Star Trek: Voyager
Star Trek: Voyager mistake picture

Good Shepherd - S6-E20

Revealing mistake: Right at 40:30, if you look in the top left corner of the LCD screen, you can see a mouse cursor. Six seconds later it starts to move around. It seems like someone noticed and tried to move it out of the scene. (00:40:30)

isaf00

Blink of an Eye - S6-E12

Plot hole: When orbiting the planet, Seven says that for every second on Voyager, nearly a day passes on the planet and later Janeway says 3 seconds is nearly 2 days. However, throughout the episode, time seems to move much faster on the planet to fit the plot. It would take more than 6 days for 1,000 years to pass. And in a few hours (3) less than 20 years would pass (hardly enough time for the rise and fall of a civilization). For example, when they receive the transmission, they slow it down and immediately start playing it. The next scene the senior officers are listening to it and the Doctor says nearly a century has passed, but there's no reason (or indication) that they waited almost 15 hours to listen to it.

Bishop73

Alice - S6-E5

Continuity mistake: When Tom explains to Alice why he can't leave the Voyager, he has a three-day beard. Later in the ship, when Alice convinces him to turn on the neurological interface, he is cleanly shaved. But in the next scene he has his beard back again.

Spirit Folk - S6-E17

Plot hole: Gunfire damages the holodeck controls, and the computer announces that safety protocols are now offline. This implies that they were online before the gunfire. If they were still online before the gunfire, the bullets would not have damaged the controls.

Birdzip

Upvote valid corrections to help move entries into the corrections section.

Suggested correction: Safety protocols are meant to protect the real people in the simulation, holobullets would still cause damage to non-real people and objects.

Bishop73

Blink of an Eye - S6-E12

Factual error: Chakotay says "if our orbit starts to decay, Voyager will begin to feel the effects of the differential, and we'll begin aging hundreds of times faster than we would in normal space". Whilst it is true that they would be aging faster relative to normal space, they would not instantly become old. Time would simply slow around them, so whilst they would be aging faster relative to normal space, they would not all of a sudden become really old - which is how it is made out to be. They would all age the same amount whether in a standard orbit or in a more decayed orbit. (00:06:37)

Upvote valid corrections to help move entries into the corrections section.

Suggested correction: There is nothing incorrect about what he said. They will start ageing hundreds of times faster than in normal space.

Aging implies getting/feeling older. They'd only be "aging" relative to normal space. What would happen would be more akin to time travel, with the universe getting older around them.

But the point is, they wouldn't age faster just because "normal" time slows down. If they spent a year on the planet, they'd age 1 year, not 100 years.

Bishop73

Life Line - S6-E24

Other mistake: When Janeway plays the message from the Admiral, she tells the computer to advance to time index 121.4. each 0.1 of the time index equals 1 second. We hear the message play for 4-5 seconds, but when the video is shown, the time index is only 121.5.

Bishop73

Fury - S6-E23

Continuity mistake: When future Kes is talking to Neelix in the kitchen, when he says he's already reserved the holodeck, he's holding the smaller container. In the next shot, the smaller container is on the counter and he's holding the bigger pot.

Bishop73

Ashes to Ashes - S6-E18

Character mistake: When the now human Borg children are sculpting, one of the children tell Seven he made a cube that's precisely 1/1,000 the size of a Borg vessel. Borg Cubes are described as 3 kilometers in length, if not bigger. 1/1,000 of that would be more than 9.8 feet in length. 1/10,000 the size would have been a more accurate description.

Bishop73

The Voyager Conspiracy - S6-E9

Factual error: When the alien contacts Voyager after his catapult jump, he states that he is 5,000 light years away. Despite the distance, he and Janeway have a real time conversation. With this incredible communications technology, Voyager (which is at this point less than 55,000 light years from the Alpha Quadrant) should be able to have several back and forth conversations a day with Starfleet.

Guy

Memorial - S6-E14

Character mistake: B'Elanna replicates and assembles a television from 1956, including a remote control. Tom however says they didn't have remote controls in the 50's. The first wireless remote was invented in 1955 and the "Zenith Space Command" (a remote looking similar to the one in use) came out in 1956, which fits the timeline. Tom is vastly aware of 1950's technology (he seems to know when the television remote came out) and wouldn't make that mistake or B'Elanna would have corrected him given how much research she had to do to set the whole thing up.

Bishop73

Live Fast and Prosper - S6-E21

Other mistake: As Captain Janeway enters engineering after her sonic shower incident you hear crew members calling out problems on the ship. One mentions something about Deck C and another mentions a problem on Deck 22. Letters are not used to designate decks and there are only 15 decks on Voyager. (00:06:30)

Chef Greg Swagler

11:59 - S5-E23

Shannon O'Donnel: 5:00am, December 27th, 2000. I'm in the great state of...Indiana, I think. I saw the world's largest ball of string this morning and the world's largest beefsteak tomato this afternoon. It was the size of a Volkswagen. The string, not the tomato.

Bishop73

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Investigations - S2-E20

Trivia: King Abdullah of Jordan appears in this episode (he was Crown Prince at the time), as a Voyager crewmember in a corridor scene. He is uncredited.

More trivia for Star Trek: Voyager

Chosen answer: Before Q sent the Enterprise to the delta quadrant to officially contact the Borg, there were already indications that the Borg was beginning to reach Federation territory. There were remarks towards the end of the first season of the Next Generation that several of the furthest Federation outposts were being attacked by some unknown enemy. They suspected the Romulans, but when contact with the Romulans was re-established, they learned that it was not them. The Hansens had simply figured things out much earlier than anyone else in the Federation. They learned about the Borg nine years earlier, but Starfleet mainly took notice when their outposts started getting wiped out. It is logical to assume that there were indications of Borg scouting parties and research efforts well before that.

Garlonuss Premium member

Answer: Add to that the two transport ships at the start of Star Trek Generations were carrying El-Aurian refugees to Earth. It wasn't stated in the film what they were refugees of, but Guinan would state in TNG that the Borg wiped out her planet and most of people, so it's a safe bet that's what it was. And with 47 El-Aurians being rescued by the Enterprise-B, there were plenty of people to tell Starfleet about this cybernetic threat. At the time though, Starfleet did not have the ability or resources to investigate this further, and it was eventually forgotten when other things became important until the Enterprise-D encountered that cube at J-25.

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