Indiana Jones and The Last Crusade

Continuity mistake: When Indy and Kazim are about to jump off from the chopped boat, the boat swaps from sinking to floating between frames.

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Continuity mistake: Right before the castle is on fire, there is a chair very close to the fireplace. When the place starts to burn, father and son take shelter under the fireplace thanks to the fact that the chair has magically moved several meters away.

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Continuity mistake: When young Indy says, "Cort├ęs gave away the cross in 1920.", the thief is holding it with both hands. A frame later he holds it with just one hand.

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Continuity mistake: When Indy and Elsa come up through the manhole their hair is sopping wet and messy. As they run to the boat their hair is magically styled and not sopping wet anymore.

robsuttonjr

Revealing mistake: In the catacombs of the library, Indy and Elsa are waist deep in petroleum. Indy has a torch, and if you look carefully, you will see burning pieces of the torch fall and hit the petroleum. Wouldn't this start a fire as Kazim later on sets the cavern alight with a single match? (00:34:05)

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Trivia: Hitler was played by the actor Michael Sheard, this was the third time he had played Hitler for film and TV. Ironically, Sheard's wife was half-Jewish.

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Question: It seems that going after the grail diary in Berlin was just a plot point. Henry obviously knew about the trials in the cave by heart. The search for the holy grail has been a hobby of his for 40 years or so. Am I right?

Answer: Henry says, in response to Indy asking if he remembered the details of the trials: "I wrote them down in my diary so that I wouldn't have to remember." So, obviously he did NOT know them by heart. Also, as the other answer says, they didn't want the diary to either be in the Nazis' possession or be burned.

Answer: Neither Henry or Indiana would want the diary to remain in German hands. The Nazis wanted the Grail to exploit its power. As Elsa was a German scientist, she'd already gleaned enough knowledge from Henry and Indy to utilize the information contained within the diary. The diary also contained considerable data about the Grail and its history that Henry had researched over the years and would not have memorized and wanted to retain. He would also want to pass it on to Indy.

raywest Premium member

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