Seinfeld

Answer: Composer Jonathan Wolff used a synthesizer, although in seasons 7-9, a real bass is used in addition. Wolff also recorded himself making hundreds of mouth noises, pops, and slaps to add to the synthesized bass licks so that each episode has a different theme. The only real "back-story" is Jerry Seinfeld was having trouble coming up with a theme song and talked to a friend who happened to know Wolff. They wanted to avoid that cheesy late 80's sit-com theme song and Wolff came up with what we enjoy now. Jonathan Wolff has also talked about this further in interviews, recently Reed Dunela interviewed him, so for a fuller account of his story; check out "The Wolff of 116th street".

Bishop73

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Question: During one episode, Jerry is dating a woman who's name he can't remember, but it rhymes with the name of a part of a woman's body. At the end he yells out the name to her down on the street. What is the name?

shortdanzr Premium member

Answer: The name is Delores. He shouts that name at the end of the episode. Then in a later episode, "The Foundation", he runs into her. And he repeatedly calls her Delores.

Answer: No, it is not. Most Seinfeldians believe Newman is simply jealous of Jerry's success, and doesn't feel Jerry is worthy of it.

DavidRTurner

Answer: In s01e08 of "Mad About You", Jamie finds out Paul still has an apartment in his name that he's subletting. Jamie wants Paul to get his name off the lease and when he goes there, we find out the person subletting The Apartment is Kramer. Paul even asks Kramer if his neighbor, Jerry, is still doing comedy. It even seems to be The Apartment hallway from the Seinfeld set. However, in s07e01 of "Seinfeld" George Costanza says he hates the show "Mad About You" as he and Susan are watching it, which many consider means a Seinfeld/Mad About You crossover never actually happened (since it would have to mean a show called "Mad About You" exists in the "Mad About You" universe). But there wasn't a Seinfeld episode where a "Mad About You" character appears as a crossover. Later, in s07e01 of "Mad About You", Jerry Seinfeld has a cameo where he bumps into Paul and a Paul tells him his wife is a huge fan and wants an autograph, and he's referenced as a celebrity. This episode aired about 4 months after the "Seinfeld" finale, where Jerry and friends get sentenced to a year in prison, so it's unlikely it's another crossover episode and Jerry is just playing himself.

Answer: It was sort of an urban legend that started when people noticed Jerry has a Superman figurine on his bookshelf. Barry Freiman, a writer who has written about Superman and pop culture, says he watched every Seinfeld episode looking for a reference in each one and said even though there's a lot, it not in every episode. When Jerry Seinfeld was asked about it, he said you can't count seeing the Superman model as a reference to Superman and there's maybe 10 episodes that actually reference Superman.

Bishop73

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Question: I know the pilot was shot and shown in 1989, but were there any other episodes shot and or shown along with the pilot?

Answer: No, The Seinfeld Chronicles (the first episode) was filmed and broadcast by itself, and eventually the series was picked up by NBC. Only then was the next episode - "Male Unbonding" - filmed. The next episode to air after the pilot was "The Stakeout", almost a year after the pilot was broadcast.

Answer: Not specifically. There is an earlier episode where they hint that they broke up so that they could remain friends because they were better as friends than as people romantically involved.

Zwn Annwn

Answer: Seinfeld has claimed that he wanted to "go out on top". He was done with TV and wanted to venture back into stand-up comedy.

Ral0618

More mistakes in Seinfeld

The Voice - S9-E2

Kramer: They're redoing the Cloud Club.
Jerry: Oh, that restaurant on top of the Chrysler Building? Yeah, that's a good idea.
Kramer: Of course it is. It's my idea.
Jerry: Which part? The renovating the restaurant you don't own part, or the spending the two hundred million you don't have part?

More quotes from Seinfeld

Trivia: No matter who the characters in Seinfeld call, they never have to look up the phone number in the phone book. They have the phone numbers to every restaurant, hotel, and business memorised.

More trivia for Seinfeld

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