Charles Austin Miller

Factual error: In Part Two, as Diana explains to Bruce Wayne the history of the Mother Boxes on Earth, we see an extended flashback of Earthly gods and warriors in epic battle against Darkseid. When Diana says, "A golden age of heroes fighting together," we see a closeup of an Amazon archer drawing back an arrow right-handed, leaning right, and releasing it. However, the arrow is UNSUPPORTED on the bow, so she couldn't possibly aim or control the arrow. A truly amateur mistake. (01:03:59)

Charles Austin Miller

Upvote valid corrections to help move entries into the corrections section.

Suggested correction: It's not even a matter of how good you are. Placing the arrow on the opposite side of your dominant hand is very much a Western style draw, popularized often times in Hollywood movies. Ancient and Eastern methods used a same side draw. It's mostly determined by the grip used and type of archery you're performing.

Bishop73

Nonsense. The physics of the draw demand that the arrow is supported on the riser. Even ancient Roman archers and American Indians supported their arrows on the bow. Again, go try it yourself. You can't hit diddly releasing an unsupported arrow on the wrong side of the bow.

Charles Austin Miller

Not this is the forum for it, but here's just 1 example. Https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=9cGSpYLdH8s.

Bishop73

Yes, it's possible to shoot same-side, as long as you're supporting the arrow with the bow. However, in the Justice League shot that I cited, the Amazon archer is holding the bow right-handed hunter style, with the bow tilted to the right, which means the arrow is totally unsupported and uncontrollable. There's this inconvenient force known as GRAVITY that pulls the arrow away from your intended trajectory when the arrow is unsupported.

Charles Austin Miller

Suggested correction: Incorrect. You can place the arrow either side of the bow. It depends on how good of an archer you are.

DBase

I've been an archer for over 40 years, and you don't load your arrow on the outside of your bow. I don't care "how good an archer" you THINK you are, you can't aim or control an unsupported arrow on the wrong side of the bow. Try it. Make a video of it. You'll be embarrassed to find you can't hit the broad side of a barn with the arrow on the wrong side of the bow.

Charles Austin Miller

Firstly, it's clearly possible: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8n5M2KHVyWI. Secondly, given the multiple "impossible" feats achieved by the Amazons given their super-physiology, "being able to accurately fire an arrow on the 'wrong' side of a bow" obviously falls under suspension of disbelief, and doesn't warrant either a mistake or the level of anger you're showing to people here.

Both videos state explicitly (especially Lars Andersen's) that yes, you CAN shoot from 'the wrong side', IF and only IF you use a particular, Eastern based grip, the thumb one. Watch the movie. She uses (which makes sense, for someone from the Greek mythology, I guess!) the 'Western style' so, left side as stated. I personally love over-analyzing this sort of things that give you so much insight and fun tidbits, rather than "Ah it's magic, who cares."

Sammo Premium member

7th Mar 2021

Die Hard (1988)

Video

Deliberate mistake: For Hans Gruber's iconic death scene, Alan Rickman's fall was filmed at high speed (for slow-motion playback) against a green screen, and the skyscraper perspective footage was added later as background. However, while Rickman falls away from the camera in slow motion, papers are fluttering around him in the background at normal speed. This was done deliberately to make the shot even more surreal.

Charles Austin Miller

Trivia: During the title sequence, as the camera is panning across all the clocks in Doc Brown's lab, we briefly see a simple electrical timer with its mechanical dial rapidly spinning. Electrical timer dials normally move at the same rate as a clock's hour hand, which is imperceptible. For this sequence, the timer's dial is spinning quickly as an inside tribute to the tabletop clock seen in the 1960 George Pal film, "The Time Machine" (the clock spun rapidly when the Time Machine was activated).

Charles Austin Miller

15th Feb 2021

The Void (2016)

Continuity mistake: Throughout the movie, fire axes seem to be the weapons of choice. Only two fire axes are used, but they appear recurrently. In the very first use, the protagonists use fire axes to butcher the monster Beverly. Blood and gore go everywhere; yet, the axes emerge from this bloodbath with no blood or gore on the handles - they're virtually pristine moments later. The axes are used again and again, right up to the ending, and blood comes and goes from the axe handles seemingly at random.

Charles Austin Miller

Revealing mistake: Steve Trevor approaches and stands before an oval, wall-mounted mirror, incredulously looking at himself and seeing a stranger's face in close-up. Steve finally smiles approvingly, turns to Diana Prince and says, "He's got it! Y'know, I like him!" The camera immediately cuts to two wide shots from behind Steve standing directly in front of the mirror (only a couple of feet away from it), but there is no reflection of Steve in the mirror at all. This error reveals that the "mirror" is actually a hole in the wall (a low-budget practical effect used in films of decades past for such mirror illusions). They probably filmed a lot more footage of Steve mugging in front of the "mirror" but edited it out, because this old-school effect is notoriously difficult to get exactly right. (00:49:50 - 00:50:20)

Charles Austin Miller

Upvote valid corrections to help move entries into the corrections section.

Suggested correction: They don't use this trick for the scene, the actor playing "the other guy" is standing in front of the mirror himself when you see him in the reflection, since he has black hair and Chris Pine does not. And Chris Pine can only be seen without the mirror. Later in the wide shots the angle of the mirror simply doesn't show Chris Pine's reflection. Only a tiny second at the start of the wide shot can you see it is actually a real mirror, when you see a piece of Chris Pine's hair in it.

lionhead

As I said, they probably filmed a lot more footage of Steve mugging in front of the "mirror" but edited it out. When Steve approaches the "mirror" in close-up, you can see that there are two distinct actors (which is the whole purpose of the scene): Chris Pine's hair is a distinctly different color and texture, and the actor in the "reflection" is taller. Plus, their subtle body and head movements are not perfectly synchronized, as would be the case in a true mirror-image. It's the old hole-in-the-wall trick.

Charles Austin Miller

But it is a real mirror, as it reflects his hair. So it's not a hole in the wall anyway. The back of the head you see when seeing "the other guy" in the mirror is that same guy's head, not Chris Pine's. No need to use that trick.

lionhead

No, the hair color and texture of the back-of-the-head shot are distinctly different from the guy in the reflection. The whole purpose of the shot is that Chris Pine in the foreground IS NOT the guy in the reflection in the background. The hair color and texture is different, and the guy in the reflection is taller; plus, the body and head movements are not synchronized. Go back and watch the scene (if you can stand watching the movie again).

Charles Austin Miller

Video

The Red Circle - S1-E4

Continuity mistake: A whimpering housemaid rushes down the stairway, frightened by an intruder on the second floor. Doctor Watson gallantly charges upstairs to investigate, plunging his left hand into the right side of his jacket to retrieve his trusty Webley revolver as he advances on the camera. However, the shot immediately cuts to Watson withdrawing the revolver with his right hand from the left side of his jacket. (00:29:55)

Charles Austin Miller

8th Dec 2020

Bullitt (1968)

Trivia: During the protracted 11-minute car chase scene between the Ford Mustang and Dodge Charger, we repeatedly see a number of the same incidental cars in background traffic. For examples: In addition to the green VW Beetle that magically reappears in several nonsequential shots, the same white 1968 Firebird also repeatedly appears (as many times as does the Beetle), and the same lavender Cadillac nearly collides head-on with the Charger at two different points in the chase. This is mainly because many of the shots had up to 8 cameras shooting from different angles, and there was a lot of redundant footage. So, the same cars noticeably kept popping up time and again (and the Charger somehow threw 7 or 8 hubcaps). These were all blatant editing problems; however, strangely enough, Bullitt still won the 1969 Academy Award for Film Editing. Go figure.

Charles Austin Miller

4th Dec 2020

Playgirl (1954)

[Fran Davis accidentally collides with a stranger on foot at the airport.]
Fran Davis: Sorry! We almost locked bumpers!
Stranger: [Leering at Fran's hourglass figure] If there's any damage to the chassis, I'll be glad to pay for repairs.
Fran Davis: Buster, you couldn't even pay for the headlights.

Charles Austin Miller

Trivia: Aside from his considerable talent and theatrical qualifications, the reason that Jeremy Brett's portrayal of Sherlock Holmes was so nuanced, meticulous and authentic is because the role was therapeutic to him. In real life, all throughout the various Granada Television series (from 1984 to 1994), Brett was plagued with manic-depression, erratic behavior and heart problems, from which he fatalistically felt he would never recover. Immersing himself in the mentally-disciplined character of Sherlock Holmes gave Brett much-needed focus and clarity in the last ten years of his life.

Charles Austin Miller

22nd Oct 2020

The Osbournes (2002)

Video

Trivia: Ozzy and Sharon Osbourne purchased a $6,300,000 mansion in Beverly Hills in 1999, three years before they starred in MTV's hit reality television show, "The Osbournes" (2002-2006). Bizarrely, the Prince of Darkness moved in next door to Pat Boone, the wholesome white bread Christian singing sensation of the 1950s and 1960s...and the two neighbors got on famously. Their neighborly friendship was such that Ozzy wanted to use Pat Boone's godawful 1997 cover of "Crazy Train" as the TV series theme song. MTV thought Boone would never agree to it, so they didn't even ask him; instead, MTV hired a Pat Boone impersonator to re-record the song. Later, MTV was amazed when Pat Boone himself said he would have gladly consented to them using his song, if they had only asked. Pat and Ozzy thought it was hilarious.

Charles Austin Miller

Factual error: Although actor Gary Busey was a professional rock and roll musician portraying one of the pioneers of Rock and Roll, Busey almost never plays a rock and roll riff in the entire movie. During his biggest scene in the Apollo Theatre sequence, for example, he holds a steady chord all the way through three songs, even as the music is rocking.

Charles Austin Miller

28th Aug 2020

Robocop (1987)

Trivia: Robocop nearly murders Clarence Boddicker at the cocaine factory but delivers the badly-beaten Boddicker to the police station and turns him in at the booking desk. Robocop says, "He's a cop killer," and all eyes in the station turn on Boddicker menacingly. At this point in the production, Director Paul Verhoeven and actor Kurtwood Smith discussed what to do next to show Boddicker's utter contempt for the police, even when he was in custody. The line "Just give me my fuckin' phone call" was added to the end of the scene, but Verhoeven and Smith still didn't think it was forceful enough, and they were at an impasse. So, on the last take, unbeknownst to the rest of the cast, Kurtwood Smith slipped a readily-available blood capsule into his mouth and unexpectedly spat the bloody mess onto the booking desk, right in front of the camera. The startled reaction of everyone on the set was genuine; even actor Robert DoQui, who played the sergeant at the booking desk, involuntarily recoiled in disgust and exclaimed, "Shit!" (which was kept in the movie). Clarence Boddicker thus ended up realistically intimidating the police, and Kurtwood Smith's improvisation made it an iconic scene.

Charles Austin Miller

17th Aug 2020

Blazing Saddles (1974)

Video

Trivia: As Sheriff Bart and The Waco Kid are first getting acquainted, The Kid demonstrates how fast he is by snatching a chess piece from the board before Bart can grab it. Even though Bart plainly captures the chess piece in both his hands, he is stunned to find the piece missing when he opens his hands again a moment later (all in the same shot). No special effects were necessary, because actor Cleavon Little used a simple tabletop magic illusion: As he clapped his hands together around the chess piece and drew it back from the table for a split second, he smoothly dropped the piece into his lap and then immediately opened his hands for the surprising reveal. (00:36:02 - 00:36:28)

Charles Austin Miller

14th Aug 2020

Justice League (2017)

Video

Factual error: The existing Justice League members realise that they cannot battle Steppenwolf without Superman, so they procure the last Motherbox to resurrect Superman from death. Unfortunately, the crippled Kryptonian spacecraft lacks sufficient power to activate the Motherbox. The Flash suggests that, given enough distance to accelerate, he can use his super speed to generate an enormous static electrical charge to activate the Motherbox. The problem with this scenario is that, although the Flash may generate a huge static electrical field at super speed, he is constantly discharging that static electricity, as we see every single time he exerts his power. As Flash races toward the Motherbox, gigantic arcs of electricity (easily hundreds of thousands of volts) pour off him, grounding to the spacecraft's bulkheads, thus neutralizing the static charge. Meaning that The Flash is not accumulating energy, he is discharging energy with every step; so, by the time he arrives at the Motherbox, he should have no more accumulated static electrical energy than if he started ten feet away from it.

Charles Austin Miller

Upvote valid corrections to help move entries into the corrections section.

Suggested correction: He said that he can "conduct a significant electrical current." At the moment he touches the cube, you can see the bolts sucking back into him and flowing into the cube. Also..."speed force."

DetectiveGadget85

Suggested correction: Under known physics, you are correct, however, The Flash can tap into the speed force, something that transcends known physics, which therefore makes his charging of the motherbox possible.

It doesn't matter what he is "tapping into" if he is still grounding-out to the ship's bulkheads and is discharging electricity the whole time.

Charles Austin Miller

Also the bulkheads are made of Kryptonian technology, being alien in nature maybe the discharged energy reacts differently and perhaps is reflected back into the Flash at a rate so fast that is imperceptible to the human eye. Like Bruce said the mother box is science beyond anything imaginable so we have to keep our mind open to possibilities regarding its properties.

Sorry but you are incorrect. According to you Barry shouldn't be able to run at all at high speed because physics. The speed force may as well be magic, as it defies physics in multiple ways i.e friction, gaining momentum the requirement for an equal opposite force to come to a rapid stop etc. Nevermind that it's canonical that they can generate and hurl lightning bolts.

4th Aug 2020

Star Trek (1966)

Assignment: Earth - S2-E26

Question: Did actor Robert Lansing ever make any comments on Star Trek in general or "Assignment: Earth" (TOS S2E26) in particular? His co-star in this episode/pilot, Teri Garr, had a sour, cynical and dismissive opinion of "Assignment: Earth" and Star Trek fandom (Starlog #173). But what was Robert Lansing's feeling about his experience on Star Trek? Did he like it, hate it, was he excited about the prospect of entering into the new "Gary Seven" series; or, like Teri Garr, was Lansing glad to put it behind him? I've never seen or heard anything about Lansing's personal views on the show.

Charles Austin Miller

Answer: Robert Lansing said, in an interview, he was reluctant to a television series. He was a Broadway actor and was snobbish about T.V. Especially science fiction shows, which were considered cheesy kiddie programs. But Gene was a friend of his and wrote the part specifically for him. So he did it and admitted to having fun with it.

Thank you, I've always wondered about that. Is there a link to the Robert Lansing interview? I'd be very interested to read it or view it (if it's a video).

Charles Austin Miller

21st Jul 2020

The Music Man (1962)

Video

Revealing mistake: During the July 4th festivities at Madison Park, Professor Harold Hill prompts four school board members (the Buffalo Bills quartet) into performing the song "Sincere," allowing Hill to slip away into the crowd. As they complete the last verse, the singers stroll into a wide shot with a fireworks display in the background. However, the skybursts are oddly magnified and erratically shift positions against the background, revealing that the fireworks display is a large but clumsily-edited rear-screen projection.

Charles Austin Miller

20th Jul 2020

The Music Man (1962)

Continuity mistake: Mayor Shinn thanks the crowd for attending the Fourth of July exercises indoors at the gymnasium due to "the weather being so chancy" (meaning a good probability of rain). Mayor Shinn adds that the July 4th fireworks display will be held that evening unless the rain prohibits it. However, the year is 1912, and no advanced weather-tracking technology exists; so, they have no way of predicting the weather except by direct observation. Therefore, the mayor must be basing his cautionary weather statements on direct observation of overcast and stormy conditions. But, when Professor Harold Hill works the crowd into an excited frenzy that bursts out of the gymnasium and into the streets, it is revealed that the sky is perfectly clear and blue, with the sun shining brightly. There is no indication of inclement weather whatsoever. In fact, it remains clear and never rains in River City throughout the course of the entire movie.

Charles Austin Miller

8th Jun 2020

Over The Top (1987)

Control - S1-E5

Revealing mistake: As Ed slowly backs away from the camera (from the foreground to the background), the towering Scrapper robot moves slowly forward (from the background to the foreground) to take Ed's place facing the camera. The lumbering robot is plainly casting a long shadow across this night-time shot towards the right side of the screen. But, as Ed and the giant robot pass one another, the CGI robot's shadow never falls across Ed at all. Throughout the shot, Ed remains uniformly illuminated, revealing that the digital-effects artist neglected to add the shadow passing over Ed. (00:38:55 - 00:39:19)

Charles Austin Miller

The Public Enemy mistake picture

Continuity mistake: Near the end, when Tom Powers is waiting in the rain to murder Schemer Burns, we see Tom wearing a tall, straight-crowned fedora that is only slightly tilted to his right. Suddenly, and for no apparent reason, we see a close-up of Tom wearing a completely different, taper-crowned fedora that is tilted deeply to his left. This close-up lasts for 7 seconds, then the shot returns to Tom wearing his original tall, straight fedora.

Charles Austin Miller

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