The Wizard of Oz

Corrected entry: "The Wizard Of Oz" is apparently set at or about 1900. The wide rubber tire tied to a tree limb as a swing and seen several times early in the film is of much more modern vintage.

martylee13045

Correction: I believe this is not an accurate assessment regarding the time-setting, as Toto jumps into the seat of a tractor during "Over the Rainbow," also the fashions of 1900 America would never allow Dorothy Gale (or any female) to show their ankles; however it would make sense for Miss Gulch's fashion sense to be 20-30 years behind the times. Also note that Miss Gulch's bicycle is not turn-of-the-century; the Wizard states, when he was "acclaimed Oz, the first Wizard de Luxe," that, "times being what they were, I took the job," an explicit reference to the Depression, which was of course occurring at the time. Just a few observations. :).

1

Corrected entry: The Director - Victor Fleming, was working on "Gone with the Wind" at the same time.

Correction: Not true. He moved on to Gone with the Wind when most of Oz was finished. King Vidor came in and finished the Kansas scenes.

1

Corrected entry: Even though he left production due to serious health problems, Buddy Ebsen actually does appear twice in movie in two different roles. First time he appears as Scarecrow (role for which he was originally cast) in first scenes with Dorothy. He is shown couple of times from behind. Second time he appears when Scarecrow, Tin Man and Lion come to Witch's castle to rescue Dorothy. He plays Tin Man in all shots which shows three heroes from behind, including shot of them marching into castle.

mirtom

Correction: Not true. Ebsen was recast as the Tin Man before any footage was shot. And all of his scenes as the Tin Man were reshot after his departure. The hair, costumes, and makeup were all different from his time on the film so there would have been dramatic mis-matches.

dodgersfan7800
1

Corrected entry: When the Wicked Witch of the West is writing the message in the sky for Dorothy, she begins with one letter. Two shots later, the entire message is written, without enough time for her to have written it all.

hlj67

Correction: They do this all the time in movies. There's no reason to make the audience sit through the Witch writing the entire message, so if they show a beginning and an end, the audience knows the message had been written.

1

Corrected entry: Regarding the Tin Man: tin doesn't rust.

Correction: "The Tin Man" is merely a name Dorothy gives him when she sees he's silver. What he's actually made of is never stated.

White Lock
1

Corrected entry: Before Dorothy walks on the pig sty, Uncle Henry can be seen on the far right side of the screen. He stops, stands there for about 10 seconds and then walks to the right. In the next shot he's gone. (00:03:45)

????

Correction: In this scene the camera never swings back far enough to see him again.

1

Corrected entry: In the poppy field the tin man says "this is terrible" but his lips don't match up with what he's saying. (00:55:55)

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Correction: It's the Scarecrow that says, "This is terrible", not Tin Man.

1

Corrected entry: In the beginning, after the Wicked Witch talks to Glinda and Dorothy, she goes to disappear into the trap door. You can see she doesn't remember where the trap door is and has to go around in a circle to get to it. (00:30:45)

Correction: It does not appear that she is unable to find the trap door; she makes the circle to sweep her skirt around her for dramatic effect before she disappears.

BocaDavie Premium member
1

Corrected entry: Before Dorothy goes home, she says a long and tearful goodbye to the Scarecrow, Tin Man, and Lion. But originally she was going to fly off in a balloon with the Wizard, and just happened to jump out of the basket at the last second. Wouldn't she have already said her goodbyes before that? (Not that she wouldn't have said goodbye again, but the second time would have sounded a little different.)

Krista

Correction: This is a question, not a mistake. She was obviously going to say her goodbyes from inside the basket before taking off. When the balloon left without her she said her goodbyes on the ground instead.

BocaDavie Premium member
1

Corrected entry: During one of the times the cast sings "We're off to see the Wizard" (either after they meet the Tin Man or the Cowardly Lion), as they begin to walk off, above the main characters there is visible the sillhouette of a crew member swinging an arm projected onto the backdrop from behind it.

Correction: No, this is part of the infamous "hanging munchkin" scene. That is not the arm of a stagehand, it is one of the free-roaming birds extending it's wing. You can see it for yourself at the link given at the top of the main page for The Wizard of Oz.

Guy
1

Corrected entry: Judy Garland was actually born Frances Ethel Gumm, and changed her name in 1939.

Correction: Trivia, perhaps, but not for this movie.

Phixius Premium member
1

Corrected entry: When the Lion is running out of the Wizard's chamber down the long green hallway, take a close look at the face of the Lion as he is running, just before he leaps into the glass window - it is clearly NOT Bert Lahr, but a younger, thinner stand-in. (01:12:35)

Correction: That probably was his stunt double, but I'm sorry it is impossible to tell. His entire costume was heavily padded, there's no way to tell his weight. His face was a mask except for his mouth, there's no way to tell it's a younger guy. My only explanation for you is you're so convinced it's obvious as you know it's the stunt double.

1

Corrected entry: After the severe injuries that she received earlier in the production Margret Hamilton closes her eyes in anticipation of the orange smoke that engulfs her as she disappears from the roof after she throws the ball of fire at the scarecrow. (00:46:25)

????

Correction: Why exactly isn't the witch allowed to close her eyes? I haven't gotten severe injuries and I would've shut my eyes if smoke was about to engulf me. There's no reason for her not to close her eyes.

1

Corrected entry: When The Scarecrow says that he can be released from the pole by 'Turning that nail', the pole holding him up is briefly shown - it's obvious that the pole goes up *inside* his jacket - therefore, he couldn't fall down & forward to be free of the pole; the best he could do is fall to the ground with a pole up the back of his shirt.

Correction: The pole is not up under his shirt - he's held up by wires.

????
1

Corrected entry: When Aunt Em is taking the chicks out of the incubator and putting them in Uncle Henry's hat, you can see that she is just pretending and there is nothing in her hands. (00:02:35)

Correction: She puts them in her apron and she actually has chicks in her hand.

????
1

Corrected entry: In the scene where Dorothy tells the scarecrow that he can go with her to see the wizard he yells "Hooray." If you listen closely you can hear him say 'hooray' quietly few seconds before this but his mouth isn't moving.

Correction: The audio here is not overdubbed and this doesn't happen.

????
1

Corrected entry: In the scene where Dorothy starts at the beginning of the yellow brick road, which is a spiral, at her second revolution, you can see the Mayor in the scene to the right. As Dorothy gets near the low huts the scene switches. As she goes out of town, you see the Mayor again alongside the road on the right.

Correction: He had plenty of time to get there.

????
1

Corrected entry: As Dorothy sings "Over the Rainbow" Toto is looking at his trainer off camera as he gets his cue to give her his paw. (00:07:25)

????

Correction: OR he's just looking around, as dogs do. A dog glancing over an actor's shoulder is hardly a movie mistake.

1

Corrected entry: The day Judy Garland died, a tornado struck Kansas.

Correction: Interesting coincidence, but not trivia for the film.

1

Corrected entry: When the Wicked Witch reaches down to take the ruby slippers off of Dorothy's feet, the shoes are glittering. Once the sparks start flying from the slippers, the glittering stops.

Correction: It's said in this movie that they have powerful magic. It's very likely that was the result of the powerful magic it had to use to make the sparks fly.

1

Revealing mistake: When the Lion runs out of the Wizard's room, the group disappears because it is an obvious backdrop.

Sacha Premium member
More mistakes in The Wizard of Oz

Dorothy: How can you talk if you haven't got a brain?
Scarecrow: I don't know. But some people without brains do an awful lot of talking, don't they?

More quotes from The Wizard of Oz

Trivia: Professor Marvel, the Cabbie, the doorman, the guard, and the wizard himself are all the same actor, Frank Morgan.

More trivia for The Wizard of Oz

Question: It is implied strongly in this movie that water makes witches melt, and this is spoofed in other media. I've only ever seen this referenced to wicked witches. Does water make good witches, such as Glinda, melt too?

Answer: In all likelihood, probably not. Water is often depicted and represents purity, and cleansing. It flows smoothly, is beautiful, clear, and responsible for life on Earth. Everything the Wicked Witch is not. Where as the good Witch is pure and of a true heart. So it makes sense that something so evil and impure as the evil witch would be effected by the purest substance there is, yet not harm the good witch because she is good.

Quantom X Premium member

Answer: In the original book, water caused the wicked witches to melt away because they were so old and shriveled that all the fluid in their bodies had long since dried away. Meanwhile, the film Oz: The Great and Powerful instead implies that the Wicked Witch of the West is weak against water due to being a fire-elemental witch, which could also be the case for this incarnation, meaning it wouldn't apply to other witches like Glinda (whose element in both films appears to be ice) or even the Wicked Witch of the East (whose powers are never shown in this film, but were electricity-based in Oz the Great and Powerful).

More questions & answers from The Wizard of Oz

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