Star Trek: The Next Generation

The Measure of a Man - S2-E9

Trivia: When Riker views Data's file on his computer, Data is listed as "NFN NMI Data." This stands for "no first name" and "no middle initial."

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The Royale - S2-E12

Trivia: In this episode, Picard is studying Fermat's Great Theorem, and says it has remained unsolved for 800 years. Five years after the episode was made the theorem was proven, by Andrew Wiles and Richard Taylor from Princeton University (their proof is not the same as Fermat's though, as they used modern methods Fermat did not know of). In the Star Trek universe, this was referred to in an episode of Deep Space Nine, and is considered as a subtle correction for Picard's statements.

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Twotall

Loud as a Whisper - S2-E5

Trivia: Closed captioning, in its infancy in the 80s, often dropped words and letters by accident. In the original broadcast of this episode, the captioning of Riva's line, "We could dine together," lost an N, resulting in a rather bizarre exchange. Riva: We could die together. Troi: I'd like that.

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Jean G

Manhunt - S2-E19

Trivia: Mick Fleetwood, the drummer of Fleetwood Mac, has a cameo as one of the Antedean dignitaries.

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Cubs Fan

Loud as a Whisper - S2-E5

Trivia: Guest star Marnie Mosiman, who plays a member of Riva's chorus, is married to John de Lancie, who had a recurring role as the omnipotent mischief-maker Q.

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Cubs Fan

The Measure of a Man - S2-E9

Trivia: As Picard argues for Data, the wall behind Maddox can easily be seen as the forward wall and viewer of the Enterprise Battle Bridge, re-purposed for this episode.

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Movie Nut

The Icarus Factor - S2-E14

Trivia: John Tesh, the host of Entertainment Tonight at the time, makes a cameo as one of the Klingons in Worf's Ascension ceremony.

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Cubs Fan

The Royale - S2-E12

Trivia: When Captain Picard is reading Hotel Royale in his ready room, he comments that the book's first line, 'it was a dark and stormy night', is "not a promising beginning". This line is actually the first line of Edward Bulwer-Lytton's Paul Clifford; the line has become so clich├ęd that it frequently appears in satirical works to denote humorously incompetent or overly melodramatic writing.

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Cubs Fan

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