Seinfeld
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The Dealership - S9-E11

Continuity mistake: When George is at the window making a complaint, a cut reveals several inconsistencies. The man at the window has his arms in a higher position in the second shot (plus his facial expression is changed), the woman no longer has her hand up on the wall, and George's left hand is suddenly resting on the table. (00:15:55)

Mechanic1c

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The Reverse Peephole - S9-E12

Continuity mistake: Kramer is holding his hands in front of him with a back scratcher in his left hand, and then suddenly after a cut his hands are not up and we don't see him holding a back scratcher. He proceeds to close the door with his left hand, which is now holding nothing. (00:05:25)

Mechanic1c

The Fire - S5-E20

Continuity mistake: When Kramer is talking with Elaine and her coworker in the publishing office, his cigar appears and disappears between shots, as well as switches from his hand to his mouth in others, and from lit to not lit in others. (00:01:05)

Mechanic1c

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The Fire - S5-E20

Continuity mistake: When George is with his girlfriend at the coffee shop, the ketchup bottle on the table switches between being knocked over and stood up in different shots, despite nobody ever touching it. (00:03:10)

Mechanic1c

The Voice - S9-E2

Kramer: They're redoing the Cloud Club.
Jerry: Oh, that restaurant on top of the Chrysler Building? Yeah, that's a good idea.
Kramer: Of course it is. It's my idea.
Jerry: Which part? The renovating the restaurant you don't own part, or the spending the two hundred million you don't have part?

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Trivia: No matter who the characters in Seinfeld call, they never have to look up the phone number in the phone book. They have the phone numbers to every restaurant, hotel, and business memorised.

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Answer: Composer Jonathan Wolff used a synthesizer, although in seasons 7-9, a real bass is used in addition. Wolff also recorded himself making hundreds of mouth noises, pops, and slaps to add to the synthesized bass licks so that each episode has a different theme. The only real "back-story" is Jerry Seinfeld was having trouble coming up with a theme song and talked to a friend who happened to know Wolff. They wanted to avoid that cheesy late 80's sit-com theme song and Wolff came up with what we enjoy now. Jonathan Wolff has also talked about this further in interviews, recently Reed Dunela interviewed him, so for a fuller account of his story; check out "The Wolff of 116th street".

Bishop73

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