TonyPH

23rd Jan 2022

Scream 3 (2000)

Trivia: The plot of Scream 3, which involves the predatory sexual history of the producer of the film-within-the-film "Stab 3," would unfortunately prove even more prescient years later as the predatory sexual history of studio head Harvey Weinstein was made public. His victims included Rose McGowan, who appeared in the first Scream. The Weinstein Company produced the first four Scream films, and after it was shut down the Scream series was bought by Spyglass Entertainment and Paramount.

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Continuity mistake: Valeris seems to appear out of nowhere during the thwarted assassination attempt on Khitomer. The Enterprise crew beam down without her, spring into action, and when Admiral Cartwright yells "Arrest those men!" Spock emerges from the crowd with Valeris in his custody as if she were always there with him or he'd pulled her out of a hat.

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Trivia: Early storyline development used essentially the setup for the Star Wars films only the villain was on the side of the rebellion. David was a (villainous, initially) version of Luke and it was a plot twist that Kirk is his father. The Genesis device was a planet-destroying weapon a la the Death Star, Khan lurked in the shadows dressed in a cloak and used psychic powers like the Emperor, and Spock would have died in the middle and at the end speak from beyond the grave like Obi Wan Kenobi.

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Trivia: Before the final script, Kirk and Khan were planned to have an extremely elaborate fight scene featuring swords, whips, and fireballs. Producer Robert Sallin has said "We had some characters that had electricity coming out of their fingertips. I was very, very concerned."

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17th Jan 2022

Dracula (1979)

Deliberate mistake: Despite it being demonstrated multiple times earlier in the film that vampires do not have a reflection, a key moment features the undead Mina being revealed in a reflection in water. The filmmakers said they were aware of the discrepancy but ultimately decided the visual was striking enough to bend the rules for.

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Trivia: Going by the timeframes indicated in the film, the presidential candidate that Moran claims to have wiretapped and helped defeat would've been Richard Nixon.

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Continuity mistake: Gene Hackman returns a second cookie to Harrison Ford's dish that he hadn't taken - or perhaps it's the same cookie he picked up and returned a moment earlier. Either way, the cookie had suddenly appeared in Hackman's hands going from one shot to another. (00:30:35)

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Character mistake: Chekov pulls a gun on the Klingon ambassador even though he hasn't been implicated in the conspiracy.

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Deliberate mistake: It's not particularly believable that the away team to stop the assassination would consist of the ship's entire senior staff, and raises the question of who was left in charge of the bridge (the answer: apparently nobody, as they return to a completely deserted bridge). Of course this is dramatic license, and at this point the audience won't care or likely even notice.

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Deliberate mistake: In the pitch dark mansion dining room, the approaching zombie's screams are instantly interrupted by silence whenever the flame from Chris' lighter goes out, and then the screams instantly resume when the light returns. While this is obvious artistic license, for the record the level of darkness would have no bearing on whether we can hear the zombie screaming.

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26th Nov 2021

The Conversation (1974)

Trivia: The main character's name "Harry Caul" was the result of a typo; his name was meant to be "Harry Call," but Francis Ford Coppola ended up liking the mistaken name even better.

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26th Nov 2021

The Conversation (1974)

Trivia: The final repetition of the line "He'd kill us if he had the chance" had its inflection changed because preview audiences became preoccupied with questions over whether Harry had misinterpreted the couple's conversation or if they were deliberately being misleading (or both). The ambiguity was initially intended, but appeared to work a little too well and distracted the audience from appreciating the rest of the ending, so this delivery of the line was made more definitive.

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26th Nov 2021

The Conversation (1974)

Trivia: The dream sequence in which Harry tries to talk to Ann was originally meant to take place in real life (within the film, that is). The production didn't have time to finish the scene and the fog effects looked too phony. But rather than scrap the scene entirely, editor Walter Murch came up with the idea to include the footage as a dream.

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10th Nov 2021

Scream (1996)

10th Nov 2021

Scream (1996)

Trivia: The lines in which the characters compare Sidney to Meg Ryan and Tori Spelling are leftovers from when Drew Barrymore was slated to play Sidney, who was specifically described as blonde in the script. Of course, when Tori Spelling actually appeared in Scream 2, it wasn't anything a little hair dye couldn't fix.

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10th Nov 2021

Scream (1996)

Trivia: Sidney was specifically blonde in the script. When Drew Barrymore switched roles from Sidney to Casey, it caused an odd ripple effect on the cast's various hair colors. It was decided to cast a brunette (Neve Campbell) for Sidney to give her a distinct look from Casey. In turn, Rose McGowan decided to dye her hair blonde so that her character, Tatum, would look more distinct from Sidney.

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24th Sep 2021

Scream (1996)

Trivia: A scene near the end required Skeet Ulrich to throw a phone receiver in frustration, and he wound up accidentally hitting Matthew Lillard in the back of the head with it, prompting Lillard to yell at him, "You hit me with the phone, dick!" Wes Craven found this so hilarious that he decided to use that take in the film.

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Trivia: For many years, the UCLA library has held a tape for a black and white 1982 sci-fi film titled "Pisces Project." That is a code name: it is in fact an early rough cut version of 'Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan' featuring many deleted scenes that cannot be seen anywhere else. It's been sitting there since possibly the 1980s. It is available for public viewing via appointment, but the tape is prohibited from leaving the building.

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Trivia: For the opening credits, composer Leonard Rosenmann had recorded an orchestral rendition of Alexander Courage's theme music from the original TV show, but the final film opened with its own theme instead. The original series theme is only heard sparingly throughout the films and it wouldn't be until 'Star Trek' (2009) that it would be played in full (over the end credits in that case). Rosenmann's take on the Courage theme can be heard on the 'Star Trek IV' soundtrack.

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Trivia: Outside of the US, the title was modified to 'The Voyage Home: Star Trek IV' on promotional materials as well the film itself: the opening credits briefly faded into a completely new, custom-made animated title screen, in fact. The first PAL VHS releases in 1987 carried this title, but subsequent video releases reverted to 'Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home.'.

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