Seinfeld

The Suicide - S3-E15

Revealing mistake: In this episode when Jerry leaves his room to talk to his neighbour about their fight, when he shuts his door the wall shakes revealing that the place he lives in is not a real apartment.

Video

The Shower Head - S7-E16

Revealing mistake: When Kramer is getting slammed with his new super-powered shower head at the very end of the episode, it's blatantly obvious that the water is barely touching him - he's standing right next to it.

The Bookstore - S9-E17

Revealing mistake: When Kramer at the start of the episode puts the hose on the kitchen tap, he jerks the hose as it's not long enough to reach The Fire. If you look at the sink when Kramer does this, it comes easily out of its position on the counter top.

Lummie Premium member

The Ex-Girlfriend - S2-E1

Revealing mistake: After the scene in which Elaine tells Jerry about her confrontation with the "head-nodding" man, and before the scene where George swallows a fly, the scene cuts to a shot of the exterior of Monk's café. The actual, real-life restaurant used for exterior purposes is named "Tom's Restaurant," and the "m's" in "Tom's" can be seen during this five-second shot. (00:23:00)

The Pen - S3-E3

Revealing mistake: While Jack is leaving The Apartment after giving Jerry The Pen, you can see they have put a fake background outside the front door. What's more it is not even that realistic. It looks like a forest with a river in the middle. The Seinfeld's Florida apartment is situated amongst many other apartments around it.

Lummie Premium member

The Abstinence - S8-E9

Revealing mistake: When Kramer and his lawyer, Jackie, are in the taxi; when Jackie says "who told you to have a pow wow", a man is seen walking across the rear window. The taxi is supposed to be moving, but the man's position stays the same (the taxi should be pulling away from him). The actual traffic filmed for the green screen doesn't seem to react to a man jaywalking in front of them either, as it was someone walking across the set.

Bishop73

Seinfeld mistake picture

The Baby Shower - S2-E10

Revealing mistake: In the sequence when he gets shot by the FBI agents for stealing cable, Jerry Seinfeld is wearing ear buds, quite visible when he collapses by the door. Evidently the stage props even loaded with blanks were too loud for his taste. (00:09:00)

Sammo Premium member

The Old Man - S4-E18

Revealing mistake: After The Old Man's dentures are destroyed in the garbage disposal, he shouts that his dentist is "downtown." There is sibilance audible in his production of the T sound (after the stop release). Sibilance is high frequency noise cause by turbulent airflow directed at the front teeth vibrating randomly in a small space; if he had no front teeth, there should be no sibilance. (00:14:35)

Mechanic1c

The Blood - S9-E4

Revealing mistake: When Kramer is driving his Tupperware full of blood in Jerry's car, you can tell by how rapidly The Blood is oscillating that it is just red-colored water. As the saying goes, blood is thicker than water, so actual blood wouldn't oscillate that rapidly, especially when it had just been pulled from a freezer. (00:18:20)

Phaneron Premium member

The Heart Attack - S2-E8

Revealing mistake: When the two paramedics get off the van to duke it out, look at George lying down in the stretcher. The pillow behind him bears in the last two shots faint purple coloring marks washed out from Jaso Alexander's makeup. (00:18:30)

Sammo Premium member

The Baby Shower - S2-E10

Revealing mistake: It's just a parody/absurd sequence, but it's odd that with over two dozen bullets shot from barely a dozen feet of distance, just a couple entry wounds appear on the body of the runaway Seinfeld. Of course no blood either, but that's a necessity given the type of show. (00:08:55)

Sammo Premium member

Upvote valid corrections to help move entries into the corrections section.

Suggested correction: It's a dream sequence. It doesn't have to follow the rules of reality. I frequently have dreams that logically make no sense.

Phaneron Premium member

I know, I know, but never been a big fan of giving a free pass to dream sequences for things like continuity, poor stunts etc. If anything, it'd get a pass because it's a comedy and violence and realism are toned down by default.

Sammo Premium member

The very nature of dreams give them a free pass for just about anything. I will have dreams where I'm talking to a certain person or holding a certain object, and in the next moment the person will be someone else or the object will be something else. I have dreams where I am back in high school and the layout of the building will frequently change, or the class I go into will change subjects. If you put that to film, it would be a change in continuity.

Phaneron Premium member

What you say is true for dream sequences played specifically with the purpose to give the viewer a sense of disorientation, experience something obviously 'off', a deliberately disjointed and creative scenario that breaks reality. As I said, I am not a fan of being unable to nitpick scenes or even movies who happen all in someone's head for trivial mistakes that are not something as amazingly obvious as the ones you explained. Your examples are something the viewer would notice and would register as deliberate choice and part of the plot, but Seinfeld wearing earbuds or 2 gunshot wounds instead of a dozen are not really something I can put in the same category. If the dream scene is played 'straight', as that one has been, I don't believe we have to just assume that any take can be edited together since continuity is not an issue, props and tricks can be visible or act weird because who knows what can happen in a dream, etc.

Sammo Premium member

You make a fair point (which is also why I didn't submit a correction for your separate entry of Jerry wearing ear protection). However, the basis of this submission is that Jerry only has a couple entry wounds and no bleeding after being shot numerous times. That can just be chalked up to how his mind dreamed the scenario. I don't think a sense of disorientation or something being off needs to be established (especially when the sequence is played for laughs) for viewers to accept details like that can suddenly change within a dream since we all dream and understand that those things happen.

Phaneron Premium member

Not necessarily "established" but "with purpose", which can be seen in hindsight. Anything can happen in a dream, but if he imagined to be shot in such a dramatic fashion so many times and die, the fact that he dies with a cheap effect is hardly serving any narrative purpose. Again, I could see why ultimately the mistake could be seen as stating the obvious since "the scene is played for laughs", which was my first caveat posting the scene, the last being the lack of blood for censorship purposes. They didn't thoroughly cover Jerry Seinfeld with squibs and things like that just for a gag - explanation of the 'mistake' rather than justification, but fair. But as far as the dream goes, the point of that dream scene is to do something more 'violent' and unexpected than you'd see in the 'real life' scenes, not tone it down through a marginal detail that has a clear explanation.

Sammo Premium member

The Hot Tub - S7-E5

Plot hole: When Elaine is searching for Jean Paul in the streets, one of her verbal flashbacks is of Jean Paul saying, "I trust Elaine, she is my friend." However, Jean Paul made this remark to Jerry, and Elaine was not there to hear it. How could she have a flashback of it?

More mistakes in Seinfeld

The Jimmy - S6-E19

Jimmy: Oh yeah, Jimmy's ready. Check Jimmy out. Jimmy's got some new moves. [Slips and falls from the water.] Jimmy's down.

Bishop73

More quotes from Seinfeld
More trivia for Seinfeld

Answer: Composer Jonathan Wolff used a synthesizer, although in seasons 7-9, a real bass is used in addition. Wolff also recorded himself making hundreds of mouth noises, pops, and slaps to add to the synthesized bass licks so that each episode has a different theme. The only real "back-story" is Jerry Seinfeld was having trouble coming up with a theme song and talked to a friend who happened to know Wolff. They wanted to avoid that cheesy late 80's sit-com theme song and Wolff came up with what we enjoy now. Jonathan Wolff has also talked about this further in interviews, recently Reed Dunela interviewed him, so for a fuller account of his story; check out "The Wolff of 116th street".

Bishop73

More questions & answers from Seinfeld

Join the mailing list

Separate from membership, this is to get updates about mistakes in recent releases. Addresses are not passed on to any third party, and are used solely for direct communication from this site. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Check out the mistake & trivia books, on Kindle and in paperback.