Answered questions about specific movies, TV and more

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Question: I know the first film had dialogue references to chapters of the book, such as "A Shortcut to Mushrooms" and "A Long Expected Party". Did this film have any such references?

Chosen answer: Not really, no. The chapter titles of The Two Towers tend to be relatively factual, like "Helm's Deep", which, while obviously said during the film, can hardly be considered a specific reference to the chapter title. The closest is probably Aragorn calling out "Riders of Rohan" when they encounter them on the plains - there is a chapter with this title (adding "The" to the beginning).

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: Is there a reason why Uma Thurman's handwriting is so clumsy? I was thinking it would have something to do with her getting shot in the head.

Chosen answer: Maybe it does or maybe she just has bad penmanship.

Tobin OReilly

Question: One of the trivia entry's mentions something about Go-Bots, who are they?

Chosen answer: Go-Bots were transforming-vehicle toys from around the same period, competition for (or rip-off of, depending on your opinion) the Transformers.

Xofer

Question: What do the castle guards pour on Mongo's head that gives him the foamy hair style and eventually causes his arms to break off?

Chosen answer: Steamed milk.

Paul Plesser

Question: What if they were to destroy the Matrix, then all the humans would be free but the problem is where would billions of human beings go? Zion, the last city, can't hold them all and they can't live in the tunnels or above the earth's crust because there is no food or water there. The whole war doesn't seem to be well thought out and seems like a big plot hole on the Wachowskis part.

Chosen answer: The inhabitants of Zion seem to have little problem with killing off dozens of 'real people' during their constant gunfights inside the Matrix. This suggests that they would be willing to sacrifice the bulk of humanity. Remember, it's supposed to be difficult for adults who spent their entire lives in the Matrix to survive being suddenly removed from it anyway.

J I Cohen

Show generally

Question: What does NID stand for?

Chosen answer: It stands for either National Intelligence Department, or National Intelligence Division, although it's never expressly stated on the show.

Answer: Fun fact: The producers were originally going to call the NID the "NRD" for "Not a Real Department", but changed it so they could make it mean something sensible if they ever needed to.

Question: At the beginning, Brad Pitt takes two tablets then somehow survives a massive electric shock. Are the tablets some form of stimulant to help his system recover (or some other form of genuine treatment), or is it just a fictional cinematic device?

Jon Sandys Premium member

Chosen answer: He might have taken a medical equivalent to a regulated dose of Curare, which can suspend the body temporarily in a coma-like state, while keeping the mind active and perceptive. It could also have been tetrodotoxin, which has remarkably similar effects, but lasts longer. In either case, they were specifically engineered for his physiology, indicating a pharmacologist's aid in their endeavor.

Question: Why was the ship that stopped in the front of the library empty? Did the crew abandon ship? Or was there something more sinister?

iceverything776

Chosen answer: Hard to tell why, it was not depicted. During heavy storms, most people would be on call, attending watches in the engine room and bridges. They probably died during the storm (several causes, as such heavy trashing, being swept away, the cold) etc., but their bodies were not shown, as it was irrelevant to the plot.

Question: Did that animal in Crematoria's prison (during the "feeding") have his eyes change (start glowing) after his contact with Riddick? I thought maybe I had missed something, but it looked like he/it had eyes like Riddick's after.

Michael Westpy

Chosen answer: The animals appear to be somewhere between a minor-class mimic of their surroundings and emotionally-triggered chameleons. As a sympathetic gesture towards Riddicks' dominant nature, it may have been altered purposely, or it was the animals' native eye color, when unstressed.

Question: I'm curious to know how people in Russia, the Ukraine, and other parts of the former Soviet Union feel about this movie. Do they detest it, love it, like it... do they think any part of it is an exaggeration? Where could I go to see their opinions on Miracle?

Matty Blast

Chosen answer: My name is Anastasiya and I am from Moscow, Russia. I am married to an American and we visited his family in New York, America and saw the movie Miracle in the theatre. My opinion on the movie was very good. I thought it was a good movie and although their views on the Soviets weren't very good at parts, I think that was how it really went and I think it was true to the real story. Overall, I liked the movie, and it was not hurtful in any way to me at all, as a Russian. Sincerely, Anastasiya Yakovlev-Burke

Question: The scene where Lucy is at the mental institution and she's drawn Henry a million times, did that actually happen?

Chosen answer: Yes, it did happen: right as it did in the movie. Henry was on the boat, thought that Lucy remembered him, turned around, went into the hospital, and saw the paintings. But the movie then skipped many years into the future and showed Lucy and Henry about, maybe 5 years later on the boat in Alaska. It was shown like this so you would know how they got back together, but they also wanted you to see how they ended up. Hope this helps, it took me a while to figure this out anyway!

Question: In at least one scene of the NYC mayor's office/residence, the flag on the other side of her desk from the U.S. flag appears to be the flag of Mexico. Is this correct?

scwilliam

Chosen answer: That's the flag of New York City - see http://flagspot.net/flags/us-nyc.html. While it does look similar to Mexico, the Mexican flag is green, white, and red instead of blue, white, and red.

Question: When Sam rips open the web on Frodo's face that Shelob made, what are those little black spots on Frodo's face?

Chosen answer: Dirt. You try crawling through swamps, up mountains and through a spider's cave and not get dirty.

Question: Why did the treasure chest given to them at the end have "Deus Ex Machina" written on it?

Dandude776 1

Chosen answer: "Deus Ex Machina" means "God out of the machine." It's from Greek plays, wherein a god would appear at the end of the story to solve a problem. Nowadays it basically means that a totally new plot element appears out of nowhere and solves everything. It's an easy (and cheap) way out.

Question: What is the kiss on the side of Wendy and her mother's mouth?

Chosen answer: It is a dimple that only shows when she smiles. It is there to be found by the one who can make her smile, better known as someone you love.

Question: When are heroes encounter the Merovingian in the club, what is it he says to them in french?

Chosen answer: He says Quel Grand Surprise which translated means what a big surprise.

Question: Does anyone know the name of the character that shows Beck into the night club in the beginning?

MoonFaery Premium member

Chosen answer: I've rewatched the scene and as far as I can tell, the character is never named.

Question: I read that the character of Arwen is different in the film adaptation than from the books (including "Fellowship of the Ring"). In what ways? Second, did director/screenwriter Peter Jackson gave a reason why he expanded Arwen's presence in the film adaptation? Was it done for marketing purposes as some fans had claimed?

megamii

Chosen answer: Well, Arwen in the books really doesn't do a great deal - she's an extremely minor character. The first reason for increasing her role was simply to remove some of the myriad other characters from the book - for example, the elf Glorfindel, who, in the book, is the one who brings Frodo to Rivendell, then never appears again. Considering the sheer number of characters in the tale, it makes a certain sense to combine them occasionally. The second reason, and why they chose to use Arwen at this point, is that it fleshes out her character a bit, giving us a glimpse of her strength and power and allowing us to get a better glimpse at her relationship with Aragorn, making it clearer why he would love her. It has also given the tale another strong female character, which, yes, isn't bad for marketing purposes, but that consideration wasn't the primary reason for doing so.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: Lord Denethor is not the king of Gondor, but a steward, a caretaker of the throne according to Gandalf. Does this means that he is acting as a regent?

megamii

Chosen answer: Effectively, yes - the Stewards rule in the absence of the rightful King of Gondor. That being said, the Stewards have now ruled Gondor for 26 generations of their family and believe the bloodline of the King to be destroyed, so, as we see with Denethor, they pretty much consider themselves to be the true rulers of the kingdom these days. As such, while they are technically fulfilling the role of regent, they might not actually consider that to be the case any more.

Tailkinker Premium member

Thirty Minutes Over Tokyo - S10-E23

Question: When the fish offers Bart 3 wishes, what is that a take off of?

Chosen answer: Pretty much any fairy tale where somebody gets offered wishes by a genie or other similar character. It's always three wishes (and, nine times out of ten, the last one gets used to undo the damage caused by the first two).

Tailkinker Premium member

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