Blazing Saddles

Other mistake: As Charlie and Bart are starting to get up from the quick sand, the light reflector is jostled, thereby causing the light to jump.

Movie Nut

Other mistake: When the Western fight breaks into the dance movie set, the background of the Western movie is seen, even though it was all several hundred feet away, on an outdoor set.

Movie Nut

Upvote valid corrections to help move entries into the corrections section.

Suggested correction: This is entirely in keeping with the "reveal of the movie within a movie.

Of that, there's no question. I was pointing out that the sets for both movies were a distance apart...the Western backdrop should not have been seen.

Movie Nut

Other mistake: When the gang rides into Rock Ridge, a cigar smoking man, standing in front of a door, takes a bullet through his hat, front to rear. There is no mark on the door behind him.

stevewaclo

Visible crew/equipment: When Bart enters the saloon to deliver the candygram to Mongo, his shadow can clearly be seen against the painted backdrop behind him depicting the street scene. (00:47:45)

More mistakes in Blazing Saddles

Bart: Well, can't you see that's the last act of a desperate man?
Howard Johnson: We don't care if it's the first act of "Henry V, " we're leaving!

More quotes from Blazing Saddles

Trivia: The late Richard Pryor, who helped write the screenplay, was originally supposed to play Bart. However, his controversial stand-up comedy routines made it difficult to secure financing. Cleavon Little was eventually cast in Pryor's place.

Cubs Fan

More trivia for Blazing Saddles

Question: At the beginning, Lyle refers to the song Camptown races as "The Camptown lady"? Is this simply cause he's stupid, or is there any other reason?

Gavin Jackson

Chosen answer: The opening line of the song refers to the Camptown Ladies and the phrase "Camptown Races" never appears anywhere in the lyrics. If nobody told him otherwise, Lyle may simply have assumed that some variation on "Camptown Ladies" was the actual title.

Tailkinker

The actual title of the song was "Gwine to Run All Night, or De Camptown Races," written by American lyricist Stephen Foster and first published in 1850. Over many years on the minstrel show circuit, the title was shortened to "Camptown Races" and was sometimes erroneously called "Camptown Ladies." While the phrase "Camptown Races" doesn't appear in the lyrics, the phrase "Camptown Racetrack" does appear in the second line: "Camptown ladies sing dis song, doo-dah, doo-dah, Camptown Racetrack five miles long, oh-de-doo-dah-day." The song refers to Camptown, Pennsylvania, a real town with a popular horserace in the mid-1800s.

Charles Austin Miller

More questions & answers from Blazing Saddles

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