Clash of the Titans

Corrected entry: When Kalibos attacks Perseus in the swamp, similar to Andromeda's visit, claymation was used instead of the actual actor.

oprlvr33

Correction: This is far too common in the film to be considered a mistake. Many characters in the film are created by regularly alternating between live action and stop-motion (not claymation).

Jason Hoffman

Corrected entry: The title of this movie is actually a misnomer. Neither Medusa nor the Kraken are Titans. Medusa was a Gorgon and the Kraken was put in place of the historical sea monster, Cetus (who wasn't a Titan, either). Just as well, none of the other mythological creatures/characters are Titans, either.

Correction: Within this film the Kraken IS a titan. Zeus refers to the Kraken as "the last of the titans". The title comes from Perseus' exchange with the witches about using Medusa's head to kill the Kraken. One of the witches exclaims "A titan vs. a titan!"

Jason Hoffman

Corrected entry: in the scene near the end where Andromeda exits her bath and in to awaiting towels,she gets very dry in no time, from the front there is not a drop of water anywhere.

Correction: When the shot changes to her front, she is covered from the neck down by a very thick sheet, so there's no way to tell is she's wet or not.

Jason Hoffman

Corrected entry: When Ammon examines Perseus' new sword, he comments that it is neither bronze nor iron. Iron was not known to the Greeks until the Dorian invasion, which occurred at about 1150 BC - long after the period in which Perseus was supposed to have lived.

Correction: Iron weapons and iron tools were not commonly used until c. 1130 BC, but iron itself was hardly unknown. It was simply more difficult and expensive to obtain iron by refining iron ore than it was to mine workable tin and copper directly from the ground. For many years (4000 to 6000 years ago) iron was more valuable than gold because of the difficulty and expense of the refining process. Iron was widely known but rarely used.

Mobrien316

Corrected entry: When Perseus is watching the suitor being burned and is talking to Thallo about the riddle that each suitor must answer, Thallo states "and those who fail do not tell what they were asked". This suggests that each riddle is kept secret from all except the suitor. When the queen asks Perseus the riddle, however, everyone in the kingdom is gathered in the temple and listening, so the riddle is not kept a secret at all. Anyone who was there would know what the riddle was.

Eric Siegel

Correction: He simply says the suitors do not tell what they were asked. The people in attendance when the riddle is asked are free to tell, but they are obviously royals/elite. The riddle would not be known to the commoners.

Jason Hoffman

Corrected entry: When Perseus goes to get water for Pegasus, he uses the helmet that "makes its wearer invisible." If so, the water would have disappeared.

Stephen Lee

Correction: This is a magic helmet...it can make its wearer invisible, but the water not only wasn't wearing the helmet, but the helmet wouldn't have made something inanimate, non-living, and non-Greek-heroic invisible.

scwilliam

Corrected entry: When Pegasus is being tamed and Perseus leaps onto his back and then cuts the rope around Pegasus's neck, the wide sweep of his sword, at that angle, would not have been able to cut the loop around its neck (at least not without causing a bad wound).

Correction: He did not cut the loop around the horses neck. He cut the rope leading away from the loop. Which is why Ammon falls from holding the rope. The tesion was released. You can see Persues hold the rope loop while riding Pegasus in later shots.

Corrected entry: When Perseus wakes up in Joppa, Caliban's curse is already in effect and several suitors have already been burnt. Yet Perseus was transported there the same night that Zeus transformed Caliban into a monster, so when did all this happen?

Correction: It is understood that time passes much more slowly for the gods on Mount Olympus, so while it may have taken Zeus only a moment to make the change, it is possible days or even weeks passed on Earth.

Corrected entry: Throughout the movie, the sea monster Perseus kills is referred to as the "Kraken." The movie is based on Greek myth, but a "kraken" is a monster from Norse myth.

Correction: Though it may be technically incorrect, many other tellings of this myth include calling it a kraken, while those that don't just call it a sea monster from which we can assume that it has no specific Greek name. Therefore, kraken can be used just like a copy made on a Ricoh machine is a xerox (kraken is not listed as a proper noun in most dictionaries), and any large mysterious hairy humanoid might be grouped as a "Big Foot" despite it's country of origin.

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Mistakes

In the beginning scene, the ruler of Argos is condemning his daughter and son to the sea with a group of guards present at the shore. While he is giving his speech, there is a brief moment when the whole group can be seen getting drenched by a wave crashing ashore, but in the very next moment of his speech - even up to the daughter's cast off - no one is wet.

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Trivia

In Greek mythology, the winged stallion Pegasus was actually spawned in the moment when Medusa was killed by Perseus; he sprang out of her severed neck.

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