Who Framed Roger Rabbit

Question: I read that Doom hates Toons and that's why he wants to destroy ToonTown, but why would he hate Toons if he's one himself? Is this like Blade that hates vampires when he's one himself?

Chosen answer: There's really a lot of possible reasons he hates other toons. There's a whole Roger Rabbit book and comic book series that explain Doom's background more. In the film, he's greedy and wants to destroy Toon Town to build the freeway to make more money. In human disguise he's also seen as merciless and is just punishing toons to maintain law and order, etc. Although that's just an excuse to kill toons as well. However, not explained in the film; as a toon he was cast as the antagonist in cartoon films until an accident one day left him thinking he was an actual villain (as opposed to just an actor playing one). That's when he began his life of crime, including killing Teddy Valiant. So his hatred of toons is more about him being evil and not a personal vendetta against them, like Blade's motives.

Question: Does "pattycake" also mean something sexual? We were obviously at first supposed to think Jessica and Acme had sex, but if they were, why would she say "pattycake" and why does Maroon say "You're not the first guy whose wife went pattycake on him"? Am I missing out on something?

raph

Chosen answer: According to the director, Pattycake is the toon equivalent to sex.

Greg Dwyer

Question: Why exactly did R.K. Maroon want to sell his studio? A scene in the movie shows a news reel of him shaking hands with a Cloverleaf corporate man. A full explanation would be appreciated.

Chosen answer: Maroon was simply greedy and Cloverleaf offered him a lot of money to sell, provided Acme sold his part too. Spoiler alert: Maroon was only trying to frame Acme (with the Jessica Rabbit patty-cake pictures), not kill him. However, Judge Doom turned out to be the owner of Cloverleaf and by buying out Maroon and Acme, he could get rid of Toontown (he hated toons). So Doom was willing to pay Maroon a lot of money (and when that didn't work, turned to murder).

Bishop73

Question: When Eddie is fighting Doom at the end he spots a box with a singing sword in it. He whips it out and sure enough, the sword starts singing. My question is, why would there even be a singing sword? Is this a reference to something else?

Carl Missouri

Chosen answer: One of the legends of Excalibur says that the sword sang when Arthur pulled it from the stone. Bugs Bunny went on a quest for the singing sword in a cartoon once, so there's historical AND cartoon precedence for singing swords.

Captain Defenestrator

Question: in the very end when judge doom is "dipped", the other toons ask who he was, does anyone out in movie land know who he was supposed to be?

Chosen answer: I don't think he was supposed to be any established cartoon character; they just wanted to know who the pile of goo on the floor used to be.

Xofer

Question: When Eddie is going up to what he believes is Jessica's apartment, how was he able to survive being flattened on the elevator floor and then slammed on the roof of the elevator while all it took to kill his brother was a piano? Eddie even mentions that Teddy died in ToonTown.

Chosen answer: It's because he's now in the unreal cartoon world where characters suffer the most horrendous mishaps and injuries without being physically harmed.

raywest

Answer: Because the killer's intention was to murder Teddy all along, and saw to it that the piano would be lethal to him.

Question: The laws of physics in ToonTown are completely different from the laws of physics in the real world, so when Eddie is recounting his brother's death to Roger, how could the piano have killed him?

Chosen answer: The laws of physics are different for 'toons wherever they are, not different for any and all beings within ToonTown. Eddie's brother was not a 'toon, so the piano killed him like it would any flesh-and-blood man.

Phixius

Question: Does anyone know what Jessica's maiden name was before she married Roger? Does she even have one?

Chosen answer: An earlier version of the script (which may or may not be canon) gave her maiden name as "Krupnick".

Question: I just watched this movie recently but this question had never come to my mind until that time; was there a reason why Doom killed Eddie's brother or was it accidental?

Chosen answer: It was intentional and was done to cover up his crimes. Doom was responsible for robbing the bank and killed Teddy (who was a cop) so he wouldn't get arrested. In the back-story of Doom (found outside of the film), Doom becomes a villain and starts a life of crime, and killing is just part of being an evil villain.

Question: When Doom was killed, why was a rubber mask and his outfit left behind? Shouldn't all of him had been killed or was he wearing a protective outfit? I'm asking because when the shoe was killed, nothing was left behind.

Chosen answer: Judge Doom wore the rubber mask and clothing to pose as a human; since they were not part of his toon body, they were left behind when he was destroyed by the dip. The shoe (as well as one of the weasels) was not posing as anything other than a toon, so it was completely destroyed by the dip.

zendaddy621

Question: Were they able to get ANY character from Hannah-Barbara? I am fully aware of the "discovery" logic of toons existing in that world before their official "premiere", so it seems possible. Was there a licensing difficulty?

dizzyd

Chosen answer: Likely, after all the negotiation in getting Disney and Warner Brothers toons into the same film (characters from both studios were required to have the same amount of screen time and the same number of lines, etc.) the producers decided not to push their luck and try to incorporate Hanna-Barbera as well. Also, Hanna-Barbera won't exist for 20 years until after the time of the film. Yogi Bear is a cub right now, and Fred Flintstone is washing dishes in a Hollywood Diner, so maybe we just didn't see them.

Captain Defenestrator

Question: In the bar how does Judge Doom know Roger is there by sniffing the record?

Chosen answer: The record is the song, "Merry Go-Round Broke Down, " known to most of us as the "Looney Toons" theme. That was Judge Doom's first clue that Roger could be around. We don't see who started the record playing, but it was probably the eponymous rabbit, himself. If so, he would have left his scent on the record, which the supremely evil Judge Doom could have picked up by sniffing the vinyl.

Michael Albert

Question: In the scene where Jessica Rabbit performs, when she's interacting with different objects in the room, such as the cloth napkin on Mr. Acme's table (to polish his bald head) and Eddie Valliant's tie and coat, how did they accomplish that if Jessica was drawn on the film later (so I've been led to believe is the process with cartoon/reality movies). Did they actually have a stand-in/actress that they drew over?

Chosen answer: According to the Disney Wiki (http://disney.wikia.com/wiki/Who_Framed_Roger_Rabbit) : "During production, one of the biggest challenges faced by the makers of the film was how to get the cartoon characters to realistically interact with real on-set props. This was ultimately accomplished in two different ways. Certain props (such as Baby Herman's cigar or the plates Roger smashes over his head) were moved on-set via motion control machines hooked up to operator who would move the objects in exactly the desired manner. Then, in post, the character was simply drawn 'over' the machine. The other way of doing it was by using puppeteers. This is most seen in the scene in the Ink & Paint club. The glasses held by the octopus bartender were in fact being controlled by puppeteers from above, whilst the trays carried by the penguin waiters were on sticks being controlled from below - both the wires and the sticks were simply removed in post and the cartoons added in." While Jessica's performance model is credited as Betsy Brantley, it appears she was the basis for the animation, rather than actually being present on-set.

Michael Albert

Question: After the weasels who work for Judge Doom leave Eddie's office having failed to find Roger, Roger remarks that Eddie saved his life. It is mentioned in the movie that The Dip is supposedly the only way to kill a Toon, so how would Roger have been killed if the weasels did find him, especially since they were holding guns?

Chosen answer: As you mention, the weasels work for Judge Doom, who is in possession of the dipping machine. Had they found Roger, they would have simply delivered him to Doom, who could then put Roger into the Dip.

Cubs Fan

Question: I never understood the "shave and a haircut" trick that Doom uses to lure out Roger. Why does Roger burst through the wall and yell "Two bits!" just to get caught? I never got it and its never explained.

Carl Missouri

Chosen answer: The musical notes that accompany the lines are a staple in nearly every cartoon ever drawn. Hence Doom's insistance that "no toon can resist" it. It drives Roger nuts that Doom isn't finishing the ditty.

Phixius

Question: Why is Betty Boop a black & white "Toon"? She makes the remark to Eddie that things have been tough since everything went to colour, but it was the development of coloured film that was different. Wouldn't "Toons" always have been coloured, but only filmed with the black & white film of the day? So shouldn't Betty Boop have also been a coloured "Toon", just like Mickey Mouse, who was also a black & white cartoon when he first appeared on film in "Steamboat Willy" in 1928, but is seen as a coloured "Toon" at the end of the film. Also if black & white "Toons" can become colourized, then why didn't Betty have this process done?

Chosen answer: Toons are made of ink. There would have been no reason for them to be made of colored ink before there were colored films. The black and white and colored characters would have been played by different toons. Steamboat Willy doesn't look much like modern Mickey Mouse so it must be a different "actor" playing the role. Modern soap operas do this all the time - a brunette character goes away for a while and comes back as a blonde a foot taller.

Myridon

Question: This movie wouldn't be anything special at all in these days; now they put everything into the computers and voilĂ . So, could anybody tell me (with direct examples) how did they make the interaction between Toons and humans without any CGI?

Chosen answer: They used a lot of practical trickery. In the bar scene where Roger is smashing plates on his head, they had a robot arm with a suction cup that would grab a plate and smash it on a metal rod where the head would be. The Weasels' guns were suspended by wires (watch the guns as they carry them. The movement is more characteristic of being hung than held). They had a robot arm that they could place a drink in to make it look like Roger was drinking a shot of whisky. This was used in Maroon's office (while Roger is sitting on the chair), and in the bar (when Eddy pulls the whole "You don't"/"I do" trick). Watch the scene where Roger takes the drink in the bar. Right after taking the drink and before the cut, his arm very conspicuously stays in a somewhat unusually rigid angle. They had to keep the arm there to cover up the robotic arm. They also had a little buggy for Bob Hoskins to ride around in when he was in Benny. The wheel that Hoskins holds was useless on the buggy and the vehicle was controlled by someone else.

Garlonuss

Question: In one movie trailer way back when the movie first came out there was a cut scene in which Eddie turns into cartoon pig. Is there any DVD that includes this scene?

iceverything776

Chosen answer: Yes, on the most recent DVD, it shows a sequence when Eddie is in Toontown and he begins turning into a pig. It also shows how the sequence was made. I think it shows it on Disc 2.

T Poston

Question: In the scene with Donald Duck and Daffy Duck on the piano, it seems as if Donald calls Daffy a racial slur. I was just wondering if anybody knows what he says and if it's true?

Chosen answer: He allegedly says "Go***mn stupid ni**er!' but the closed captioning claims that Donald calls Daffy a "Goddurn stubborn nitwit." But what he actually says is almost certainly the same thing he shouts in nearly every Donald Duck cartoon: some variant of "Why you doggone little..." Go to http://www.snopes.com/disney/films/donald.htm for more info.

rabid anarchist

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Quotes

Roger Rabbit: No! Not my Jessica! Not pattycake! It can't be! It just can't be! Jessica's my wife! It's absolutely impossible! Jessica's the love of my life. The apple of my eye. The cream in my coffee.
Eddie Valiant: Well you better start drinking it black, Acme's taking the cream now.

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Mistakes

When Jessica appears on stage, Eddie has Betty Boop standing next to him in all close-up shots, except for a wide shot of the public behind Jessica where Boop is missing.

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Trivia

In the Ink and Paint Club, when Jessica is about to do her number, just as the curtains open, her dress snaps off for a split second, then reappears. This can only be seen in slow motion on the laserdisc version, however.

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