Star Trek

Show generally

Question: It's generally accepted that Warp Drive makes a bubble of space around the vessel and accelerates the outer bubble around the space surrounding the ship. Given the nature of the warp drive enveloping a pocket of space, can the warp drive be used offensively to capture part of another vessel in the space surrounding the Enterprise and use the acceleration to tear the enemy ship apart?

Chosen answer: It's never been stated how far outside the ship the warp field can extend. Excessive use of warp technology can cause subspace rifts, which is why maximum speed in non-emergency situations is Warp 5. So, whether out of impracticability or potentially a criminal act, nobody uses warp fields offensively. Proton Torpedoes travel at warp, but they don't go past Warp 5 either.

Captain Defenestrator

Show generally

Question: Why don't any of the Treks to come use any of the useful things that Enterprise discovers? A psychotricorder can record your memories! Scalosian water speeds up humanoids to the point they can dodge energy beams! A veinful of kironide makes you a powerful telekinetic a few minutes after injection! If Picard, Sisko and Janeway had just read Kirk's logs, the Borg and Dominion wouldn't have had a chance.

Grumpy Scot

Chosen answer: They do use much of the technology, just not the particular items you mention. There are many reasons: perhaps the technology was deemed too dangerous and outlawed (as with the planet Talos), or found impossible to reproduce. The Prime Directive would prohibit them from stealing the technology too, no matter how valuable.

Jason Hoffman

Show generally

Question: What was the fate of all five series' captains?

Chosen answer: According to on-screen text visible in one episode, Jonathan Archer served as Chief of Staff at Starfleet Command, then was appointed Federation ambassador to Andoria. He then served on the Federation Council, before finally holding the office of Federation President for eight years. According to additional biographical text that ultimately never appeared on-screen (and therefore may not be canon), Archer died peacefully at home in 2245, the day after attending the launch ceremony of the Enterprise NCC-1701. James T. Kirk died on Veridian III in 2371, 78 years after he was believed killed on the Enterprise-B, as seen in Star Trek: Generations (although novels written by William Shatner have resurrected the character for further adventures, these are of uncertain canonicity at best). Jean-Luc Picard remains in command of the Enterprise-E; while a future version has been seen as an ex-Federation Ambassador suffering from the lethal irumodic syndrome, this remains only a possible future. Benjamin Sisko was taken into the Celestial Temple by the Bajoran Prophets; a series of follow-up books reveals that he eventually returns and lives on Bajor with his family, but, as with Kirk, the canonicity of these novels remains unclear. Kathryn Janeway was promoted to Vice Admiral upon Voyager's return from the Delta Quadrant and, when last seen, held a position at Starfleet Command.

Tailkinker

Show generally

Question: How in the world did Hikaru Sulu, whom under all circumstances is Japanese, end up with that last name? Even in the novelization of the Star Trek IV, he meets his great (great.) grandfather named Akira Sulu. (Question is aimed more for a production explanation than a story-based one.)

Chosen answer: Production explanation: Gene Roddenberry took the name Hikaru from the legendary Japanese novel "Tale of Genji" and Sulu from the Sulu Sea, located in Southeast Asia. Roddenberry wanted a universal-Asian name and said, "[Since] the waters of a sea touch all shores," the name Sulu was perfect. Story-based explanation: presumably somewhere in Sulu's family line there was a non-Japanese (probably Filipino) male whose surname was passed on.

Sierra1

Show generally

Question: Does anyone have an idea how the Klingons - quite human-looking in the original series - have got their forehead furrows for which they are now famous (and easily recognizable)? I've heard rumors so far that the whole issue would be explained in the current 'Enterprise' series, but so far I haven't caught the clue.

Chosen answer: It was discussed in "Enterprise". The Klingons try to make augments (super-klingons), but to do so they used the human augments DNA. This caused the Klingons whom were tested to look partly human (hence the lack of forehead ridges). It then turned into a virus which spread to many of the Klingon population. Causing them to look 'human-like'.

Craig Bryant

Share

Follow

Add something

Share

Follow

Most popular pages

Best movie mistakesBest mistake picturesBest comedy movie quotesMovies with the most mistakesNew this monthThe Wizard of Oz mistakesTitanic mistake pictureThe Simpsons mistakesThe Village endingThe Book of Life questionsThe Parent Trap triviaHow the Grinch Stole Christmas quotesAvatar plotHarrison Ford movies & TV showsThe 20 biggest Friends mistake picturesPirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl mistake video

Quotes

Spock: Live long and prosper.

More...

Mistakes

Trelane says he studied Earth images that travelled to him at light speed, and earlier they establish Gothos is 900 years from Earth. But Trelane references Napoleon and Hamilton, who weren't around until 1800 or so. That would put this episode in 2700, but the original Trek episodes are set in the 2200's.

More...

Trivia

Gene Roddenberry created the transporter as an easier (and cheaper) way of getting Enterprise crew members onto a planet's surface, rather than landing the ship on the planet.

More...

Follow