Seinfeld

The Burning - S9-E16

Continuity mistake: At the beginning of the episode, when Puddy is farewelling Elaine on the street, he is standing on the sidewalk and leaning through the driver's window. The following shot when she pulls out quickly, you can see through the windows of the car that Puddy is nowhere to be seen.

Lummie

Seinfeld mistake picture

The Slicer - S9-E7

Continuity mistake: When Elaine is woken up by her neighbor's alarm she looks at her own bedside alarm clock and it shows 3.30 AM. In the next shot when she buries her face in her pillow and screams, that clock shows 3.29 AM. (00:00:50)

The Library - S3-E5

Continuity mistake: When Bookman is lecturing Jerry in his apartment, he picks up a navy book with gold lettering and places it on the bookshelf in front of a pink book. For the rest of the shots, the navy book disappears and the pink book is back in front.

Steph_Jared

The Note - S3-E1

Continuity mistake: At the beginning of the show, when Jerry is having a massage, his hands are in front of him, under his chin. The position of his fingers change considerably after The Masseuse says, "I don't know" but then return to the original position in the next shot.

The Calzone - S7-E20

Continuity mistake: This mistake is in The Calzone episode. Towards the end when George walks in and his boss is looking around for the smell of calzones, George is holding a bag in his hand. In the next shot that shows the back of the boss's head the bag is now on top of a box that George is carrying. When it goes back to a close up the bag is in his hand again.

The Heart Attack - S2-E8

Continuity mistake: When Jerry's sitting with George in the hospital talking about George's jacket, as Jerry says "no, I tried it on, it fits good", he's gesturing with his left hand, which he then puts in his lap. From the reverse angle though, his left hand's still raised, then he lowers it again.

Jon Sandys

Season 1 generally

Continuity mistake: Jerry's apartment in the first episode was on the fourth floor. Then in the next bunch of episodes it was 3A. It then changes to 5A for the remainder of the series.

The Susie - S8-E15

Continuity mistake: Towards the end of the episode, it transitions between the Yankee ball at night and "Susie's" wake which is during the day.

The Pitch - S4-E3

Continuity mistake: In this episode, George asks Russell if his last name contains a "y" and Russel answers that it doesn't. However, Russel is credited in this and subsequent episodes as "Russell Dalrymple."

Upvote valid corrections to help move entries into the corrections section.

Suggested correction: He was being curt with George and said "no" on purpose to drop the subject of how is last name is spelt. When George spelled his name, he was pretty close to spelling it correctly and Russell said"not even close", which we know isn't true.

Bishop73

The Dog - S3-E4

Character mistake: When George and Elaine go to the coffee shop after The Movie without Jerry, they establish that Elaine moved to NYC in 1986. Then they make fun of the way that Jerry throws up; both imitating Jerry. The "Dinner Party" episode is after the "The Dog". In the "Dinner Party" episode, Jerry brags that he hasn't thrown up since June 29th, 1980. The black and white cookie ended this streak. Elaine would not have been around to see this, not arriving in NYC until 1986.

More mistakes in Seinfeld

Kramer: It's a write off for them.
Jerry: Write it off what?
Kramer: They just write it off.
Jerry: You don't even know what a write off is, do you?
Kramer: Do you?
Jerry: No, I don't.
Kramer. Well they do, and they're the ones writing it off.
Jerry: I wish I had the last 20 seconds of my life back.

More quotes from Seinfeld

Trivia: No matter who the characters in Seinfeld call, they never have to look up the phone number in the phone book. They have the phone numbers to every restaurant, hotel, and business memorised.

More trivia for Seinfeld

Answer: Composer Jonathan Wolff used a synthesizer, although in seasons 7-9, a real bass is used in addition. Wolff also recorded himself making hundreds of mouth noises, pops, and slaps to add to the synthesized bass licks so that each episode has a different theme. The only real "back-story" is Jerry Seinfeld was having trouble coming up with a theme song and talked to a friend who happened to know Wolff. They wanted to avoid that cheesy late 80's sit-com theme song and Wolff came up with what we enjoy now. Jonathan Wolff has also talked about this further in interviews, recently Reed Dunela interviewed him, so for a fuller account of his story; check out "The Wolff of 116th street".

Bishop73

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