Journey to the Center of the Earth

Factual error: Trevor - a Professor of Geology - boasts about having an article published in Scientific American, and that is not something any scientist would do. Scientific American is looked upon with slight disdain by the scientific community, considered to be a populist crowd pleaser. It is not even peer reviewed. Considering that he has just turned the geological and archaeological worlds on their heads he would have been better off publishing in Journal of Geological Research or Geology, both prestigious professional journals.

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Continuity mistake: At the beginning where Trevor is looking through Max's stuff, he sets the glove on the table. In the next shot the glove is back in the box.

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Continuity mistake: After Trevor saves Hannah from underwater and they are all laying on the rocks, Hannah's wet stringy hair keeps on changing position and the wet hair that is stuck to her right shoulder keeps disappearing then reappearing back on her shoulder during the scene.

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Hamster

More mistakes in Journey to the Center of the Earth


Journey to the Center of the Earth mistake picture

Trivia: A subtle reference to this film's 3D format: In Max's box, Trevor finds a pocket stereoscope, which are funky looking glasses that create the illusion of a three-dimensional image from two-dimensional photographs. It was invented by Sir Charles Wheatstone in 1840.

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Super Grover

Trivia: There really are, believe it or not, such things as magnetic rocks.

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Paul M Leslie

Question: In some theaters, the film is shown in 3-D. When the film is released on home video, will it also be in 3-D?

Cubs Fan

Chosen answer: Yep. The DVD comes in 3-D and 2-D versions. The 3-D versions come with (if I remember correctly) four pairs of 3-D glasses.

Cubs Fan

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