Answered questions about specific movies, TV and more

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Question: I swear that I remember Bond, on his way to Baltimore made love to the co-pilot, and when M says "he's well on top", that was because he was on top of the co-pilot making out...am I hallucinating?

Chosen answer: Pussy Galore was the pilot and he doesn't make out with her at that point. You may be thinking of Moonraker, where M asks Moneypenny if Bond is back from Africa, she replies "He's on the last leg of his journey," and it cuts to Bond romancing a woman in a plane.

Captain Defenestrator Premium member

Show generally

Question: Why was Boss Hogg trying to get his hands on the Duke farm?

Chosen answer: Various reasons, but mainly to drive the Dukes out of Hazzard County because the family have been foiling his schemes since his and Uncle Jesse's bootlegging days.

Captain Defenestrator Premium member

A Christmas Carol - S6-E1

Question: When The Doctor shows young Kazran his future, older Kazran touches his younger self. He did this without an explosion, however, in 'Doctor Who' it has been said that 'if you touch your younger self, it will create an explosion'. How did the older Kazran, in this episode, touch himself without an explosion?

Shadow5

Chosen answer: It creates a paradox, which isn't always an explosion, but can be. And it doesn't do it in this case for the same reason that the controls no longer operate for Kazran: The Doctor's intervention in his life has caused him to not be the same man he was before.

Captain Defenestrator Premium member

Question: In both Saw II and III we learn that Amanda is working for Jigsaw, after her test in the first movie. However I don't see the reason why she had to be in a game again, in Saw II. I was hoping that to be explained in Saw III, but apparently, it wasn't.Please enlighten me.

Chosen answer: In Saw V, Jigsaw explains to Hoffman that Amanda's purpose in the second game was make sure the others followed the rules.

Serious B Premium member

Question: Inigo shows Westley the sword his father made for the 6-fingered man ("I've never seen its equal"). How did Inigo acquire this sword? You would think that if Count Rugen was prepared to kill Domingo for the sword then he would have taken it with him.

Chosen answer: When Inigo was a child, Count Rugen came to Inigos father and requested a sword be made for him. When the sword was finished, Count Rugen refused to pay the price he originally offered for the sword. Inigos father refused to hand the sword over so Count Rugen killed Inigos father. Outraged, Inigo took the sword his father made and tried to kill Count Rugen. He has kept the sword ever since so he could use it to kill Count Rugen.

Answer: In the book, Count Rugen told the outraged villagers that Domingo had tried to rob him and he killed Domingo in self-defense. He couldn't very well take Domingo's sword after that.

Brian Katcher

Question: Is there anything that explains what Fudge and Malfoy were doing in the hall before the hearing began?

Chosen answer: According to the book, Malfoy was probably there to put the Imperius curse on Sturgis Podmore (a Ministry worker; part of the Order of the Phoenix; who was under an invisibility cloak), so as to make him get the prophecy out of the Department of Mysteries for him. Not to make himself look suspicious, Malfoy started up a conversation with Fudge regarding Harry's hearing when the latter was on his way to the court. Malfoy's main intention was to carry out the Dark Lord's instructions without arousing suspicion.

Show generally

Question: Does anyone know whether the coloured-in photos, which appear throughout the opening titles sequence, are real or made up for the show? If they ARE real, when George Wendt's name appears there's a shot of a man holding a newspaper with 'WE WIN' as the headline - does anybody know what this referred to?

Chimera Premium member

Answer: Here is the source of the "WE WIN" photo: http://www.oldnycphotos.com/nyny587ac.html Brooklyn, of all places.

Chosen answer: The pictures in the opening sequences are real pictures of people enjoying alcohol (from various dates), and are not meant to represent or include any of the cast members. The "we win" sign (most likely not a newspaper headline) is referring to the end of prohibition (1933) A fitting tribute to a show about drinking alcohol.

The word "Nazi" appears in the caption to a story underneath the headline. Maybe the headline refers to the Nazi surrender.

Season 3 generally

Question: Why was Sharona written out of the show? If it was Bitty Schram's choice then why did she quit?

Blibbetyblip

Chosen answer: As with most "he-said she-said" situations, we might never know. USA Network spokesman said the show was already planning on going a different direction with some characters. That said, Schram was trying to renegotiate her contract terms, but USA Network did not give in. For more of the story; here's an older news story http://www.today.com/id/5875714.

Question: What exactly was O'Connell arrested and sentenced to death for?

Socks1000

Chosen answer: Rick was purportedly sent to prison for deserting the French Foreign Legion. He was arrested after a bar fight, prompted by the pickpocketing of a certain Englishman.

Question: Throughout the movie, the Sarmatian knights shout the word "rus" at each other; Bors in particular says it a lot. Does anyone know what significance this word has or what it means?

Answer: At the beginning of the film, we learn that young Sarmatians were drafted into the Roman military for a period of fifteen years. As the Romans lead young Lancelot away from his family, his father yells 'Rus!', the war-cry that is repeated throughout the film. 'Sarmatian' was the name the Romans gave the Rus, descendants of Norsemen who had settled in lands that still bear their name today: the River Rus (in modern Romania), Russia, Belarus, and Ruthenia. Culturally and geographically, these people were the Rus. So when they were inducted into the Roman army, their war cry of 'Rus!' identified them as being fearsome Rus/Sarmatian warriors, warned their opponents that the Rus were coming for them, celebrated their cultural identity, and symbolized their hope of returning home to the Rus. In the film Arthur honors them by yelling it back, signifying the unusual bond between leader and soldier exemplified in the Round Table, Arthur's respect for the Rus warriors, and his commitment to the idea that all men are born free and have the right to their own lives and beliefs.

Chosen answer: Rus in Latin means country or land. The whole movie was based on winning freedom. Fighting and dying to win them their home, their country. Arturius chooses Britain as his land and his countrymen to defend. So Rus in this context, being they are Roman, their battle cry means 'for country', not Rome but Britain. For home.

Answer: They do not yell "rus", they shout as "rochs". In fact at first the pronunciation in the movie shows that. "Rochs" is a Sarmatian term, in fact it means "light" in modern Ossetian, the only remnants of the Sarmatians in modern world. There were three major Sarmatian tribes in history: Alans, Rochsalans (Rochs-alans or Latinized Roxalans) and Iazyges. Second one bears that prefix, and historically not Roxalans but Iazyges were forced to become mercenaries for Rome. So with that yell there is a little mistake in the movie but this is tolerable at the end.

Question: This is probably been asked over and over again, but please. Just why were these people stuck in a cube? Why them? Why not somebody else? Is this set in the future? Anybody with any details is helpful here.

Chosen answer: The 'victims' are put into the cube for different reasons... Some are death row inmates. Others are ex-employees or contractors and some are people who may 'know too much' and present a risk to the secrecy of the whole operation. Then there's the lab rats (Kazan in particular) who seem to be some kind of experimental test subjects (either for science or some sick fetish). Simon was put in there to hunt and kill an ex-employee of IZON. Sasha chose to go in to escape IZON. Kate works for IZON and was sent in to the hypercube to retrieve information and find a way out. As for whether it's set in the future or not is hard to say as there are not many clear references to to time period or location that don't seem a little contradictory, as if to say 'it doesn't matter where or when you are if you're in the cube'. The clothing worn by the characters in Hypercube is suggestive of modern fashion so it seems relatively present day, but having said that, the 'variable time-speed rooms' seem to be able to allow huge amounts of time to pass reasonably quickly (relative only to the subject who is affected). For example, Simon ages a good 20 years in 5 minutes, while Sasha and Kate (who didn't enter any variable time-speed rooms) seem unaffected by comparison. Poor Jerry is even made to have multiple failed attempts at the cube in a 'repeating time loop' that seems to follow him rather than being a feature of the cube itself. Cube Zero (the prequel) has technology and decor in the monitoring room reminiscent of the '50s but then has computers that surpass modern units, also, the technology behind the hatches, to traps and lighting seems advanced enough to be modern day. '50s clothing, modern lingo. It seems that time and location outside the cube has no relevance whatsoever to those inside it anyway. I think one of the reasons this trilogy is hugely popular is that it poses way more questions than it even bothers to try and answer. Hypercube in particular as it takes the concept of linear time-space, turns it inside out then doesn't even tell you why.

Question: How did the big hole get made? Is this a literal plot hole?

Chosen answer: The fallen tree that Ivy finds after she has managed to climb out of the hole is the cause of it. Clearly, from what dried up roots remain exposed above the ground at the base - it was huge - leaving a vast root system to rot in the ground; that then created the sinkhole. We see that the roots are so big Ivy hangs her bag on one and she uses it as a landmark in her mind - which we know is later beneficial.

Question: For the scene where Joker burns the money, he says he is only burning his half. However, with Gambol already dead, the Russian and Lau about to be killed and Maroni in absentia, is he actually burning all (or nearly all) the money? It seems to mirror the bank job (systematically eliminating the equal share) and in general the Joker's twisted sensibilities.

Chosen answer: The Joker was only burning his "half", which was the bottom half of the money pyramid (where he had the gasoline poured). The top half was the mob's, with Lau on top - in true Joker style, even though he only burned his "half", the mob's half also gets burned since it is on top (which is why the mob boss was pretty pissed off). It is but another joke of the Joker!

Question: When Angier tries out the machine in Tesla's burning lab, he creates a double of himself. One of them shoots the other, but who is the one who dies? I've seen this movie several times but still can't figure who is left standing - the copy or the original?

Chosen answer: It is impossible to know for sure if the machine creates a clone away from the machine or if it creates a clone in the machine while teleporting the original away from the machine. Even Angier himself could never know for sure, as the clone - having only just been created - would share Angier's memories up to that point of creation. Both the man in the machine and the man away from the machine have the EXACT same memories up until that point, so both could realistically claim to be the original. Tesla himself thought the machine not to work, until Angier stumbled upon the hats. The creator of the machine barely understood its function, so we never get clarification as to its specific workings. Angier points out in the end how he understood that by sharing the memories of the clone up until the moment of its creation, he (and thus we) could never know for sure if he would be the man in the box or the prestige.

Question: This has baffled me for ages. Instead of tolerating John Bender, why doesn't Richard Vernon simply get him expelled? Vernon must have realised that Bender was not only uncontrollable and a potential threat to him, but also someone who didn't care about his education and was disruptive to others. So why didn't he take the simpler option of getting him out of the school, as opposed to giving him countless detentions?

Gavin Jackson

Chosen answer: Vernon secretly cares about the kids. Pay attention to the scene where he talks to the janitor. He would rather see Bender stay in school and learn something instead of ending up in prison.

Question: Near the beginning of the film when Edward Norton and Meatloaf are hugging Edward's character says something along the lines of "things like this make me grow a big rubbery one". What does he mean by this, exactly?

Chosen answer: Sharing of feelings and hugs and crying are the antithesis of arousal. While something erotic or bad-ass might cause him to have an erection, this scene causes the opposite: a rubbery one would be a flaccid, unexcited penis, flopping around like rubber (not stiff). A mood killer.

Question: What about the morgue director? Was he in on it with Carson?

Brad Premium member

Chosen answer: At the end of the movie, the police ask Kyle to look at a photo to ID the morgue director. So he was in on it. He had to be because Gene/Carson didn't have the code to open the casket. Therefore he could not have put the explosives into the casket. Remember he needed Kyle to leave it open on the plane.

Time Waits for Norman - S2-E2

Question: What exactly did Jonathan and Maddie give to the tramp in exchange for information?

Socks1000

Chosen answer: It was a bottle of turpentine.

Question: What is the name of the song that comes on when Ben Affleck wakes up and turns on the radio?

Chosen answer: Hang on, by Seether.

Question: Doesn't the water tower fall completely to the ground during the buffalo stampede in the original theatrical release? It's missing in the DVD release.

Chosen answer: Footage of the water tower falling has NEVER appeared in the film. My first viewing of the film was in Cinerama in 1962 and the tower doesn't fall over. It doubtless was supposed to fall over but for technical reasons it didn't come out right, and so no footage beyond seeing it wobble a bit has ever been in the film.

New this month Answer: Yes, the water tower did indeed fall completely over in the initial release. I saw it fall all the way to the ground and release a flood of water. What happened was that the tower fell on the rump of one of the buffaloes, and the buffalo stumbled and got up and continued running. Later the animal rights people objected to the scene, so it was removed, and all that was left was the tower shown leaning over.

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