The Wizard of Oz

Question: It is implied strongly in this movie that water makes witches melt, and this is spoofed in other media. I've only ever seen this referenced to wicked witches. Does water make good witches, such as Glinda, melt too?

Chosen answer: In all likelihood, probably not. Water is often depicted and represents purity, and cleansing. It flows smoothly, is beautiful, clear, and responsible for life on Earth. Everything the Wicked Witch is not. Where as the good Witch is pure and of a true heart. So it makes sense that something so evil and impure as the evil witch would be effected by the purest substance there is, yet not harm the good witch because she is good.

Quantom X

Question: I've read all 4 books in the series of The Wizard of Oz. But I'm confused on the shadow puppet. A character? Or a story telling method?

SueW

Chosen answer: First off, there's fourteen Oz books written by Baum (the last two published posthumously). And secondly, what shadow puppet are you referring to?

Garlonuss

Question: More of an observation than a question, but it has occurred to me that the movie leaves a rather significant loose end unresolved. At the beginning of the film, Miss Gulch is going to have Toto destroyed. Nothing happens to change that. Dorothy's adventure/dream in Oz didn't get rid of the real woman back in Kansas who wants her dog dead. Am I missing something, or are we just to assume that because Toto got free from the basket, Miss Gulch didn't notice?

Chosen answer: It is highly assumed that Miss Gulch died in the tornado - she was riding her bike at the time the tornado hit. Many sites online support this theory.Other than that it is never mentioned.

MasterOfAll

Question: At the very end of the movie after Dorothy says "Oh, Auntie Em, there's no place like home," normally, it fades out to the credits, but once - and only once - when I was very young, I thought I remembered seeing the camera pan away from her face and down to the foot of the bed where you see the ruby slippers tucked underneath the bed, then a fade to the credits. It is obviously a black-and-white shot, but there were the glittering shoes. Has anyone else seen this version of the ending?

Reformed Dispatcher

Chosen answer: Yes. I'm sure I've seen that version. It shows that Dorothy didn't just dream about Oz and makes for a more satisfying conclusion. This version was original but edited out because it didn't follow the book's storyline for "Return to Oz" and the other long series of Oz books. The sequel pertains that she loses the slippers in transit back to her home and falls to the gnome king who destroys Oz which in turn causes Dorothy to return. So seeing the slippers at the end of the bed, while more satisfying, wouldn't really stay true to the Oz series.

Question: Did Dorothy really go to Oz or was it a dream? Because, in return to Oz at the end, she sees Ozma (the good witch in her mirror) or was that just her imagination/a dream too?

Chosen answer: In the film it's left ambiguous. At the end it's strongly implied that she was dreaming. The characters she meets all look like people she actually knows. In the original book, she actually went to Oz.

Jason Hoffman

Question: Does anyone know what Dorothy's last name was? As far as I know I haven't seen it mentioned in the movie.

Chosen answer: It's 'Gale', and it is mentioned in the movie when Dorothy tells the Good Witch 'I'm Dorothy Gale, from Kansas'.

Blibbetyblip

Question: I saw a question about where the Red Brick road leads to. Someone answered it by saying that it lead to the Sapphire City. Is this true? If so, is there a movie where I would see it?

Chosen answer: While there is a Sapphire City in Oz, there's no evidence to suggest that the Red Brick Road leads there. The Red Brick Road does not appear in any of Baum's books and appears to be entirely an invention for the movie. As such, it's quite likely that it was created purely for aesthetic purposes and no specific destination was ever decided upon, as it bore no relevance to the plot. The Sapphire City appears in only one book in the series (The Giant Horse of Oz) and has never been seen in a movie.

Tailkinker

Question: What is in the background (in the woods) after Dorothy first meets the tin man?

mpiwalsh

Chosen answer: You are no doubt referring to the old "urban legend" that a Munchkin actor who, despondent over a failed love affair with a Munchkin actress, committed suicide on the movie set, and his lifeless body can be seen hanging in the background trees. This never happened, of course, but there have been countless rumors as to just what people think they are seeing. The most plausible explanation is that this is probably one of the many live birds that were used to add realism to the set, and it may have been one of the larger birds, such as an emu or a crane, that was standing in the background. It has also been pointed out (see Snopes.com) that this particular scene was filmed "before" any of the Munchkin actors were working on the sound stage, and it would be impossible for there to have been a dead body on a movie set without the many crew noticing it. Also, the idea that the filmmakers would use a scene in which a dead body appeared in their finished film or that a suspended body could go undetected while filming is underway is beyond belief.

raywest

Question: During the scene in the Poppy field, does the Scarecrow fall asleep or is it just Dorothy and the Lion?

Chosen answer: The Scarecrow does not fall asleep as he does not have a real nose, the same for the Tin Man, although the latter rusts because he is crying.

Question: I've been wondering this since I was very little. When The Wizard of Oz was first released in theaters in 1939, was Oz in color or is that only for the televised version? This has been bugging me for years.

Chosen answer: The Emerald City was, indeed, presented in color in the original 1939 film. In fact, even Kansas was not originally purely black-and-white. The Kansas scenes were initially sepia tinted. Later prints showed Kansas in black-and-white. The original sepia tones were returned in the 1989 restoration for the film's 50th anniversary.

Michael Albert

Question: According to imdb.com, the woman who provided Snow White's voice in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs also provides the voice for a character named Juliet in this film. Does anyone know who this is supposed to be?

Chosen answer: In the film, when we hear a female voice ask, "Wherefore art thou Romeo?" it is in fact Juliet that asks that question - as in "Romeo and Juliet."

Super Grover

Question: Could someone tell me more about the scene in which a person is rumoured to be hanging themselves? I know its not true and all. I'm just curious about it.

Chosen answer: According to snopes.com it's an emu or a crane that is flapping its wings in the background. Check it out here: http://www.snopes.com/movies/films/ozsuicid.htm

Nikki

Question: There has been a rumor that in the Wizard of Oz that there was a ghost figure that just appeared for a split second right after Dorothy, the Tinman, and the Scarecrow left the area (The same scene that was rumored that there was a munchkin suicide was). Could someone please tell me what it was?

blonddude207

Chosen answer: The rumor was that you could see someone hanging from a tree in the background as they are in the forest. either just after they find the lion or the tin man. This is just a urban legend according to everything I have ever read. It was rumored to be either an extra killing himself over a lost love, and also a producer killing himself because the movie was way over budget. Neither confirmed at all.

Kimberly Mason

Question: In one of the previous questions answered, it mentioned the ending originally panned down to show the Ruby Slippers near Dorothy's bed and thus confirming she didn't dream the whole story. I was just wondering if there's a youtube link or movie clip of this scene?

Chosen answer: Actually, all of the information points that the scene never existed. The movie deals with Oz as being an escape, a dream land. The book deals with Oz being a real place visited by Dorothy. Finding the shoes under the bed sounds like something from the book, but it isn't there either. The slippers are lost forever in the book.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wizard_of_Oz_%281939_film%29http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wizard_of_Oz_book_to_film_comparisonhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wonderful_Wizard_of_Oz

Rlvlk

Question: After the witch is crushed by the house and confirmed by the coroner, a munchkin says, "This is a day of independence for all the munchkins and their descendants." After this, a different munchkin adds "If any." I have always wanted to know what is meant by "if any."

Chosen answer: The one munchkin thinks they have been liberated by the wicked witch's death. The second munchkin, who says, "If any," apparently realises that the dead witch's more evil sister will probably seek revenge and kill everyone, which would mean there would be no descendants.

raywest

Question: When Dorothy is in Munchkinland and she starts off on the Yellow Brick Road, it spirals around with a Red Brick Road before splitting off toward the Emerald City. Where does the Red Brick Road lead to?

Chosen answer: It is assumed that it goes towards the Sapphire City, but this is up for debate, as 1) it is never mentioned nor shown in a movie relating to Oz, and 2) the red road was not in the book series, and was purely added to the movie for aesthetics.

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