Titanic

Answer: Per the dialogue, Rose is 17 (and about to turn 101 in the present). Jack's age is never stated.

JC Fernandez

Answer: Jack's age is not mentioned in the film, but in other contexts James Cameron has described the character as being 20 years old.

Question: Why were many of the lifeboats intentionally lowered down to the water without being filled to capacity?

Matty Blast

Chosen answer: This is what really happened - it was at first feared that the davits used to lower the boats would buckle under the weight, or that the boats themselves would break in the middle, and so many of the ones lowered first were not filled to capacity - one of them, with space for forty, had just twelve people on board. Later, as it was realised that there was not nearly enough life-boat space for all the passengers and crew, boats were filled to capacity, or even over-filled (one boat carried seventy).

STP Premium member

Chosen answer: Accoding to IMDB.com, Winslet was paid $2,000,000, and DiCaprio's salary was $2,500,000.

raywest Premium member

Chosen answer: According to IMDb there were over a 1000 extras. I don't think you will find an exact number anywhere.

Mortug

Question: I don't know if this can be answered, but does Rose die at the end? And why does she throw the necklace into the ocean at the end of the movie? I have a feeling it was left unclear so everyone has different interpretations of the movie, but I was hoping someone may have information to give a definite answer to these 2 questions.

Answer: Rose does die at the end. She dies above the wreck of the Titanic and returns to the ship (metaphorically) with all those who perished on. I think she throws the necklace into the ocean because people should be interested in what happened and feel sorry for those who died rather than to look for treasures (my interpretation).

Kara

My interpretation is that she threw the diamond into the ocean giving her heart and the heart of the ocean back to Jack or the Titanic.

Answer: The ending is left ambiguous. After lying down in the bed she either, a) has one more dream of Jack or b) has died in her sleep and is now reunited with Jack.

Answer: According to director James Cameron, what happened to Old Rose is ambiguous so that people watching the movie can decide for themselves if she is still alive and having one more dream about Jack or if she had finally died and is now reunited with Jack. According to the actual screenplay, "We PAN OFF the last picture to Rose herself, warm in her bunk. A profile shot. She is very still. She could be sleeping, or maybe something else."

Answer: My interpretation is that Rose dies. Prior to Jack's passing, he makes her promise that she will never let go of the will to live. He tells her how she will go on to have a few babies, live a life full of adventure, and die in a warm bed at a very old age. He makes her promise that she will never let go of the will to live no matter how hopeless a situation may seem. After telling her story of Jack, we see her in a warm bed surrounded by photos of her life. The photos are of her family, a glamour shot from her time as an actress, a photo of her by an airplane, and lastly, one of her on a horse, at the beach, by the Santa Monica Pier. As she has fulfilled her promise to Jack, while also returning the diamond [as Mr. Lovett now sees the real value is that of life and no longer has any interest in it], she passes away in her sleep. The final scene shows her back on Titanic, which may also represent her afterlife, marrying Jack as only the people who perished in the sinking are featured.

Invader_Gir

Question: What is so interesting about the number of times that Jack and Rose's names were said in the movie? Is there some meaning behind the numbers?

Answer: There's absolutely nothing interesting about it. Probably the only reason that this information appears anywhere is that they do say the names rather a lot - somebody, for reasons unknown, decided to count them.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: When Lovejoy says to Jack, 'It's interesting. The young lady slipped so suddenly and you had time to remove your jacket and your shoes.', what exactly is he getting at? That he's figured out Rose attempted suicide, or he's accusing Jack of attempted rape?

Answer: The story Rose and Jack came up with was Rose was looking at the propellers and suddenly slipped and Jack rescued her. Seeing that Jack had his shoes untied and jacket off means he had more time then he lets on, making Lovejoy suspicious of Jack and what really went on.

Lummie Premium member

Question: Before dinner, when Rose is telling Jack the name of people who are gathered downstairs, she points out a man who has a wife who is Rose's age, and says that his wife is in "delicate condition", that she's trying to hide it, and it's "quite the scandal." If the couple is married, why does the woman want to hide her pregnancy?

Answer: At this time, and particularly in higher society, most personal matters concerning women, and particularly a pregnancy, was considered something extremely private. This would be never be discussed openly with strangers. The man in question is John Jacob Astor IV, and the woman is his second wife, Madeleine, who was 29 years his junior, hence the possible source of the "scandal."

raywest Premium member

Madeleine actually survived the disaster and went on to have the child.

Ssiscool Premium member

Answer: At the time, it was a big scandal surrounding John Jacob Astor's divorce then marriage to Madeline, even his grown sons were in opposition. It wasn't until after the sinking that the sons met with her in support.

Question: Why was Cal laughing about the fact that he had put the diamond in the coat, and the coat on Rose?

Answer: It's just a reaction to the irony of the situation. He's laughing at his own stupidity for not remembering that the diamond was in the pocket when he put the coat on Rose (though he expected they'd still be together).

raywest Premium member

Question: Why does Rose say "artists need good light don't they?" when they enter her stateroom, even though she hasn't actually asked Jack to draw her yet?

Answer: She probably had already asked him (he had all of his material with him after all); she just hadn't yet specified *how* she wanted to be drawn.

Sereenie

Question: Does anyone know the name of the hymn played by the 4 string players at the end of the film, just before they say, "It's been a pleasure playing with you all tonight"?

Question: Bit of a stupid question, but was just wondering. When Mr Andrews is talking to Rose, Cal and Ruth during the tour of the ship, Rose says that there are not enough boats for everyone on board, and Mr Andrews explains that he wanted more boats or something, and he was told that they would make the deck too cluttered so he was overruled, and the ship got the boats it does. But as Mr Andrews designed/ constructed the ship, surely it's up to him how many lifeboats there are etc, so why did he back down?

Heather Benton Premium member

Chosen answer: It certainly was not up to him. Andrews was only the designer and an employee of the company, White Star Line. Whatever he may have wanted or recommended, the company had the power and the legal right to overrule him in favor of what they felt made the ship more profitable. They did not want their high-paying clientele's ocean view obstructed by too many lifeboats. Safety regulations were far more lax at this time, though many new ones were enacted following the tragedy, including more lifeboats.

raywest Premium member

Answer: Regulations at the time required ships over 10,000 tons to have 16 lifeboats on board, Titanic which was 40,000 tons had 20 so four more than required. In the 2 1/2 hours it took Titanic to sink they managed to get 18 of 20 boats off safely, collapsibles A and B were floated off and one was even capsized. It's quite possible that if Titanic had more lifeboats more lives would've been lost due to having to work around the extra boats they possibly would've got less boats away.

Question: In the middle of the film Mr. Lovett tells Rose that "the ship will sink, don't tell anyone to cause any panic and go to a boat, quickly!" After that he says "you remember what I told you?" which Rose replies "yes, I understand". What was this about?

Loesjuh1985

Chosen answer: When this happens, Rose is talking to Mr. Andrews and he is referencing a conversation they had while walking on the deck of Titanic (when Rose wears the blue dress). He said that there weren't enough lifeboats for half the people aboard because the deck would look too cluttered.

CuriousKid1

Question: I've seen this movie about 10 times now but I always wondered the next thing. After the Titanic hits the iceberg, they knew the ship would sink. Couldn't they go back to the iceberg and survive there and wait for help? Surely there would be more places, and it would be warmer on the iceberg than in the water?

Loesjuh1985

Chosen answer: Trying to turn the Titanic and return to the iceberg would just have put additional strain on the ship's structure, likely hastening its sinking. So the only available option, short of swimming, which is obviously insane, would be to use the ship's lifeboats to ferry passengers over to the iceberg, which, given the lack of capacity, would have taken multiple trips and a considerable amount of time. Once they reached the iceberg, there would be no way to tie the boats securely to the iceberg to allow the passengers to cross over safely; icebergs usually have pretty sheer sides anyway, making boarding impossible without specialist equipment that they didn't have. Even assuming, for the sake of argument, that somehow this could be done, the passengers are now sitting on a large block of ice in the middle of the night, in, for the most part, inadequate clothing. Hypothermia would rapidly set in, leading to death within at most a couple of hours, before any help reached the scene.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: If Rose is recalling her story on the Titanic to everyone, it's one thing where the scenes involving Rose herself or anything she witnessed could be retold... but how is it all the rest of the scenes (not involving Rose) be shown accurately in her story when she was not there (other passengers, crewmen conversations, etc.)?

Answer: Of course, Rose couldn't possibly relate incidents and conversations that she didn't personally witness. Rose's story merely serves as a dramatic conduit by which the audience is transported back in time to experience the last days of the Titanic.

Charles Austin Miller

Answer: While we can accept that the scenes involving Rose are accurate (or as accurate as can be after 85 years) the rest is just shown to be for entertainment purposes.

Ssiscool Premium member

While parts are fictionalized, much of what was depicted in the movie was based on the recorded narratives of the Titanic survivors, both crew and passengers.

raywest Premium member

And some of what was fictionalized was done so in bad taste. Mr. Murdoch's passing is one such example. To the point James Cameron made a donation to the foundation set up by Murdoch's family.

Ssiscool Premium member

Question: I have watched this movie many times but still do not know the logical thinking behind it. If all this time Rose kept "Heart of the Ocean", then why did she ask Brock Lovett in the beginning of the movie by saying "I was just wondering if you had found The Heart of the Ocean yet, Mr. Lovett?"

Hilman Sadakir

Chosen answer: The primary reason for the question is to prove to Brock that she is, in fact, Rose DeWitt Bukater. The insurance claim for the Heart of the Ocean diamond was paid under strict secrecy. As such, few people, including Rose, would even know of its existence. Another underlying reason might be as a private taunt. Rose sees Brock Lovett for who he is - an opportunist plundering the Titanic for riches. I imagine she finds him somewhat distasteful, so she amuses herself by asking a question to which (we all later discover) she knows the answer.

Michael Albert

Question: Is there a way to tell what Jack had in his hand to make a full house during the poker game to win the Titanic tickets?

Answer: According to pokerlistings.com Jack is shown to be holding tens and aces, though the exact number of each cannot be seen.

raywest Premium member

Question: Just before Rose finds Mr. Andrews to ask him how to find Jack, who is under arrest, we see Andrews telling a woman to put on her life jacket and go up to the boats. As he is walking away we see that she goes back in her room. By the look on her face, it didn't really seem like she was going to obey. Assuming she didn't believe him, in general could there really be situations of people who were in shock of the situation and for whatever reason didn't get on a lifeboat, such as the example shown in a deleted scene showing the deaths of Jack's friend Cora and her parents who get trapped behind a locked gate (and the man who Rose tries to get to help her free Jack, but he keeps running down the hallway) as the ship is already close to breaking apart. Would they have really waited that long to go up to the deck on purpose? Because obviously they were all alone and the crew members locked the gate without knowing they were still in their room.

Answer: It was common back then to keep the three classes separated. Most didn't stay down below on purpose. They stayed because they had no choice. The procedure originally would have been to lower the lifeboats according to class. However, with Titanics situation, there wasn't enough boats and there wasn't enough time to carry out a full evacuation procedure in an orderly fashion.

Answer: The primary reason there were so many casualties with the sinking of the Titanic was due to the arrogance of those involved with building and sailing the ship and not having enough lifeboats for such a catastrophe -- they really and truly believed the ship could not be sunk. Many of the passengers felt the same way and failed to see the severity of the disaster until it was too late.

MovieFan612 Premium member

Question: Someone else submitted a question about a falling cow being put in one scene, and they were told that someone was probably just joking with them. I've also heard that rumor, before ever finding this site, so I'm wondering if anyone else knows whether a cow was really put in the background of any scene.

Answer: No. It is not true. There is an urban myth surrounding a falling cow sinking a Japanese trawler, but is complete non-sense. I think you have been misinformed by someone getting the stories mixed up. Check out http://www.snopes.com/critters/farce/cowtao.asp. for more info about the falling cow.

bacupboy

Answer: In one of the sinking scenes you see a person falling from the ship into the water in the foreground. It happens very quickly and right in front of the camera but it's definitely a person.

Question: Just a quick one: Why the hell didn't Rose just move over on her door to give Jack some room? And why didn't Jack take the piece of wood from the frozen guy with the whistle after he had died?

Answer: In an episode of Myth Busters, they checked to see if Jack could've actually fit on the board and survived. Their first result stated the the movie was correct; there was not enough buoyancy to keep them both afloat. After some thinking they decided to tie Rose's life jacket under the board to increase the amount of buoyancy, and sure enough the board did float, but it's not unreasonable that that wouldn't have occurred to Jack and Rose. When they consulted James Cameron about the results he simply stated, "I think you guys are missing the point here. The script says Jack died. He has to die. So maybe we screwed up and the board should have been a little tiny bit smaller, but the dude's goin' down."

Answer: Insider did an interesting article on this debate. The "door" Rose was floating on was actually a carved piece of wood paneling that hung about the first-class lounge. The evidence for this resides on display at the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic in Nova Scotia where an original panel of the ship served as the inspiration for the design of the wood seen in the movie. This is important because those panels were only made from teak, pine, and oak. Physics Central calculated the possibility of survival for all three based on buoyancy. They estimated teak would have been too heavy and would have sunk under its own weight. Pine may have supported their weight, but was ruled out when the panel flipped when Jack tried to grab it. The oak paneling seen was only strong [and large] enough to contain Rose as the weight of both Rose and Jack would have outweighed its buoyancy.

Invader_Gir

Titanic mistake picture

Continuity mistake: When Jack and Rose are going down with the ship, there is a man holding onto the flagpole. The man's life jacket disappears and reappears. (02:42:42)

More mistakes in Titanic

Jack: That's one of the good things about Paris: lots of girls willing to take their clothes off.

More quotes from Titanic

Trivia: James Cameron drew the picture of Rose himself, and it was sold at auction in 2011 for $16,000. (01:24:05)

MovieFan612 Premium member

More trivia for Titanic

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