Titanic

Question: One of the mistakes lists that when Rose and Jack are running away from the water below decks, you can see the real faces of the stunt doubles they used. I have tried to find any differences in their faces but I cannot find it. How can you tell they are stunt doubles?

Answer: It is not the faces of the stunt doubles, but the faces of the actors superimposed. It is very obvious when Rose is running in slow motion toward the camera with Jack behind her. The water is rising, and the lights are flickering. Her face is very pale, almost transparent, and seems "big" for her head. Also, the bobbing movements of her head don't exactly match that of the filming of the stunt double, which indicates the effects team did the best they could with Kate Winslet's face superimposed onto a different female with a different head shape.

Macalou

Question: While the ship is sinking, Rose must use the lifts to get to Jack. The lift man tells her the lifts are closed. She then pins him against the wall, yells something, and then screams 'Now take me down to E deck'. Just what does she yell?

Answer: She said, "I'm through being polite God damn it now take me down."

Answer: I just watch the clip on YouTube. Rose says, "I'm through being polite, god damn it. Now take me down."

raywest Premium member

Answer: "I'm through with being polite, goddamnit! I may never be polite the rest of my life!"

David Mercier

Question: One person asked about Rose and Cal's "love life" which was answered with something about it being "active". Surely, Rose should have been pregnant by then if they had slept together quite a few times?

Answer: Condoms have been in use since the 1850's. Assuming Cal and Rose practiced safe sex there's no reason to believe she should have become pregnant.

Answer: The dialogue implies that they had not had sex yet. Cal tells her "There is nothing I would deny you, if you would not deny me." So it sounds like Cal is trying to convince Rose to have sex prior to their marriage. But Rose does not lose her virginity until she and Jack get busy in the car. However, IF they had been engaging in pre-marital sex, condoms were widely available in 1912, as were diaphragms; and there were other methods that, while maybe not as effective as modern methods, were better than nothing: Withdrawal before ejaculation, and intercourse at infertile times in a woman's cycle (see http://www.plannedparenthood.org/library/birthcontrol/020709_bchistory.html). Also, she could have just been lucky.

J I Cohen

There are implications that Rose and Cal were intimate, such as when Cal says, "I had hoped you would come to me last night," and "You are my wife my practice if not yet by law."

Question: When Cal says to Rose,'I should have kept that drawing it would be worth a lot more in the morning'. What does this mean?

Marko1215

Chosen answer: Cal sarcastically means that he expects Jack Dawson (who drew the picture Cal is referring to) will die when the Titanic sinks. It is a morbid fact that, historically, an artist's body of work becomes more valuable "after" their death, even doubling or tripling in value. Cal is saying Jack's drawing would be worth more once Jack is dead.

raywest Premium member

Question: When Cal decides to bribe Murdoch with money to guarantee a spot on a lifeboat, what was the point of even doing so? Was it just because of the "women and children first" policy? Being in first class would seem to put women, children, AND men at a higher priority.

Answer: Cal would have had to get on after all the women and children (first class second and third) He probably knows the lifeboats would all be full by then so he tries to bribe and get on one before it is too late.

Answer: "Women and children first" means just that, regardless of class. Cal had to make sure he would get a spot instead of some third class passenger.

MasterOfAll

Question: Towards the beginning of the film when Brock and his team are searching for the diamond. They go through what where Rose's, Cal's and Ruth's rooms. They also pass the bathroom and Bodine says "Looks like someone left the water running" My question is how could he tell that? And how could that've happened? When the passengers start going up to the deck Ruth tells the maids to go back and turn up the heaters believing she will return to the room and maids aren't shown again.

Answer: It was a sarcastic remark. The "water left running" flooded the Titanic and caused it to sink. He didn't mean that someone literally left the water running.

shortdanzr Premium member

Question: Where and/or when are we told that Rose has actually died at the end when she returns to the Titanic?

Answer: While its never confirmed she has died, it seems like she died in her sleep after throwing the necklace back into the ocean. After we see her in bed, she is on the Titanic and everyone who died is standing around implying she is now seeing all these people again now that she has died. This could also just be a dream.

Lummie Premium member

Question: Why does Rose get Jack to draw her if she is only going to give it to Cal to make him angry?

Answer: You answered your own question. That is her only reason. She is showing Cal all that he will never get and that, obviously, someone else (of a lower class!) will.

Sereenie

Chosen answer: Even though Rose repeatedly spurned Cal's affections in favor of Jack, Cal still maintained feelings of love and devotion for her. Cal did, with Jack's help, encourage Rose into a lifeboat in order that she might be saved. In the process, he told her that he had an arrangement with a ship's officer for another boat in another part of the ship which he and Jack could board. But that was a lie. He never had any intention of helping Jack. Jack had already surmised that Cal was lying, but played along in order to help convince Rose to save herself. Cal revealed the truth to Jack as the boat was being lowered. It seems Cal believed (or hoped) that once Jack was out of the picture, Rose would become the kind of wife he desired. However, after Rose abandons the lifeboat, and returns to the Titanic, Jack runs after her so they can live or die together. At that point, it finally becomes obvious to Cal that he will never have her. In his rage and jealousy, he lays chase, and unsuccessfully attempts to shoot them with his manservant's gun as they disappear into the flooding dining room.

Michael Albert

Answer: I believe the chase was also an ingenious way for Cameron to show flooding in various parts of the luxury areas that had previously been shown in its opulence, a good juxtaposition.

Question: Is is ever explained why Rose kept the Heart of the Ocean all those years? It doesn't seem probable that she assumed she would have the opportunity to travel to the site of the sinking and throw it back into the water.

Kimberly Klaus

Chosen answer: It is explained in the alternate ending. It basically goes something like this: Brock Lovett and Lizzy find Rose on the stern of the ship with the diamond in her hand and asks her why she kept it all those years. Rose then says that she often thought about selling the diamond, but then it reminded her of Cal and that she could make it without his money.

Friso94

Answer: I like to think she kept it because in a strange way, although it was a gift from Cal and a reminder of his possessiveness, it was also her last physical link with Jack, the drawing having gone down with the ship, and whilst nobody but her knew about Jack she needed that reminder that he really existed and really loved her and was gunning for her in life. She likely brought it along to the wreck site opportunistically, since she knew she would never get another chance to return it to there in person. Returning it to the symbolised several things: one, that was where the constricts of her former life and of that era all died, thus freeing her - in other words, it belonged to the same world as the Titanic, and not to the modern world; two, it symbolised that she had found closure with regards to Jack's death, and that she didn't need trinkets anymore to hold onto him in her heart; and three, it was a physical symbolisation of her letting go of a huge emotional millstone that had been on her shoulders for years, as you can see from her face and demeanour immediately after having dropped it in. She couldn't have let that load go if she hadn't finally had a chance and an ear to tell her story. Probably nobody ever realised she'd been on the Titanic after the disaster, as her post-sinking name was never associated with it.

Question: Were Jack and Rose actually married? Because I saw the end and it had a clip of them in front of the Grand Staircase probably getting married.

Peace_Monkey2000

Chosen answer: No. The clip of them at the end of the grand staircase was meant to symbolise Jack and Rose being back together again now that Rose was dead. He was her one true love, and yearned to be back with him.

GalahadFairlight

Question: When Jack is drawing the portrait of Rose, she mentions Monet wouldn't blush after catching Jack blushing. He replies with "he only does landscapes." What does this mean? Is it a joke because I can recall them chuckling. If it is a joke, what was he inferring?

Answer: They laugh due to Jack pointing out that Monet, if he did not paint landscapes, most likely would blush if he was the one seeing Rose nude.

Question: What did Jack mean when he said "You wouldn't have jumped" after he told Rose that he could see her?

Answer: He means that she never intended to actually jump off from the balcony. He knew she was just acting in a desperate manner because she was so unhappy, but that she did not actually want to kill herself.

raywest Premium member

Question: When Jack goes to the first class to have dinner, and Ruth and Cal are asking him questions about being in third class and being poor in general, what are they hoping to achieve from embarrassing him in front of all the people at their table? Even Molly doesn't seem too pleased with their line of questioning.

Heather Benton Premium member

Chosen answer: Molly is only recently wealthy, that's why she's not amused. Ruth and Cal are bad people, basically. They take pleasure from from humiliating Jack.

Phixius Premium member

Question: When Cal goes down to where the Steerage passengers from the Titanic are, on the Carpathia, is he looking for Rose? And if he is, then 1) how does he know she is alive?, and 2) why would he care if she was, considering he got angry because she chose Jack over him, and had attempted to kill them whilst still on the Titanic?

Answer: Cal was looking for Rose simply to recover his precious Heart of the Ocean.

Answer: He was going down there on the off-chance that she was alive, and probably looking in steerage in particular, because he was anticipating that if she had survived alongside Jack, then they would, together, have boarded the Carpathia as steerage passengers. And that if Jack were in fact dead, he might be able to 'reclaim' her.

Answer: Cal was looking among the steerage survivors to see if Rose was among those who'd been rescued. If she was alive, he assumed (correctly) that she'd probably be there rather than with the first class passengers. Cal, despicable as he was, really did love Rose, and he'd still have wanted to marry her. He did not attempt to kill her while still on the Titanic. In the heat of the moment, he was aiming only for Jack, wanting to permanently eliminate his rival and reclaim his fiance.

raywest Premium member

Answer: He was hoping that she might still be alive because, as said in a commentary, he still had feelings for her. Because of this, maybe he was taking a chance on either them or just apologizing for his actions; you can be the judge.

Answer: Based on accounts from 5th Office Harold Lowe (played by Ioan Gruffudd), he waited approximately 20 minutes after the sinking to begin the process of freeing up a lifeboat to look for survivors. His whole operation took about 45 minutes. Jack and Rose would have been in the water for probably close to an hour.

Question: In the scene with the little boy in the flooding hallway, what language are he and his dad speaking?

Answer: According to the script, it's Russian.

Sierra1 Premium member

Answer: It's either Czech or Slovak.

Answer: He is speaking in Czech.

Question: When Jack wins the poker game and the Titanic tickets in the bar at the start of the movie, one of the other players grabs him and says something in his own language before making as if to punch him. Does anyone know what he actually says?

Answer: The man is from Sweden, and he said "Förbannade usling." In English, it is "You damn scoundrel."

chrissepia

Question: Jack sings "come Josephine to my flying machine, going up she goes, up she goes..." to Rose. Was this an actual song or did they just make it up to go in the film?

Answer: It's an actual song written by Alfred Bryan and Fred Fisher in 1910. http://www.geocities.com/dferg5493/comejosephineinmyflyingmachine.htm

ChiChi

Question: Where any charges ever brought up against the White Star line after so many people died?

Answer: From Wikipedia: In the United States and Britain, more than 60 survivors combined to sue the White Star Line for damages connected to loss of life and baggage. The claims totalled $16,804,112 (appr. $419 million in 2018 USD), which was far in excess of what White Star argued it was responsible for as a Limited liability company under American law. Because the bulk of the litigants were in the United States, White Star petitioned the United States Supreme Court in 1914, which ruled in it's favour that it qualified as an LLC and found that the causes of the ship's sinking were largely unforeseeable, rather than due to negligence. This sharply limited the scope of damages survivors and family members were entitled to, prompting them to reduce their claims to some $2.5 million. White Star only settled for $664,000 (appr. $16.56 million in 2018), about 27% of the original total sought by survivors. The settlement was agreed to by 44 of the claimants in December 1915, with $500,000 set aside for the American claimants, $50,000 for the British, and $114,000 to go towards interest and legal expenses.

lionhead

Factual error: Rose mentions Austrian psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud's ideas on the male preoccupation with size to Bruce. However this is 1912, and Freud did not publish the work relating to this until 1920 in "Beyond The Pleasure Principle." Also, up until 1919, Freud relied solely on data from women. (00:33:40)

David Mercier

More mistakes in Titanic

Jack: That's one of the good things about Paris: lots of girls willing to take their clothes off.

More quotes from Titanic

Trivia: Gloria Stuart (old Rose) and Kate Winslet (young Rose) were the first two actresses to be Oscar nominated for playing the same character in the same movie. Kate Winslet did it again in 2001, when she was nominated Best Supporting Actress for Iris - she played young Iris Murdoch, while Judi Dench played old Iris.

baccgirl

More trivia for Titanic

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