Who Framed Roger Rabbit

Question: In the scene where Jessica Rabbit performs, when she's interacting with different objects in the room, such as the cloth napkin on Mr. Acme's table (to polish his bald head) and Eddie Valliant's tie and coat, how did they accomplish that if Jessica was drawn on the film later (so I've been led to believe is the process with cartoon/reality movies). Did they actually have a stand-in/actress that they drew over?

Answer: According to the Disney Wiki (http://disney.wikia.com/wiki/Who_Framed_Roger_Rabbit) : "During production, one of the biggest challenges faced by the makers of the film was how to get the cartoon characters to realistically interact with real on-set props. This was ultimately accomplished in two different ways. Certain props (such as Baby Herman's cigar or the plates Roger smashes over his head) were moved on-set via motion control machines hooked up to operator who would move the objects in exactly the desired manner. Then, in post, the character was simply drawn 'over' the machine. The other way of doing it was by using puppeteers. This is most seen in the scene in the Ink & Paint club. The glasses held by the octopus bartender were in fact being controlled by puppeteers from above, whilst the trays carried by the penguin waiters were on sticks being controlled from below - both the wires and the sticks were simply removed in post and the cartoons added in." While Jessica's performance model is credited as Betsy Brantley, it appears she was the basis for the animation, rather than actually being present on-set.

Michael Albert

Question: After the weasels who work for Judge Doom leave Eddie's office having failed to find Roger, Roger remarks that Eddie saved his life. It is mentioned in the movie that The Dip is supposedly the only way to kill a Toon, so how would Roger have been killed if the weasels did find him, especially since they were holding guns?

Answer: As you mention, the weasels work for Judge Doom, who is in possession of the dipping machine. Had they found Roger, they would have simply delivered him to Doom, who could then put Roger into the Dip.

Cubs Fan

Question: Why is Betty Boop a black & white "Toon"? She makes the remark to Eddie that things have been tough since everything went to colour, but it was the development of coloured film that was different. Wouldn't "Toons" always have been coloured, but only filmed with the black & white film of the day? So shouldn't Betty Boop have also been a coloured "Toon", just like Mickey Mouse, who was also a black & white cartoon when he first appeared on film in "Steamboat Willy" in 1928, but is seen as a coloured "Toon" at the end of the film. Also if black & white "Toons" can become colourized, then why didn't Betty have this process done?

Answer: Toons are made of ink. There would have been no reason for them to be made of colored ink before there were colored films. The black and white and colored characters would have been played by different toons. Steamboat Willy doesn't look much like modern Mickey Mouse so it must be a different "actor" playing the role. Modern soap operas do this all the time - a brunette character goes away for a while and comes back as a blonde a foot taller.

Myridon

Question: This movie wouldn't be anything special at all in these days; now they put everything into the computers and voilĂ . So, could anybody tell me (with direct examples) how did they make the interaction between Toons and humans without any CGI?

Answer: They used a lot of practical trickery. In the bar scene where Roger is smashing plates on his head, they had a robot arm with a suction cup that would grab a plate and smash it on a metal rod where the head would be. The Weasels' guns were suspended by wires (watch the guns as they carry them. The movement is more characteristic of being hung than held). They had a robot arm that they could place a drink in to make it look like Roger was drinking a shot of whisky. This was used in Maroon's office (while Roger is sitting on the chair), and in the bar (when Eddy pulls the whole "You don't"/"I do" trick). Watch the scene where Roger takes the drink in the bar. Right after taking the drink and before the cut, his arm very conspicuously stays in a somewhat unusually rigid angle. They had to keep the arm there to cover up the robotic arm. They also had a little buggy for Bob Hoskins to ride around in when he was in Benny. The wheel that Hoskins holds was useless on the buggy and the vehicle was controlled by someone else.

Garlonuss Premium member

Answer: There was also a giant sized doll of Roger Rabbit, Bob Hoskins would use it as a reference point or as stunt doll when he had to grab Roger. Charles Fleischer, the voice of Roger Rabbit, would stand off camera in costume saying his lines.

Answer: During Prohibition, which lasted throughout the 20's and early 30's, alcoholic beverages were effectively entirely banned in the US. Illicit, illegal places (often referred to as a "speakeasy" or "rotgut room") were created where people could drink alcohol on the down low. They were often secret establishments or hidden areas within another business. The secret room in the bar is one such room. The reason there are peepholes in the room is so they could keep an eye out for unwanted company (aka, the police or other authorities) while people illegally drank. If they saw the police coming, they could hide the booze and try to find a way to sneak out.

TedStixon

Question: Who is the character with him in the picture?

Answer: This question needs way more context. Who is the he you're referring to and what picture are you referring to?

Bishop73

If you're referring to the pictures that Eddie is looking at, the guy in the pictures next to Eddie is his brother Teddy who was killed by Judge Doom.

Question: When Eddie is around the human characters, there are quite a few of them who make fun of his brother's death. Even some of the cops think it's funny too. The only one that seems sympathetic and to be concerned about is his girlfriend. Why do they think it's funny that a human died from a falling piano?

Answer: When did a human, let alone a cop, make fun of his brother's death? They made fun of Eddie for becoming a drunk, but not for losing his brother.

Brian Katcher

Who Framed Roger Rabbit mistake picture

Continuity mistake: When Jessica appears on stage, Eddie has Betty Boop standing next to him in all close-up shots, except for a wide shot of the public behind Jessica where Boop is missing. (00:18:15 - 00:19:05)

Sacha Premium member

More mistakes in Who Framed Roger Rabbit

Roger Rabbit: No! Not my Jessica! Not pattycake! It can't be! It just can't be! Jessica's my wife! It's absolutely impossible! Jessica's the love of my life. The apple of my eye. The cream in my coffee.
Eddie Valiant: Well you better start drinking it black, Acme's taking the cream now.

More quotes from Who Framed Roger Rabbit
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Trivia: When the filmmakers sought permission to use the Looney Tunes characters in the film, Warner Brothers only agreed on the condition that Bugs Bunny receive equal screen time with Mickey Mouse.

More trivia for Who Framed Roger Rabbit

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