed by another vehicle. Meanwhile, Annie must continue driving the bus in circles on the runway at a speed above 50 mph. This scene takes 8 minutes, meaning Annie makes at least 2 laps of the entire 2-mile-long runway, complete with turns at the ends. There is no way that the towed dolly could remain positioned directly underneath the bus through the turns, as Jack would have swung out under centrifugal force.

Add time

Charles Austin Miller

21st Nov 2017

Speed (1994)

Continuity mistake: Early in the film, Jack shoots Harry through the left thigh (taking the hostage out of the equation). At the police awards ceremony, Harry is using a cane on his right side and his limp favors his right leg. After the ceremony, in the bar, when Harry gets drunk and starts to leave, he's using his cane on the left side and his limp favors his left leg.

Add time

Charles Austin Miller

Trivia: When Scotty and Kirk are discussing the mysterious fate of Capt. Balthazar Edison, Scotty mentions a couple of theories, including the possibility that the USS Franklin was "captured by a giant green space hand." This is a direct allusion to the original Star Trek television episode "Who Mourns for Adonis?" in which the giant green hand of the Greek god Apollo actually grabs the USS Enterprise in space. Also, during the kaleidoscopic end credits of "Star Trek: Beyond" (specifically, at the moment the credits read "Paramount Pictures and Skydance Pictures present"), a giant green space hand reaches straight for the camera.

Add time

Charles Austin Miller

Join the mailing list