The Matrix Revolutions

Question: What is it that Captain Mifune shouts to the other people in the APUs after the digger has drilled through, just before the sentinels come through the hole? I've listened many times, but still can't work it out.

Chosen answer: Just as the sentinels begin coming thorough the hole he yells "For Zion!" as they begin firing.

Question: What exactly do the machines do on a day-to-day basis? What's their reason for existing? Is it solely to maintain and perfect the Matrix, develop more efficient programmes and hunt down the remaining humans? Are they planning universal domination? Or just designing more cute inquisitive little metal spiders with which to fill their cities?

diesel123

Chosen answer: The machines tried to peacefully found their own nation before the war that sent the last of the human race underground. So their society would not be entirely unlike our own. They perform tasks similar to a society based on agriculture would. They are not planning any sort of domination. They just wanted to be free and respected as mankind's equals. Humanity wouldn't have it, so they did what they had to do to survive.

Phixius

Question: Why does The Merovingian call Seraph 'Judas'?

Socks1000

Chosen answer: Seraph previously worked for the Merovingian, but left him to protect the Oracle, thus the Merovingian considers that Seraph has betrayed him.

Sierra1

Question: Which Smith does Neo fight at the end in the Super Brawl? I ask because at the end you see a shot of the Oracle lying unconscious in the middle of the street in the pouring rain, hinting maybe it was Oracle Smith Neo fought, to rub in the irony that the machine that was most behind the human's cause was the one to do them in. So which Smith was it? Original Smith, Oracle Smith, one of the other programs Neo encountered, or just a generic Smith?

Chosen answer: It's made clear that's it's Oracle Smith when he says "Everything that has a beginning has an end, Neo" in the pit. It's unclear which Smith assimilates the Oracle (they're technically all identical), but it seems likely there's only one "Oracled" Smith.

Nick N.

Question: Fairly techie question - during the attack on Zion a HUGE mass of sentinels breaks into the dock, and forms separate strands before making one huge stream and hitting the central control tower. This huge stream is being attacked from all angles and sentinels are dropping out as it moves. My question is, was this huge stream of squiddies created as one fairly generic blob to save time, or was it actually modelled as thousands of separate entities?

Jon Sandys

Chosen answer: If you look in the making of, the model appears to be one huge line where there are a few individual squids on the outside and in front.

Kirill Ostapenko

Question: It shows in Reloaded that the Architect's room has hundreds of TV's in which to "Watch over" the Matrix. Why didn't he notice Agent Smith "Multiplying" earlier on and put an end to it before it got so out of hand?

Chosen answer: Undoubtedly he tried. During the Burly Brawl, for example, an agent appears, but is turned into a Smith. It appears he has very little control over rogue programmes.

SexyIrishLeprechaun

Question: How did they film the Coat Room shoot-out scene?

Chosen answer: It was a real shot, with ropes and wires that held the actors upside down. There was a large amount of people in the back holding them upright, it's in the special feature.

Kirill Ostapenko

Question: Was Neo ever really The One? In the first film, Morpheus stated that the prophecy said The One would destroy the Matrix, and and all humans would be free; but Neo never destroyed the Matrix. So was he The One, and changed 'fate'; or was he not the true One, but just really powerful?

Chosen answer: Neo was the One. Prophecy is not always 100% correct on all the details. And he did destroy the illusion of the Matrix and granted freedom to those who desired it. So he did end up fulfilling the prophecy in a way. It's much like Anakin Skywalker bringing "balance to the force" by annhilating the Jedi and allowing a new order to spring forth. Not exactly what you would expect.

Grumpy Scot

Question: Many entries have made the assumption that the "Deus ex Machina" and "the source" are one and the same thing. I don't see that this is obvious. Does anyone have any observation or comments from the producers that proves that this is the case?

Chosen answer: Well Deus ex Machina does mean God from (or in) the Machine. Could be they are the same or that the Deus ex controls and uses the Source. Further it's likely that the Deus, Neo and the Source are an analogy to the Father, Son and Holy Ghost in Christian religion.

Grumpy Scot

Question: I had to watch Reloaded a few times to understand the plot. Correct me if I'm wrong, but the whole plot of Reloaded is that Zion is under threat and to find the key to that threat is to get the keymaker? My question is, what's the plot of Revolutions exactly?

Chosen answer: The war between the Machines and Zion has been stepped up due to Neo's refusal to take the Architect's offer that all previous Ones have accepted. Neo and Trinity take Niobi's ship to 01, the Machine City, to try to negotiate peace. Because Agent Smith is taking over the Matrix, the machines are willing to deal if Neo can destroy him.

Captain Defenestrator

Question: I understand how Neo has powers and can use these powers with his mind within the Matrix, but how does he have the power to stop the sentinels with his mind in the real world after they leave the ship? They are under attack and Neo just waves an out-stretched hand and they fall to the ground. How is this possible when not in the Matrix?

gk68

Chosen answer: The Oracle tells Neo that his powers extend beyond the Matrix and into the real world. By returning to the Matrix and the real world instead of returning to the Source, Neo is now connected to both, through a sort of organic wireless signal.

Greg Dwyer

Question: Of all the times Neo saved Trinity, why couldn't he do so at the end? And what happened to Neo at the end? He's just gone. I heard it explained but I still don't understand.

Chosen answer: Neo couldn't save Trinity that last time because he wasn't in the Matrix when she was injured, so his power was very limited. Neo's body did not disappear and the end, so I don't know what you mean by "gone". Within the Matrix he was taken over by Smith, a program that had gone rogue and disconnected itself from the machines' source. By jacking into the Matrix through the machines' source and allowing Smith to take over his avatar, Neo tricked Smith into reconnecting himself to the machines' source, at which point the machines were able to delete Smith's program and restore the Matrix. This sacrifice from Neo to save the Matrix brought peace between the machines and the humans.

Phixius

Question: Why does Neo need to be physically disconnected after appearing in the train station and speaking with the Oracle, when he ended up there through his connection with the Source?

Chosen answer: Because his physical body is unconscious and can't do what needs to be done in order to disconnect in the same way it connected.

Phixius

Question: This is the 6th iteration of Matrix and Neo succeeds in killing Smith by unbalancing the equation. But doesn't the equation get unbalanced when the previous 5 Neos don't succeed and die?

Chosen answer: Smith's being "set free" by Neo is something new to this iteration of the Matrix. The previous iterations simply ended and began anew, as was the machines' plan.

Captain Defenestrator

Question: Neo stopped five sentinels in the end of Matrix Reloaded, so why did he ask the Oracle in the beginning of The Matrix Revolutions to explain to him how could he stop four sentinels?

torpe555

Chosen answer: Because he misremembered. It was pretty high-stress moment and he blacked-out immediately. Not surprising he'd be a little hazy on the details.

Phixius

Question: The film states that Smith infected every single person in the Matrix. If that's the case, when the source deletes Smith, shouldn't that kill everyone in the Matrix? It killed Neo after all.

Brad

Chosen answer: It only killed Neo because the termination signal was sent directly through him. Everyone else was simply freed of Smith's corruptive programming.

Phixius

Question: I hope I'm not missing anything, but why do the machines allow Zion to be rebuilt each time the Matrix is renewed, the code returns to the source, etc. etc. and everything basically starts over? If people can consciously free themselves from The Matrix, fair enough, but wouldn't it just be easier for the machines to detach them, de-tank them and dunk them like they did to Neo? Otherwise they are in effect, re-creating their own enemies over and over again.

diesel123

Chosen answer: The machines use the humans as power so it stands to reason that they would want to hold onto as many humans as possible (even defective/inefficient ones). The Architect, in his enormous speech in Reloaded, states that the Zion "solution" was an acceptable (from the machine point-of-view) way of dealing with people who rejected the Matrix (less than 1% of the total pod-people population). Those freed would then free others who also reject the matrix (this is desirable for the machines as the disbelief could spread and result in more rejecting the matrix resulting in "crashes"). Once the Zion population gets too big the machines eradicate it and start again. So, yes, the machines are creating their own enemies, but strictly on their terms as part of the plan to keep the matrix going.

Sanguis

Question: This applies to both Revolutions and the first Matrix film really - why do the machines have no security around the Matrix itself? In the first film, Morpheus and co. are able to fly near enough to extract Neo once he's been de-tanked, and in Revolutions Neo and Trinity fly right by it - do the machines not think Zion might ever try and disable their main/only source of power, thus beating them once and for all?

diesel123

Chosen answer: The vast majority of the machines live in one central "Machine City" which we see in this movie and is located somewhere in the middle east (The Animatrix:The Second Renaissance), the huge towers we see Neo in when he is first freed are scattered around the earth built on the remnants of the human mega-cities (New York/London/Tokyo/etc). This means that a) they are very very big and b) they are very spread out. The tower/cities are protected by Sentinel patrols (and possibly other defences) and the amount of damage one lone Zion ship can cause is insignificant at best and it's implied that the machines have control over the creation of new humans, so any pod-people lost could quickly be "manufactured" and replaced.

Sanguis

Question: During Neo's final fight with Smith it looks as if Smith has turned every living person (including other "human" programmes) in The Matrix into versions of himself - have The Merovingian and Persephone also been captured and morphed? It's an odd thought that these two seemingly powerful figures would have given up without a fight, although The Oracle was turned too so it might not be implausible. Any mention of them again in any other media?

diesel123

Chosen answer: ##The Oracle deliberately choose to be assimilated so she could help Neo in the final fight. The Merovingian (and Persephone) had access to the Trainman and so, most likely, would have either hid in the machine world or in the Trainman's half-way Mobile Station. The both played a large role in the (now defunct) Matrix Online Massively Multi-player Online Role-Playing Game.

Sanguis

Question: If the machines have managed to locate Zion, wouldn't it have been easier for them to try and find the main door through which all the hovercrafts fly and blast their way through that, as opposed to digging through a HELL of a lot of pure rock to get into the city?

diesel123

Chosen answer: To do so, they'd have to search a vast labyrinth of tunnels under the earth, contending with human ships, booby traps, dead ends and so forth, plus they can guarantee that they'll be facing a defensive bottleneck of apocalyptic proportions. Once they establish the location, much easier to just take the direct route and drill straight down to it, rather than waste time and resources attempting to locate the entrance used by the human ships. Plus the drilling method has the added advantage of bypassing most of the Zion defence grid and putting their forces directly into the dock, rather than having to battle their way there.

Tailkinker

Question: Do the film's writers/creators ever explain why the machines choose to use humans as a power source over other, more efficient power sources such as nuclear power? (Nuclear power would require infinitely less maintenance and produce an infinitely higher power yield).

Chosen answer: Nuclear power requires fuel. If we switched to 100% nuclear power, we would run out of uranium in less than 200 years. Not a very good long term plan for machines who plan to live forever.

Myridon

Question: What exactly is the machine entity known as 'Deus Ex Machina'? Is it a physical representation of the machines? Or a separate being all together?

LazyBoy09

Chosen answer: The physical machine itself would serve a purpose around the machine city and it may be coincidental that that specific machine was used to communicate with Neo, but whilst talking to Neo it is a representative of the Machine Collective, an ambassador or diplomat of sorts.

Sanguis

Question: It's been stated that Seraph is a former angel programme left over from a previous Matrix. Then why does one of The Merovingian henchmen refer to him as wingless?

Socks1000

Chosen answer: A Seraph is the highest level of God's angels, typically depicted with six wings (three pairs), the joke refers to the fact that Seraph physically has no wings in the matrix and that he now no longer works for the machines and so is also meant as a "fall from grace" jibe.

Sanguis

Question: What exactly did the Architect mean when he said to the Oracle, "You played a very dangerous game"?

Socks1000

Chosen answer: By encouraging Neo to go to the machine city and negotiate a peace contract she has upset the Architect's "perfect" world. The Architect, ruled by brutal logic, has a method that is tried and true; the death and rebirth of Neo and Zion, the Oracle has created a new order of things and has allowed Zion to survive, throwing a rather large spanner in the Architect's plans.

Sanguis

Question: What are some of the plot points that are covered between Matrix Reloaded and Matrix Revolutions within the "Enter the Matrix" video game?

Steph_Jared

Chosen answer: The game covers the retrieval from a post office of the information about the sentinels digging (information we see dropped at a post box in the Animatrix), the escape from the ambush at the start (ie. what's happening inside while Neo fights the agents), Ghost and Niobe getting into the matrix and ending up in a car behind Morpheus, further exploration of the mansion the Keymaker's held in (including more details on the type of program Persephone kills, ie. vampire-like), the destruction of the power plant, and Niobe's arrival at the end in her ship. In terms of specific plot, from memory there's nothing particularly significant - the game fleshes out minor events not seen in the film, but there's no particularly new information.

Jon Sandys

Question: Do the names Sati, Rama-Kandra, and Kamala have special significance in Hindu culture or meanings in Hindi?

Chosen answer: Rama-Kandra is the combination of two ancient Hindu figures. Rama is the seventh incarnation of the god Vishnu and known for being a memorable hero. Kandra is the Hindu god of fertility. Then Rama-Kandra can be linked to the movie as the father of Sati (connected with fertility) and the man with wisdom and virtuosity (he talks with Neo about love and honour). Kamala is referred in Hindu tradition as counterpart for other gods, mainly because she represents the feminine side of the material world. Sati, on the other hand, does refer to a goddess, first wife of Lord shiva, mother figure, goddesses of war and fertility who protect her children (devotees) from demons.

Question: Sati is the daughter of two programs..I really don't understand how two programs can mate. How's it possible?

Chosen answer: Some Matrix programs have become so sophisticated that they are self-aware and much like humans. Keeping with that, Sati's "parents" wrote her using some of their own code, thus, she is their daughter.

Grumpy Scot

Question: Does anyone know how long the war with the machines has actually been going on or what year it actually is in the real world?

Chosen answer: I don't think anybody knows - Morpheus says in the first film that the year is not 1999 as Neo thinks, but closer to 2199, but they don't know for sure. They just know the war started 'early in the 21st century' so presumably anywhere between 2000-2025.

Sam Johnson

Question: Did the filmmakers gave a reason why there were numerous biblical references in the trilogy?

Onesimos

Chosen answer: The movies are about the coming of savior (Neo/Jesus), a war to end the world (Armeggedon), an evil force that enslaves mankind (machines/AntiChrist), etc., etc., etc. Since the Bible is greatest common point of cultural reference in Western culture, it would be extremely hard to make a movie with this plot without making a Biblical reference to some degree. Even if it had been made by Bollywood about Vishnu and Krishna, when shown in the West it could have had Biblical comparisons drawn.

Myridon

Question: How was Sati able to create the sunrise/set at the end?

Chosen answer: Sati is the "daughter" of two other programs, so it would make sense she was a program herself. Maybe she was created to supervise the sunset. Or she was just using her influence as a program in the matrix to create the sunset.

Question: What is the silver necklace that Zee gives to Link?

Chosen answer: Pretty much a good luck charm.

T Poston

Question: On the DVD, for 2 frames at 0:17:42, I see the number "506" go across the screen, from right to left, Trinity's arm then the guy's back. Does anyone else have that, or is it my copy?

Chosen answer: I'd say that it is. I went through the scene six times, didn't see it.

Question: Can someone explain exactly what shaft entrance was blocked by all those big explosions after which Lock says "your move?" It can't be the entrance to the temple, since we see the Kid run from the dock to the temple in about 5 seconds to tell Zion that the machines have left. So what shaft was it?

Chosen answer: The temple is located at the very bottom of Zion right at the bottom of the living quarters (possibly the engineering level is deeper) while teh dock is above the living quarters. To get from the dock to there there is a long lift shaft (which is seen in reloaded) and it is that shaft which Lock blocks.

Question: When Neo and Trinity reached the Machine City, or really got close to it, couldn't they have blown an EMP thus destroying all the machines and causing the war to end? In fact, couldn't one ship from the fleet have done that some other times before this event?

Chosen answer: Trinity and Neo's ship is very badly damaged in the approach to the Machine City, so there is no guarantee that the EMP still works. They don't know the exact location of the Deus Ex Machina either, so any blow could just knock out a few hundred Sentinels instead of causing lasting damage. No other ship has ever penetrated the Machines' defensive grid, the one that Neo destroys through his connection with the Source.

Phoenix

Question: Can someone reiterate the reason the Oracle gives for why her face is different?

Chosen answer: Because she was helping Neo, Agent Smith damaged her program causing her to have to change appearance.

Dean McDermott 1

Question: When are heroes encounter the Merovingian in the club, what is it he says to them in french?

Chosen answer: He says Quel Grand Surprise which translated means what a big surprise.

Question: Why did the Wachowskis kill Trinity in Reloaded, bring her back to life, and kill her again in this film? The Architect said no matter what Trinity was going to die, so Neo should have just gone straight to the Source in Reloaded and destroy it.

Chosen answer: Neo had no concrete reasons to believe the Architect. He was madly in love (yeah, tell me you would have let your true love die if you knew you could save her!) with Trinity and unwilling to let her die without at least trying. And the directors must have thought it would play more tragically to save her only to lose her later.

Grumpy Scot

Question: Someone made this trivia contribution: "At the end of the movie where the Oracle is talking to the Architect, there is a plaque on the bench she is sitting on which says 'In memory of Thomas A. Anderson.'" Where did this come from? At no point in the movie is there a clear shot of the plaque to make out its words, and in no behind the scene specials does anyone mention that last scene.

Kirill Ostapenko

Chosen answer: Its in the special features on the DVD for Matrix RELOADED (not Revolutions, even though that's where the bench features). One of the people interviewed is sitting on it and the plaque can be read.

Question: People are saying that Neo is dead. But the Oracle said to Sati 'it is likely that we will see him one day'. Is she talking about the next version of the Matrix? I feel kind of sad about the ending, I wanted a happy ending, not a horrible sad ending.

Chosen answer: It is not clear whether Neo is dead or not, so the Oracle may be alluding to the fact that he is still alive or that there will be a future "One".

Sol Parker

Question: What exactly is this "life force" Neo sees after Bane blinds him?

Chosen answer: It is the connection he has to the Source. Like when he sees the Machine City and the Sentinels.

Kirill Ostapenko

Question: When Neo and Trinity are about to take off in the Logos to go to the Machine City, and after she goes down to check the problem and Bane attacks her, she goes up the ladder and calls for Neo on the intercom. However, right after she got up the ladder Bane grabs her foot and she proceeds to kick him, knocking back down the ladder. Why didn't she use this chance to lock him in? You can't open it from below. Yes, he could still mess with the ships operations, however they could've gotten a gun, opened it up, and shot him; it'd be as easy as shooting fish in a barrel.

Azureth

Chosen answer: He would have still been able to open the hatch up. It's a maintenance room, not a "lock-up" room. Someone in this room would still be able to open it from the inside.

XIII

Question: At the end of Revolutions, Smith's body (or bodies I should say) is destroyed in the same manner it was destroyed at the end of the first film. But after he was destroyed the first time, he simply came back and started spreading. What's stopping him from simply returning the same way he did after his first "death"?

Chosen answer: The answer to this comes from Reloaded. Smith says that after he died, he was supposed to go back to the source, to be deleted (this is clarified by the Oracle). However, he didn't and in effect became a virus in the system. When he infected Neo, who was connected to the source, the source destroyed him.

SexyIrishLeprechaun

Question: The war between humans and machines started because machines needed a source of power and created the Matrix to hold humans in bondage while they were used as batteries. Now that humans are free to leave the Matrix, won't the machines start losing their source of power, causing them to force humans back into bondage, restarting the war?

Chosen answer: The war didn't start because the machines needed a source of power; it had been running for quite some time by then. It was the humans who began the war because they weren't prepared to share a world with sentient machines. This is explained in the animated film "The Animatrix", or also in the supplements on the second disc of the "Matrix Revolutions" DVD. And while it is true that humans are now free to leave the Matrix, there's no guarantee that everyone who is given the choice will choose to leave. Remember Cypher from the first film? He preferred to stay IN the Matrix rather than live in the real world. Many others may do the same. And further still, it may be that most humans WILL choose to leave the Matrix and the machines may break the peace because they are losing their energy source. The Architect alludes to this when he says "How long do you think this peace will last?" and the Oracle responds "As long as it can." There are a myriad possibilities now.

Phil C.

Question: Near the end of the Super Brawl, when Neo is lying on the ground helpless. Why does Agent Smith appear to act frightened and worried after he has said "Everything that has a beginning, has an end, Neo." Is it because it will mean he too has an end? And what made him say it?

Chosen answer: This is an echo of a line spoken to Neo by the Oracle earlier in the film. It's hard to say for certain, but I believe that given the disruption to the Matrix when Smith took over the Oracle's body, it's likely she somehow weakened him. She puts these words into Smith's head to spur Neo on - Smith is worried because he has realised what she's done.

Shay

Question: I've never understood how the humans have such hi-tech technology. All of the hovercraft, APUs etc. How did they get them in the first place? The way I understand it is that the machines and the humans had a massive war at some point in the early 21st century (according to Morpheus) and, although the war is still going on now, the machines have effectively won. Humans forced into one city underground and the machines with all their...machines. I don't understand how the humans can use hovercraft, guns, etc. when surely they would have all had to have been made while they were in their little city.

Sam Johnson

Chosen answer: If you watch the Animatrix it explains the whole plot, half of the machinery was constructed in Zion, while all the hovercraft's are what remains from the day before the war, and the APUs look like they have been constructed in Zion and used for construction, the guns and ammo packs are mountable.

Kirill Ostapenko

Question: Why is it that in such a highly technological society, the humans must do with a group of APUs shooting two machine guns and a large tower firing several other machine guns. Why don't they have something like tank shells or impact grenades as they seem like they would be a lot more destructive power?

Chosen answer: The APU use tank piercing bullets that are more suited then projectiles. And an invasion straight into the dock was never thought of.

Kirill Ostapenko

Question: I understand why Commander Loch never had an EMP installed in Zion in case of an attack, but shouldn't there be one anyways just in case Zion is completely overrun and the last few survivors could use the EMP to destroy what Sentinels have invaded?

Chosen answer: There's no real point - if Zion is overrun, there is no place left for the rebels to go. Yes, they could take perhaps a few hundred Sentinels with them, but they know that won't really do any good against the massive resources of the robots. And the old argument still applies - if it was set off by accident, that EMP would destroy all of Zion's electronics, rendering them virtually helpless.

Phoenix

Question: I am confused as to what happens to Sati. Is she the new One, succeeding Neo? Or did the Merovingian simply ensure that she could survive the Smith infection? In either case, where does the Merovingian, one program with power over only other programs, get the ability to guarantee either of these results?

Phoenix

Chosen answer: When Neo destroys Smith, all effects of Smith were undone, or something like that. There are those who say that everyone in the Matrix had become a Smith which is why the machines needed Neo's help because the situation was out of control.

Sol Parker

Question: So how exactly did Neo defeat Smith? The only possibility I can think of is that since Neo is connected to the Deus Ex Machina, he gets infected with Smith and then the Machine God can destroy the program in Neo thus causing a chain reaction. So am I right?

Chosen answer: You are right. In "Reloaded" the Oracle tells Neo that when programs face deletion they either go to the source to be recycled back into the matrix code, or go into exile. Smith went into exile but effectively "returned to the source" when he infected Neo, who was connected directly to the source.

Nick N.

Question: Through what method does Neo have a connection to the machine world?

Kirill Ostapenko

Chosen answer: The Architect says it is because he took the second door (to rescue Trinity) that no one else ever has before. This somehow (not explained in detail) gave him a connection to the machines.

Grumpy Scot

Question: Who wrote the music heard during the Neo vs Smith fight scene?

Chosen answer: Juno Reactor Vs. Don Davis wrote this and many of the fighting scene scores for the Matrix.

Question: Does Neo die at the end? The end of the film kind of left me wondering whether he was dead or just comatose or something like that, while the machines carried him off.

Chosen answer: Pretty sure he's dead. It would be in keeping with the Christian themes found in the movie. The One died to save the world.

Nikki

Question: Why is Agent Smith able to fly at the end of this film? He must've picked it up sometime between the Burly Brawl and the Super Brawl, but I have no idea how.

Nick N.

Chosen answer: Agent Smith is on a hyper-advanced learning curve because of all the personalities he has been integrating. Flying is certainly not the only advance - he's developed control over the weather, has superfast healing, and probably has limited precognition after his encounter with the Oracle.

Rooster of Doom

Question: Okay first of all, what happened to the Twins? They didn't die in Reloaded for as they flew into the air, they shifted to their ghost forms thus keeping them safe. Second; what was the reason the French Man's wife kissed Neo in Reloaded? I heard that she was supposed to be some type of vampire and have a bigger role in this movie. Was that scene cut out?

Chosen answer: They never explain what happened to the twins. Persephone kissed Neo because she wanted to remember what true love felt like.

Question: What is the name of the style of the Merovingian's tie knot? How is it done? He also has a different mystery style in the dinner and fight scenes in Reloaded.

Chosen answer: In Reloaded the knot always looked to me as if it's a regular necktie, tied in a windsor knot, only backwards. At a lot of angles it's tricky to see, but the narrow end of the blade is at the front, and the wide end is at the back. Tie a windsor and turn it around, you'll see. One method to duplicate the Merovingian's knot from Revolutions is to first tie a normal Windsor knot. Then with the small blade of the tie from behind, wrap it loosely around the base of the knot twice, tucking it through the loop you've just made down the back again.

Question: When Neo and Trinity are flying towards the machine city, a sentinel hovers in front of the hovercraft and flies directly into the windshield. In later scenes the glass is not broken so it couldn't have gone through the ship (no physical damage either) but it flies through Neo in the "Matrix vision" and it obviously affects him. I don't understand what happens here.

Chosen answer: He felt its 'consciousness', or rather its life force. When the Sentinel was destroyed, its machine essence remained suspended, and Neo felt it.

furious1116

Question: I really don't get the ending of the movie. Nothing actually changes, the Matrix still exists, making humans prisoners until they are used as batteries and Zion still exists. But wasn't the whole point of Zion and its inhabitants to free people so they aren't used as power cells? The machines are still using people as energy and no one is bothered by that? Doesn't that make all three movies kind of pointless?

troy fox

Chosen answer: The Architect says to the Oracle in the final scene that those who wish to be freed will be. He is, naturally, referring to those humans still inside the Matrix. It is reasonable to assume that the people of Zion will continue to contact those inside the Matrix, and now that the Architect has promised they will be freed without a struggle, there is no longer a reason for conflict between the machines and humans. Check out this link from a user review who explained it in very good detail. http://movies.yahoo.com/mvc/drv?mid=1808402448.

Phil C.

Question: When Neo meets the Oracle in her kitchen he asks why she didn't tell him what was going on before. She tells him he knows and points to a sign above the beaded door. Is this a latin phrase? What does it mean?

Chosen answer: In the first film she points this same sign out to Neo and explains that it means "Know Thyself"

Question: Every ship in the fleet has got an EMP, why didn't they build one at the platform?

Chosen answer: They never wanted to have the possibility of it getting set off accidentally, as it would render the entire dock area (and possible more) inert instantly. In fact, they probably weren't terribly prepared for the Sentinels ever to find/reach their location. In 100 years, they hadn't yet.

Rooster of Doom

Question: After Neo beats Smith, what is stopping the machines from destroying Zion anyway? It's not like they can't go back on their word.

Chosen answer: Twice we see reference to an intriguing quality about machines: they apparently can't break their promises. The Frenchman is trusted in the "Hell" scene when he promises the three safe passage (if anyone is NOT to be trusted, it is him), and the architect's last line "what do you think I am, human?" reflects that same idea - a human would betray his word, a machine wouldn't.

Grumpy Scot

Question: Commander Lock states that he wants to use all the APCs, half the infantry and any volunteers to defend the dock. I was wondering why half the infantry apparently consists of four people carrying a grand total of two rocket launchers. (And . These guys could be taken out by red hot ejected shell casings from one of the other APCs. Even hockey players wear visors.

Chosen answer: The answer is simple. The rocket launcher carriers are all volunteers, the half infantry is the group of people with electro-guns that are behind the doors where the ammo is stored, you can also see them in a large group just as the machines stop attacking. In regards to the A.P.U. (they are not called A.P.C.s) question, the people of Zion probably would not have the needed technology or resources for the extra protection. Anyway, why put up a window to 'protect' them? If it smashed (and it almost certainly would), the driver would be showered with sharp, hot shards of glass or something, putting him in more danger. Plus, it probably would obscure his vision and restrict his movement. It's also shown in the Animatrix that machines would have no problem removing such a cover.

Question: Given most of the Characters are called by their 'hacker' names in the real world, why is the Captain of the Hammer called Roland? Does this have any biblical/mythical significance?

Chosen answer: I think he could be named after the legendary Roland from European mythology. Roland was Emperor Charlemagne's nephew, I think. He and his friend died fighting off the treacherous Moors, supposedly. Roland was really big in medieval beliefs.

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In Greek mythology Persephone was the wife of Hades, ruler of Hell. Persephone is the wife of the Merovingian, ruler of the Hell Club.

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