Vader47000

Character mistake: When recruiting Burt to help repel the Graboid attack in the arctic, one of the team members says he's ideal for the job because of his experience hunting them on two continents, a reference to the first two films (Nevada and Mexico in North America) and Tremors 5 (Africa). However, this repeats the mistake in Tremors 5 in overlooking the Argentina incursion stopped by Burt at the beginning of Tremors 3, which gives him experience fighting Graboids/Shriekers/Ass-Blasters on three continents, not two. Burt, himself having overlooked Argentina in Tremors 5, does not correct her. And it's not as if the film is completely ignoring Tremors 3, since it shows the flashback of Burt being swallowed by a Graboid in that movie, which is how he got infected with the deadly parasite killing him here.

Vader47000

Character mistake: In his opening prologue, Burt says the Graboids have been contained to the Northern Hemisphere, showing a map highlighting the Graboid attacks of the first film in Nevada and the second film in Mexico. However, it overlooks the Graboid/Shrieker attack in Argentina, in the Southern hemisphere, shown at the beginning of Tremors 3, an incursion Burt personally put down. It's not like it was classified - characters in that movie talk about it being reported by CNN, and characters in the Tremors TV series talk about it as well. And it's not like Tremors 3 is no longer canon, since Burt makes two references to being swallowed by the Graboid in that movie (which also becomes a plot point in Tremors 6).

Vader47000

16th Jan 2021

Men in Black III (2012)

Factual error: The ArcNet deploys after the Apollo 11 jettisons its launch escape system tower. This is the white tower at the top of the Saturn V stack attached to the white launch escape cone that covers the command module capsule that houses the crew. The idea is that if there is an emergency the LES will leave the crew capsule from the rest of the rocket and ferry it away so it can deploy parachutes and land during an abort. The tower connects to the cone through metal trellises. At some point during the launch when an LES abort is no longer an option, the ship will jettison the LES tower, which fires its rockets to pull the cone away from the capsule. As shown in MIB3, the tower with the ArcNet detaches at the trellises, leaving the white cone in place with no way to detach from the command module. The launch also shows spent debris falling over the middle of North America when it would be falling over the Atlantic Ocean. (01:32:30)

Vader47000

12th Jan 2021

Men in Black III (2012)

Continuity mistake: The shot of Apollo 11 flying away from Earth shows spent fuel stages and other debris falling away. When the ArcNet deploys after a flash of light, all the debris disappears. The shield should envelop the debris as it falls back to Earth, not make it vanish. (01:32:30)

Vader47000

Upvote valid corrections to help move entries into the corrections section.

Suggested correction: It is impossible to know how the fictional ArcNet will affect spent rocket stages.

Deliberate mistake: At the end of the film, when Alex, Maggie and Grig take off in the Gunstar, the crowd of trailer park residents watching them leave backs into the covered portion of the restaurant, right next to the 'Starfighter' game cabinet, which is readily visible in the shot. Mrs. Rogan then wonders where her younger son, Louis, is. The shot changes to show Louis pulling a bench up to the 'Starfighter' game to play it as dust from the Gunstar liftoff kicks up next to him while he watches it fly. Yet the crowd is nowhere to be seen in the shot of Louis playing the game despite everyone being huddled right next to it on the patio (his mother was standing next to it and should be able to see him). Given the proximity of the crowd to the game a moment earlier, Louis wouldn't be able to play it, let alone put a bench next to it. It's clear the filmmakers chose the image of the younger kid aspiring to be like his brother by playing the game over the logic of where the game was in relation to the crowd.

Vader47000

26th Oct 2020

The Naked Gun (1988)

Continuity mistake: While there is a "grand slam" depicted as one of the jokes, the inning-by-inning scoreboard never shows the Angels scoring 4 runs in an inning.

Vader47000

Character mistake: The Rufus hologram states that he first brought the phone booth to the Chosen Ones (Bill and Ted) in 1989, referencing events of the original film. While that was the year the first movie came out, it took place in 1988 (indicated by the opening title card and dialogue throughout the movie).

Vader47000

13th Oct 2020

The Naked Gun (1988)

Factual error: The first batter of the baseball game, Jay Johnstone, bats from the right-handed batter's box. Johnstone, a real player who is playing himself in the scene, was a lifetime left-handed batter.

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Upvote valid corrections to help move entries into the corrections section.

Suggested correction: Johnstone also played his last game in 1985, he never played for Seattle, and never wore "29." So, other than the name, there's nothing to indicate he's playing himself. He's not even credited as "himself."

Bishop73

Factual error: Roman Polanski and Sharon Tate are attending a party at the Playboy Mansion in 1969. In reality, Hugh Hefner didn't purchase the mansion until 1971, and didn't start living there until 1974, which is when the house's reputation for lavish parties started.

Vader47000

Continuity mistake: In the first film, John Adams Gates (Christopher Plummer) tells his grandson, young Ben, about how a boy named Thomas Gates learned about the Templar treasure from Charles Carroll in 1832. John refers to Thomas as "my grandfather's grandfather," making him Ben's Great-Great-Great-Great-Grandfather. The adult Thomas Gates is in the prologue of the sequel deciphering Booth's diary in 1865. His son, Charles, is said to be the grandfather of Patrick Gates, played by Jon Voight. That would make Thomas only Ben's great-great-grandfather, which another character refers to him as later in the second movie, which in turn makes Thomas Gates just the grandfather of John Gates. Either John Gates' memory is fuzzy in his old age or two generations of Gates men disappeared from the timeline. Perhaps John meant to say it was Ben's grandfather's grandfather, which is how Thomas is related to Ben in this movie.

Vader47000

15th May 2020

Armageddon (1998)

Other mistake: Adding on to the idea of the shuttles flying too close together, at a couple points the ejected shuttles from one booster appear to fly directly into the flight path of the tailing shuttle. While is certainly possible the second shuttle could maneuver to avoid the collision, it further demonstrates the absurdities of launching the two craft in such close proximity.

Vader47000

15th May 2020

Armageddon (1998)

Factual error: During the opening shot of the shuttle Atlantis in the satellite repair scenes, its cargo bay doors are closed. Standard procedure for orbiting shuttles was to keep its cargo doors open, for a variety of reasons, not the least of which is that the airlock is located within the cargo bay. The astronaut isn't tethered but using an MMU, but still would have to enter and exit through the cargo bay airlock, meaning if the doors where closed, if there were an emergency he'd have to wait for someone to open them before he could get back in.

Vader47000

Plot hole: Revelations in this film create a potential plot hole in Episode IV, in which Vader says Princess Leia is his only link to learning the location of the Rebel base. In this film, Vader captures the Profundity (Raddus' command ship), which is transporting the Tantive IV in its cargo hold. Vader then watches the Tantive IV fly away with the Death Star plans, leading into the beginning of A New Hope in which he captures that ship. So, the first question is, were there no survivors of the Profundity Vader could interrogate to learn of the location of the Rebel base (assuming the navicomputer has been scrubbed). Even if the entire crew were killed, in A New Hope we see several crewmembers of the Tantive IV have been captured. This film shows that the Tantive IV was at Yavin prior to the battle (evidenced by R2-D2 and C-3PO in the hangar). That then raises the question of why Vader couldn't have interrogated those other crewmembers to learn the location of Yavin as the Rebel base.

Vader47000

Factual error: The movie seems utterly ignorant of the 25th Amendment. According to the 25th Amendment, the VP and a majority of the cabinet can declare the president incapacitated if he is not in a position to do so himself, such as the coma Trumball was in. This is a textbook example of why that provision of the amendment was implemented. Yet the movie goes straight from the doctors saying Trumball was in a coma to showing the VP being sworn in as acting president (which is a dubious movie/TV trope on its own). Granted, maybe the implementation of the 25th amendment happened offscreen somehow. But later, an advisor says there's no precedent for a president to resume power from an acting VP. The 25th Amendment actually spells this out - the president submits a written declaration to Congress that he is fit to serve. And there is precedent for this, as both Reagan and Bush43 stepped down temporarily for medical procedures and resumed power shortly after.

Vader47000

16th Nov 2019

Cheers (1982)

Ill-Gotten Gaines - S11-E8

Character mistake: Cliff tests Norm's memory by asking him who the bad guy in 'Herbie The Love Bug' was (presumably meaning the first movie, which was just 'The Love Bug, ' no Herbie in the title, and not the TV series that actually had the 'Herbie, the Love Bug' title). Norm answers Keenan Wynn, and is told by Cliff that is correct and that his memory is OK. Wynn was the antagonist in the second movie, 'Herbie Rides Again' (reprising his role from the 'Absent-Minded Professor'). The bad guy in 'The Love Bug' was played by David Tomlinson of 'Mary Poppins' fame.

Vader47000

Continuity mistake: Iron Man, Cap, Ant-Man and Hulk are shown leaping into 2012 just as the original six Avengers formed their circle. Cap then immediately begins reminding the team of their assignments. The dialogue is continuous so there is no time compression involved. Within 10 seconds of their arrival, they watch 2012 Hulk jump into a nearby street and begins smashing Chitauri and jumping on a car. However, in the original film, after the Avengers form the circle, the events that follow include Loki ordering more troops, then Cap giving orders to the rest of the team to hold them off, ending with the order for Hulk to "smash." Hulk then jumps up and starts fighting Chitauri along the sides of buildings before being knocked down into the street, where he could have presumably landed where the 2023 team sees him (the original film cuts to Thor at this point). These events in the original film take at least a minute to unfold in real time. (01:07:35)

Vader47000

Continuity mistake: The first time period the film cuts to after the quantum jump is New York 2012, and shows the clip of the six original Avengers assembled for the first time, forming a circle, as seen in the 2012 film, It then cuts to new footage from this film - an overhead shot of the original team that then pans over to the alley where the future versions arrive. In the original footage, to Hulk's left and in front of Hawkeye are two overturned cars, then a couple of cabs in a row. However, in the overhead shot, in this spot there is just a bunch of rubble from the damaged streets, and a single car right-side up, and no cabs where they should be. Also, there should probably be pieces of a leviathan creature lying around too since Iron Man blew one up just before they formed up. In the original film the creature crashed and then fell over the side of the raised road onto the lower road. But nothing indicating this is visible in the overhead shot. (01:07:25)

Vader47000

16th Jul 2019

Stranger Things (2016)

Chapter One: Suzie, Do You Copy? - S3-E1

Factual error: When Dustin's toy collection "comes to life" (thanks to Eleven), one of the robots is the Transformer Ultra Magnus. Though it appears to be modified with a motorized engine that the actual toy didn't have, that's not the mistake, as there no reason Dustin couldn't have modified it. The error is that the season is set in July 1985, but Ultra Magnus wasn't released in the U.S. until 1986. (Yes, the toy was available as a Diaclone in Japan, but in a different color scheme. Dustin's has the coloring of the U.S. version, and even if he somehow ended up with the Diaclone version, it's highly unlikely he would have repainted a Japanese toy to resemble a Transformer he wouldn't know about the existence of yet, as the 'Transformers' animated movie wasn't released until August 1986).

Vader47000

28th May 2019

Veep (2012)

Inauguration - S5-E10

Factual error: The show depicts the vote ending in a 50-50 tie, and then shows VP Doyle casting a tie-breaking vote for Montez (which the show then erroneously treats as Montez being elected president - she would simply be the VP "acting as president" for as long as the House fails to resolve the stalemate). 67 senators have to cast votes for the meeting to count, and 51 votes are needed to be VP. A 50-50 tie in this case. The 12th amendment actually provides a procedural exception to the tie-breaking power, by stating that the majority of whole Senators, in this case, 51, are necessary for the selection of the VP. As the vice president is not a senator, his vote would not have an effect on reaching the necessary 51, and thus a 50-50 vote would simply trigger a new ballot, and the senate would continue to vote until someone is elected. In this regard, the show makes another mistake with an on-screen graphic identifying Doyle as a senator, and not the vice president, who while given the constitutional role of president of the senate is not actually a senator.

Vader47000

28th May 2019

Veep (2012)

Show generally

Plot hole: In season five, the show depicts the aftermath of an Electoral College tie. The procedure in this case should be the House holding subsequent ballots until a president is elected. On the show, however, Tom James convinces the Speaker of the House to hold one ballot, and then not vote again. James' plan is to win the Senate vote for VP, then act as president for four years before being elected to two full terms as actual president. James is outmaneuvered and his rival Montez is elected VP, and subsequently acts as president for the remainder of the series. After season 5, the show makes no mention of the House ever taking up a vote for president again, and the show simply treats Montez as the actual president. A Speaker of the House blocking the election of a new president would likely cause a political uprising from supports of both candidates, and both candidates would rightly take to the airwaves to demand a new vote. The idea of a power-hungry politician such as Selina, who uses every trick in the book to promote herself and elevate her own power, putting up no fight is just bizarre.

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