Rob245

1st Sep 2020

Halloween (1978)

Question: Three here: 1. Does Myers pick Laurie for any specific reason? 2. His mask symbolic or something? 3. Why waste time killing Annie and Lynda if he was fixated on Laurie?

Rob245

Answer: The movie doesn't provide any reason why he targets the three girls, which I think is a wise decision, but you can interpret that Myers chose those three because of Annie's "Speed kills!" wisecrack. It was enough to get him to stop the car. Good enough reason as any.

Answer: (1) In the context of the movie, no. Michael is, as Loomis puts it, "purely and simply evil." He pretty much picks the girls as a target seemingly at random after Laurie drops the keys off at the Myers house. While future movies tried to provide him with a reason (such as saying Laurie is Michael's sister in "Halloween 2"), in this movie, it's pretty much just because Michael is a psychopath and they just so happened to become his target. That's part of what makes him so scary in this film. (2) The mask was picked by the filmmakers because it was the most unsettling. (A clown mask was also considered.) It also had the added bonus of having a vacant, emotionless face that also happened to reflect Michael's vacant, emotionless state. (3) Michael is a psychopath and simply decides to kill all of the girls and save Laurie for last for reasons unknown.

TedStixon

I think Michael zeroed in on the 3 girls from when Annie yelled at him while they were walking home from school.

1st Sep 2020

Face/Off (1997)

Question: Why wasn't Castor Troy cuffed to the bed and watched by several agents? And how did he know which agents knew of the switch and thus kill only them?

Rob245

Answer: For the first question, in the chance that he did wake up (which he did). He's a very dangerous man in a coma and could wake up and escape if not watched or cuffed. Second question, he would have watched the video seen when the doctor comes in and saw which agents were there, as well as would have tortured the information out of the doctor about it.

Quantom X Premium member

Good answer to the second question, but the first one asked why Troy WASN'T watched and cuffed. In the film, he wakes up alone and unrestrained.

Ah fair point. I misread and miss remembered a little bit. I'll have to see it again as it's been a while then.

Quantom X Premium member

1st Sep 2020

Halloween 4 (1988)

Question: Did Jamie acting like Michael at the movie's end happen because of the night's events, or when she touched his hand, or what?

Rob245

Answer: I think it's really up to the viewer to decide. I personally always took it as she simply snapped and briefly lost her mind and became just like her uncle for an instant. But given she and Michael share a psychic connection in the sequel, I've seen other people suggest that perhaps she was under his "influence" in some way.

TedStixon

Answer: You would need to be more specific as to which inmate to get an answer as to who possibly belongs in the mental ward. In general; usually the only mentally ill prisoners who go to the mental ward are inmates who show obvious psychotic breaks like Loli and crazy eyes as, with the conditions of prison, it's often difficult to tell who is mentally ill and whose frustrated from the conditions. Many of them are also only there temporarily. Crazy Eyes, first example, was in the mental ward. Her mother fought and won to get her out.

1st Sep 2020

Halloween 5 (1989)

Revealing mistake: Notice when Michael comes up out of the water at the hermit's hut. He has a bulge on his back, likely a safety harness or padding of some kind.

Rob245

1st Sep 2020

Carrie (1976)

Question: Why did they change her name from Rita Desjardin, in the book, to Miss Collins?

Rob245

Answer: The only answer I could find online was that it was changed simply because "Miss Collins" was easier to pronounce/remember. It's also worth noting that it's really not all that uncommon for movie adaptations to alter and rename characters. Especially supporting characters. Given there are some other changes to the character in the movie, renaming her could have also been a way to distance her more from the character in the original book.

TedStixon

Question: What does Tex mean by "I'm as real a donut motherf'r?"Something significant?

Rob245

Answer: To put some context into the scene, three members of the Manson family (Tex included) have broken into Rick Dalton's house and are holding Cliff Booth at gunpoint. Cliff, who is high on drugs asks "Are you real", to which Tex replies "I'm as real as a donut, mother fucker." Tex was trying to answer Cliff's question stating whether or not he was real, but in the most intimidating way possible, and I guess donut was the word that came to mind that described how real he was.

Casual Person

Answer: I'm not sure if they ever did but there's an episode with flashbacks and all of Lois' pregnancies. When Lois was pregnant with Malcolm, Hal used to do early stimulation exercises for Reese, it's proven that children who were stimulated early get higher IQ's. There's a line Louis says to Hal in that episode, something like: "He calls your phone. I don't know who is this helping, but not Reese", and then they do a close up to her belly, implying that's how Malcolm got so smart. But turning back to which side, probably Hal's side cause his father is kind of rich and successful as is most of his family which is why they didn't like Hal marring Lois. Ida and Victor were just farmers back in their country.

Answer: It's ambiguous. Most likely both were targeted to be killed.

raywest Premium member

31st Aug 2020

Live and Let Die (1973)

Answer: She is an Obeah woman, a type of sorceress. In this movie's universe, an Obeah woman's power is supposedly tied to being a virgin.

raywest Premium member

31st Aug 2020

Halloween (2018)

Question: What's his motivation for going after Laurie after all these years? That and why transfer him?

Rob245

Answer: You could argue that Laurie is "unfinished business" for Michael, since she escaped him years ago. But it's important to note that in the movie, Michael doesn't seem to be going after her specifically at first. He arrives in town and just begins to start randomly killing people again. He doesn't really go after Laurie until the doctor specifically drives him to her neck of the woods, because he (the doctor) is obsessed with the idea of Michael and Laurie encountering each other again. So there is also the chance that she wasn't really Michael's target at all. I think it's kind of purposely left ambiguous what Michael's "goals" are in the film. As for the second question, it's answered in the opening scene - he's been at the hospital to be studied. But the state has lost interest in the case since no real developments have occurred. So rather than wasting more time/resources on him, they're instead dumping him into a maximum security facility where he'll basically be left to rot.

TedStixon

31st Aug 2020

Halloween 4 (1988)

Question: There's talk of Rachel having to cancel her date with Brady. Why couldn't he just go along with her taking Jamie trick or treating?

Rob245

Answer: Rachel probably doesn't want to ruin his whole Halloween night by making him a third wheel. She likely figures they can just reschedule and he can find other stuff to do since it's a holiday. There's also the chance they had other certain "things" planned that they couldn't do around Jamie.

TedStixon

31st Aug 2020

Halloween 4 (1988)

Question: Why transfer him at night in bad weather? That and given his past why not have him cuffed to the gurney and have armed guards there regardless of his comatose state?

Rob245

Answer: The best in-universe answer I could give you to your first question is that Michael just happened to be scheduled to be transferred at night and the weather ended up being crummy. I've been transferred between hospitals at night before. (Albeit, I'm not a homicidal maniac.) But honestly, the real answer is simply... "because movie." It's a horror movie - it's just more dramatic for the scene to be set at night during lousy weather. It wouldn't be nearly as effective a scene if it was during the day in nice weather. A dark, stormy night is sort-of a convention of the genre. As for the second question, he was severely burned in a fire and has been in a comatose state for years and years. Realistically, it was safe to assume he wouldn't wake up, and even if he did, a normal person's muscles would have likely softened into jelly in the meantime. They assumed they'd be safe... but they were wrong.

TedStixon

The question would be why did the characters transfer him at night in bad weather, not why did the film makers set it up like that. The viewer may thought he or she missed the in-film explanation or was looking for someone with expertise in transferring patients to provide an answer. And again, was there any in-film explanation given or persons with experience in transporting patients like Michael (albeit without supernatural powers). Pointing out the caveat of character's actions isn't realistic because it was scripted that way is fine, but pointing out that a movie is a movie isn't a valid answer (or correction).

Bishop73

I did amend my answer slightly before I saw your response. I really don't think my initial answer was that invalid though. That's honestly the truth - it was done that way for dramatic purposes, and any other answer would be pure speculation.

TedStixon

If no in-film explanation is given, speculation is OK as long as it aligns with something that would happen in real life (although I would suggest saying it's speculation). Sometimes people do ask question about why film makers would do something, and an answer like "to make it more dramatic" would be acceptable.

Bishop73

31st Aug 2020

Texas Chainsaw 3D (2013)

Question: Just who all are all those other Sawyers in the opening scene? I saw The Cook and Grandpa but who were the rest and why were they there?

Rob245

Answer: We are to presume they are extended family members and/or associates of the family that we simply didn't see in the original film.

TedStixon

20th Aug 2020

Kiss the Girls (1997)

Question: Given they probably do psych evaluations before people become cops how did Casanova slip in?

Rob245

Answer: Unfortunately, a functioning psychopath might be able to pass a basic psych evaluation. There are several real life examples of serial killer policemen.

BaconIsMyBFF

20th Aug 2020

Halloween 5 (1989)

Question: Why does Jamie calling him uncle stop him? That and why honor her request to see his face?

Rob245

Answer: Sorry about that and thank you.

Rob245

Answer: The question was more-or-less answered in a previous question, so I'll copy part of my answer here: Director Dominique Othenin-Girard made the puzzling decision to try and humanize Michael in this film by showing he still had some traces of emotion that could be momentarily reached. Thus when Jamie talks to him, he briefly recovers his humanity, takes off his mask and sheds a single tear. Basically, Othenin-Girard felt it made Michael scarier by showing his humanity could be momentarily "reached." Of course, it really doesn't make sense and contradicts the other films... but it was just a decision the director made.

TedStixon

20th Aug 2020

The Munsters (1964)

Answer: The comedic gimmick of both "The Munsters" and "The Addams Family" television shows in the 1960s was that both families were convinced they were normal and everyone else they encountered was odd. The Addams Family, for example, thought their "normal" visitors were mentally unbalanced because they always fled the Addams' weird home in panic. That was a running gag throughout the entire Addams Family series, so much so that easily half of nearly every episode was devoted to the predictably terrified reactions of their visitors (always accompanied by identical canned laughter). Meanwhile, in the Munsters' universe, the family thought "normal" people were physically deformed and even quite hideous. For example, the Munsters believed that their beautiful niece, Marilyn, was socially handicapped by her ugliness (the exact opposite of the truth); and, in the episode "Just Another Pretty Face" (S2E17), when Herman Munster was temporarily transformed into a "normal" person, his entire family found him utterly repulsive. The family's hidden revulsion to "normal" people was the running gag of The Munsters.

Charles Austin Miller

Answer: They do not see themselves as being the different ones.

raywest Premium member

20th Aug 2020

Halloween 4 (1988)

Answer: It's tricky to say, as the films have contradictory explanations, and there are different "timelines/universes" in the series. But in the context of this film, Michael is for some reason compelled to kill his family for reasons unknown. Presumably he's just finishing the job he started by killing his sister Judith decades earlier. (They try to give a more concrete explanation in the movie "The Curse of Michael Myers," but it's... flimsy at best. And is contradicted by the following film).

TedStixon

20th Aug 2020

Halloween (2007)

Continuity mistake: Michael goes to his last meeting with Loomis bare faced and wearing a robe. Then he's sitting there not wearing the robe and wearing a mask.

Rob245

20th Aug 2020

Halloween 4 (1988)

Continuity mistake: When Jamie backs up into Michael in the drug store his hands are at his sides.Yet when she looks up at him he's putting on his mask.

Rob245

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