Charles Austin Miller

16th Apr 2018

The Craft (1996)

New this week Continuity mistake: When the girls wake up on the beach, they see Nancy out in the surf, walking on water. As she casually strolls back to the shoreline, a wide shot shows the water is calm and flat and blue from the beach to as far as the eye can see. However, as the camera cuts to Nancy reaching the beach, the surf behind her is suddenly rough and crashing and murky brown, with 3-foot waves breaking on the shoreline.

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Charles Austin Miller

10th Apr 2018

Dementia 13 (1963)

New this month Question: At the very beginning, John and Louise stroll down a dock, get into a row-boat and start across the lake; but John dies of a heart attack half-way across, and Louise dumps his body into the water. Throughout this entire scene, John's transistor radio is warbling a rockabilly song that sounds Elvis-inspired (but it's not Elvis). What is the song and who sang it?

Charles Austin Miller

New this month Answer: "He's Caught" by Buddy Fowler and the Fads. It was an unreleased song used for the movie.

Bishop73

New this month Factual error: This horror-fantasy film (a 1958 knockoff "The Mummy") was inspired by the faceless whole-body plaster casts taken from the volcanic ash of Pompeii, at the foot of Mt. Vesuvius. The running mistake in this movie is the assumption that the faceless bodies of Pompeii were 2000-year-old mummies preserved by volcanic ash and could, thus, be re-animated (by radiation, in this case). The fact is, the victims at Pompeii were originally encased in hot volcanic pumice and ash, and the corpses then disintegrated, leaving hollow "molds" of human bodies underground. It wasn't until the mid-19th Century that archaeologists first discovered the molds, filled them with plaster, then extracted the whole-body plaster casts for display. Since the faceless bodies of Pompeii are nothing but modern plaster casts, there would be nothing to re-animate, by radiation or any other improbable means.

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Charles Austin Miller

New this month Trivia: This film is based on a true story; but, of course, much dramatic license is taken with the facts. For example, while the movie depicts Lola shot in the chest (either by Willie Boy or by herself), the real-life "Lola" was shot in the back by the posse that was chasing them. Also, while the movie depicts Sheriff Cooper gunning down Willie Boy at the end, the real-life Willie Boy committed suicide by his own hand.

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Charles Austin Miller

New this month Continuity mistake: When the MR-1 first lands on Mars, the sky visible through the portholes is fiery red, which is the uniform color of all exterior shots in the film. However, a whole series of interior shots throughout the film show that the sky visible through the portholes is suddenly and inexplicably baby blue. At two points, when Iris sees a Martian through the porthole, the sky momentarily turns pitch black.

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Charles Austin Miller

New this month Deliberate mistake: For all exterior shots on the surface of Mars, the crew's "pressurized" space helmets have no face-plates (their faces are fully exposed to the hostile Martian environment). The transparent face-plates they intended to use reflected far too much studio set lighting, such that the glare would have obscured the actors' faces. On a $200,000 budget and a 10-day production deadline, they simply scrapped the face-plates and shot the scenes with wide-open helmets.

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Charles Austin Miller

26th Mar 2018

Star Trek (1966)

Journey to Babel - S2-E10

New this month Continuity mistake: An Orion spy (disguised as an Andorian) attacks Captain Kirk in the corridor on Deck 5 and plainly stabs Kirk in the back on the right side. As he staggers to his feet, Kirk first reaches to the wound with his right hand, indicating that it is, indeed, on the right side of his back. He then reaches far across his back with his left hand to touch the wound, and we see blood on the back of his hand (but not on his sleeve). So, it is visually established that the wound is on the right side of his back. But, a few moments later in SickBay, Dr. McCoy announces that Kirk's wound is a "puncture to the left lung." Then, later in the episode, Kirk his holding his left arm as though he is suffering pain on the left side.

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Charles Austin Miller

New this month Question: In the very last scene of the movie, we see Christina Ricci and David Krumholtz sitting in the Addam's family graveyard, and Krumholtz is placing flowers at Debbie Jellinski's tombstone, when a full human arm (presumably the late Debbie's) shoots out of the grave and grabs his wrist, sending him into screaming fits. However, Debbie was completely cremated to ash by electricity a few minutes earlier in the film. Nothing left of her but ash, shoes and credit cards. So, whose arm reached out from Debbie's grave?

Charles Austin Miller

New this month Answer: It was a prank Wednesday was pulling on Joel. She mentions she would scare her husband to death and then smiles when Joel starts screaming.

BaconIsMyBFF

Yes, she said she'd scare her husband to death. But it is a very animate human arm that reaches out of the grave, causing me to wonder WHO was in the grave to pull off the prank?

Charles Austin Miller

I mean, if it was just a hand coming out of the grave, I would be satisfied that it was "Thing" taking part in the prank. But it was a whole human forearm (which Thing does not have).

Charles Austin Miller

There's no evidence in the film to answer the question. They never show you who the arm belongs to, and with good reason. It would ruin the joke. This is just one of those questions that can't be definitively answered.

BaconIsMyBFF

New this month Continuity mistake: After George knocks out Biff, Biff has an obvious contusion and blood on the right side of his nose and mouth. As the hoverboard chase scene progresses over the next several minutes (particularly in the lighted tunnel), the contusion and blood repeatedly disappear and reappear on Biff's face from one camera cut to the next.

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Charles Austin Miller

26th Mar 2018

Star Trek (1966)

Catspaw - S2-E7

New this month Trivia: This episode (which first aired on ‎October 27, 1967‎) was the only "holiday-themed" episode of Star Trek TOS. It was supposed to be a Halloween-ish story with witches, a spooky castle, black cats, skeletons and zombies, and there are repeated references to Halloween and "Trick-or-Treat" throughout the episode.

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Charles Austin Miller

25th Mar 2018

Star Trek (1966)

The Menagerie (2) - S1-E12

New this month Deliberate mistake: At the very end, the Talosians send a final visual transmission of Vina and Christopher Pike, now whole and happy and reunited after 13 years, holding hands as they enter the Talosian elevator in the hillside. However, in this last shot, the elevator is still half-disintegrated, exactly as it was 13 years earlier when the Enterprise crew destroyed the hillside with a laser cannon. Within the context of "The Menagerie" storyline, this suggests that the Talosians never attempted to repair the elevator for 13 years (even though they continued using it). This incongruity is due to Gene Roddenberry cannibalizing his Star Trek pilot "The Cage," which contained zero footage of Jeffrey Hunter and Susan Oliver entering the intact elevator together (only the destroyed elevator). So, Roddenberry deliberately tried to "slip one by" the audience in this brief shot.

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Charles Austin Miller
Upvote valid corrections to help move entries into the corrections section.

New this month Suggested correction: There are reasons why the elevator would appear damaged. As the Talosians were in control of everything shown on the ship's viewer, the entire scene could be an illusion, or at least the elevator's condition may have been, with the Talosians choosing to allow the viewers to see the elevator in the same condition they last saw it. Just as likely, however, is that the Talosians truly never did reconstruct the elevator, as the whole point of their having a menagerie of other beings was an attempt to breed a race that could physically serve them, for their concentration on their mental powers had led to a complete inability and unwillingness to perform physical tasks (like repairing an elevator).

Still, as long as the Talosians are creating the illusion of Christopher Pike and Vina in their "restored" bodies, why not create an illusion of the elevator and hillside restored, as well? One big illusion of restoration, rather than a composite of dismal reality and happy-ending illusion? Again, to the point of my original post, the obvious incongruity is due to Roddenberry using the only happy-ending footage he possessed, that of Pike and Vina entering the half-obliterated elevator as they did at the end of "The Cage." Certainly, if Roddenberry only had the foresight to shoot Jeffrey Hunter and Susan Oliver entering the intact elevator, he would have used that footage instead. Any attempt to explain away the 13-year incongruity is mere wishful thinking.

25th Mar 2018

Star Trek (1966)

The Menagerie (2) - S1-E12

New this month Revealing mistake: When the Talosians place Christopher Pike and Vina into the "picnic" illusion (in the countryside on Earth), Pike wanders around marveling at how real it all seems. Well, "real" except for the fact that Pike's body is casting 4 distinct shadows in 4 different directions on the ground, the result of studio set lighting.

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Charles Austin Miller

20th Mar 2018

Justice League (2017)

Continuity mistake: When Superman is explosively resurrected by the MotherBox, it disintegrates the suit, shirt, tie and shoes in which he was buried, but he's suddenly wearing what looks like track pants immediately afterwards.

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Charles Austin Miller

20th Mar 2018

Justice League (2017)

Question: What is the story behind the strange makeup blunders in Justice League? Early in the film, both Henry Cavill's and Ben Affleck's facial features seem oddly, almost creepily unrecognizable (in the smartphone sequence of Superman and in the private jet sequence with Bruce Wayne and Alfred). Also, Bruce Wayne's hair color seems to randomly change throughout the movie. As I understand it, between the directing upheaval and editing, many old scenes were deleted and new scenes added, requiring a lot of re-shooting. Is that the reason for the sloppy makeup continuity?

Charles Austin Miller

Answer: I don't know about the Ben Affleck portion of your question, but when the film was going back for reshoots, Henry Cavill had grown a mustache for his upcoming role in "Mission: Impossible Fallout" which he was contractually obligated to keep. The special effects crew had no choice but to digitally erase his mustache in post-production, which is why his mouth area looks so odd in some scenes (if you have seen the trailer for "Deadpool 2," Deadpool makes reference to this when he notes that the special effects for Cable's metal arm are not finished, and remarks that it's not like they are trying to remove a mustache). Interestingly, a person on YouTube posted a video of them removing Henry Cavill's mustache using a $500 computer, and it looks remarkably better than what this film did with a $300 million budget.

Serious B Premium member

Question: At the very end of the film, Tony Stark informs Peter Parker that he is a now a member of the Avengers and reveals his new Spidey suit. Peter moves toward the camera, with Tony Stark plainly visible on the right side of the screen and Happy Hogan far in the background (all three are in this shot), as we hear a male voice in the foreground enthusiastically say, "Yeah! Give that a look!" Except that Tony Stark didn't say it, Peter Parker didn't say it, and Happy Hogan was much too far away to have said it. The dubbed voice obviously does not belong to Tom Holland, Robert Downey Jr or Jon Favreau at all. So who said it?

Charles Austin Miller

Answer: Go back and watch the scene again. It looks like you just might be remembering it wrong. It's Tony during the tracking shot. He says "Yeah, give that a look!" in reference to the suit. He's actually not quite on camera when he says the line, hence you don't see him say it. But it's definitely Tony.

I re-watched the shot several times, Tony Stark does not visibly say anything, and the dubbed voice is not that of Robert Downey Jr.

Charles Austin Miller

I understand what you are saying. Tony isn't on screen during the line and the voice does sound different. The implication is that Tony is saying the line, without the line Tony is just standing there waiting for Peter to respond for a long time and it would be out of character for him to do so (he's an extremely talkative person). There isn't enough information available to determine whether or not Downey is actually the one who recorded the line, it could be him just recorded in post. But you are definitely correct, I listened to the scene with headphones on and there is a noticeable difference in the tone of voice for this one line and no others.

BaconIsMyBFF

20th Feb 2018

High Anxiety (1977)

Deliberate mistake: After the hotel murder, Brophy makes a series of photographic enlargements to prove Dr. Thorndyke's innocence. However, instead of holding his magnifying glass directly in front of his face as he examines the photos, Brophy angles the magnifying glass far to his right so the movie audience can see the magnifying glass details, but he can't possibly see anything.

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Charles Austin Miller

Continuity mistake: When the giant bronze statue, Talos, attacks the Argo, the crew flees across the beach and up the ship's boarding ramp, and one sailor chops through a mooring line so the Argo can escape. But, in subsequent shots as the Argo departs, no chopped-off mooring line remains on the wide-open beach, and there's nothing to which they could tie a mooring line, anyway.

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Charles Austin Miller

Trivia: Although released to theatres in 1966, this beautifully-shot film was actually the pilot for an unrealised television series entitled "House of Wax" (which was never picked up by the networks). Despite its title, "Chamber of Horrors" was not particularly scary, much less horrifying; in fact, it was more like a 19th Century crime-detective drama. After the TV pilot was rejected, Warner Brothers opted for a theatrical release, even though the film was shot in television screen format rather than wide screen format. Attempting to sensationalize "Chamber of Horrors" for the big screen, Warner Brothers added the preposterous "Fear Flasher and Horror Horn" gimmick to warn audiences of imminent violence and gore...except that there was no gore and practically no onscreen violence.

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Charles Austin Miller

Factual error: This film begins with a foreboding quote attributed to Edgar Allen Poe: "Sleep. Those little slices of death. How I loathe them." Problem is, Poe never wrote any such thing (and neither did Henry Wadsworth Longfellow), despite decades of misquotes and misattributions across the Internet. So, where did the quote actually originate? The answer is Walter Reisch, lead screenwriter on the 1959 film "Journey to the Center of the Earth." In Reisch's screenplay, the antagonist Count Arne Saknussemm is urged to get some rest, to which he memorably replies, "I don't sleep. I hate those little slices of death."

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Charles Austin Miller

Trivia: A naggingly familiar quote that has been attributed on the Internet to various authors (ranging from Edgar Allen Poe to Henry Wadsworth Longfellow) is "Sleep. Those little slices of death. How I loathe them." Problem is, Poe never wrote any such thing, and neither did Longfellow. The 1987 horror film "Nightmare on Elm Street III" seems to be the genesis of the misquote, which it incorrectly attributes to Poe. So, where did the actual quote originate? The answer is Walter Reisch, lead screenwriter on the 1959 film "Journey to the Center of the Earth." In the screenplay, the antagonist Count Arne Saknussemm is urged to get some rest, to which he memorably replies, "I don't sleep. I hate those little slices of death."

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Charles Austin Miller