Titanic

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A masterpiece. One of, if not the greatest film ever made. Bringing together history, romance, drama and suspense this film is an iconic film for all generations that pulls at the heartstrings of all that watch it.

I write this on the 106th Anniversary of the ship striking the iceberg and you really get a feel for how good the acting in this film is. It really draws you in and makes you feel for the passengers on the ship. Heartbreaking scenes where we see young children, elderly couple and even baby's dying. The film tackles these scenes with the respect deserved. Easy to see why it won 11 Academy awards.

From the start we see a rich woman learn that life is about more than money and reputation as she learns what true love is when meeting a third class, fly by the wind down to earth guy who wins a ticket in a game of poker.

Ssiscool Premium member

The famous absurd ending where jack dies because he can't get on top of rose, really ruins the whole film! I love the movie until the terrible, silly ending.

Gawdsmakkkk

Factual error: The lake that Jack told Rose he went ice fishing on when she was threatening to jump is Lake Wissota, a man-made lake in Wisconsin near Chippewa Falls (where Jack grew up). The lake was only filled with water in 1918 when a power company built a dam on the Chippewa River, six years after the Titanic sank. (00:39:05)

More mistakes in Titanic

Jack: That's one of the good things about Paris: lots of girls willing to take their clothes off.

More quotes from Titanic

Trivia: James Cameron drew the picture of Rose himself, and it was sold at auction in 2011 for $16,000. (01:24:05)

MovieFan612 Premium member

More trivia for Titanic

Question: Why were the women and children ordered to the lifeboats first and then the men? Why not just let anybody who could make it to the lifeboats get on?

Answer: Though not a requirement of maritime law, it was a matter of historical codes of chivalry that, in life threatening situations where limited numbers of life-saving resources were available, the lives of women and children were to be saved first. That was captain Smith's order the night the RMS Titanic sank. Some of the crew interpreted this to mean "women and children only." Thus, several of the lifeboats were launched only partially full, as men were prevented from occupying empty seats even when all nearby women and children had been boarded. The rescue efforts on the Titanic were further hampered by the fact that, initially, many of the passengers thought that the launching of lifeboats was unnecessary precaution, as the Titanic was thought unsinkable. The night air was cold. The lifeboats seemed uncomfortable. Thus, many preferred to stay on board the ship until reality of the magnitude of the situation became more evident and panic began to set in. Many of the men who survived in lifeboats, like White Star Line chairman Bruce Ismay, were branded cowards upon return to shore, even though many of them occupied seats that would have otherwise gone unused.

Michael Albert

Answer: Furthermore, the "Code of Conduct" would put many boats in the water without anybody being able to row them.

More questions & answers from Titanic

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