Star Wars

Question: How was it possible for Vader to survive when his ship was dashed out into space from the Death Star before it was destroyed? When the TIE fighter crosses Millennium Falcon Obi-Van says "A fighter that size couldn't get this deep into space on its own" and "It would be as well to let it go, it's too far out of range" and Vader's ship is about the same size. Could we assume his ship was some sort of special long-range fighter, or that he was lucky enough to reach an imperial base or catch up with a convoy?

killin_kellit

Chosen answer: Vader's ship was a prototype of the TIE-Advanced, an enhanced model that ultimately proved too expensive to be mass-produced. Part of the reason for that expense was that the fighter was equipped with a hyperdrive, allowing Vader to reach safety with little trouble.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: After the sand-people knock Luke to the ground and later scatter. Obi Wan reaches Luke's arm for a pulse and then touches Luke's forehead. Could this be taken that Luke was dead and Obi Wan returned him to the living?

Answer: I doubt it. It's a common thing to do when facing someone with an injury; check for a pulse, and place a hand on the forehead. I don't know why, it just seems to be a common thing to do (at least, for people who aren't fully trained that is). I personally think that he's either sensing his force power, or he's just overcome with compassion, either for Luke (remember, Luke is the whole reason he's been on that planet for 20-odd years), or perhaps remembering happier times with Anakin (maybe he sees or "feels" a resemblance between them). It can be interpreted as a sign of compassion, anyway.

Gary O'Reilly

I always assumed he was just using The Force to heal whatever injury Luke might have had (concussion, et.al).

Question: What exactly is or was the "Shadows of the Empire?

Answer: "Shadows of the Empire" is essentially Episode 5.5: the story of what happened between "The Empire Strikes Back" and "Return of the Jedi". It was a multimedia project created by Lucasfilm in 1996, with a novel, comic series, computer game, RPG sourcebooks, toys and even its own soundtrack - everything except an actual movie.

Sierra1 Premium member

Question: How old is Luke meant to be in this film, and the other two?

Answer: In A New Hope he is 19, in Empire he is 22, and in Jedi, he is 23. (answers courtesy of http://timeline.echostation.com/timeline).

Mister Ed

Question: Five ships survive the destruction of the Death Star: Vader in his custom TIE, Han and Chewie in the Millennium Falcon, Luke and Wedge in their X-Wings, and a Y-Wing. Who's in the Y-Wing?

Phoenix

Chosen answer: The "X-Wing" computer game implies that the pilot of the surviving Y-Wing is the game's lead character, Keyan Farlander.

Sierra1 Premium member

Question: How is it that Princess Leia, in the hologram, knows who Obi-Wan is? And yet Luke doesn't. How could she possibly know who he is when, in Episode III, the only time she "sees" Obi-Wan is when she is an infant.

Answer: She's never met him, but has been told about him by her adoptive father, Bail Organa, who gave her the mission to go and collect Obi-Wan.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: Is there a difference in the opening scroll between the original release and later versions? I'm specifically wondering if "Episode IV: A New Hope" was included in the original theatrical release, or added later.

Answer: In 1977, the original release just said "Star Wars". Lucas didn't want to confuse everybody. However, one year later, when re-released because of its popularity, he had renamed it "Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope".

SexyIrishLeprechaun

Question: Maybe this will be explained in Episode III, but Leia is "princess" of what? The Rebellion? Of Alderaan? And who is her (fake) father that she mentions to Obi-Wan?

Answer: Leia was adopted by Bail Organa (played by Jimmy Smits in Episodes II and III), who was a member of a Royal family on Alderaan, so when she was adopted by Bail, she became a royal princess.

Cubs Fan

Question: One of the corrections says that there is a scene where Obi-Wan talks about duck with Luke. Where is this scene? I can't seem to find it.

Answer: There's no version of the film that this appears in, and I've checked the original, the special edition and the DVD release. I believe that it was in the original novelisation, but that the scene was either cut before release, or the author simply added it to flesh things out. In any event, it shouldn't be considered a canonical scene, so the correction in question should probably be considered invalid.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: Did they change the CG Jabba the Hutt's appearance? It looked like he was a lot more green than in the original special edition. If they did, then why? I thought he looked fine in the original.

Answer: Yes, they have altered Jabba a bit - after he appeared in Episode I, they tweaked the model used in the special edition to bring it closer to what we've seen elsewhere.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: Han Solo is famous for his Kessel Run, but can anyone explain to me what it is?

Answer: Near the planet of Kessel (the prison planet), there is a cluster of black holes (called the Maw). Smugglers will skirt by the black holes as an escape route, this route is called the Kessel Run. For further details (including an explination of parsecs), view this page: http://www.starwars.com/community/askjc/jocasta/askjc20020221.html.

Bruce Minnick

Question: Why does Obi-Wan freely admit he is a Jedi, when he is supposedly in hiding from Vader? He sure made no secret of his last name.

Answer: It's a very large galaxy - Vader's hardly going to track down some old hermit living out in the middle of nowhere on a backwards planet based purely on a surname that, for all we know, might be quite a common one, and remember that nobody knows him as 'Obi-wan', only as Ben. The only person that he admits to being a Jedi to is Luke, who's not going to go running to the Empire to turn in a man who was a friend of his fathers. Everyone else seems to regard him as a crazy old hermit, not a Jedi Knight or anything like that. Okay, he cuts loose with his sabre in the Mos Eisley cantina, but (a) he's about to leave the planet anyway and (b) it's not as if he had a lot of choice. By the time that Vader might hear about it, he'll be long gone.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: It's obviously simple to build a robot that can understand and speak English. Even droids working as short order cooks can speak English, as far back as Episode 2. So why can't R2 talk? He's a friggin' mechanic, he needs to be able to speak with the humans he works for. I know his primary function isn't communication but if 90% of the droids in Star Wars have a speech function surely R2 could have one.

Answer: R2's job is astromech droid and in-flight mechanic, which means that he's supposed to be locked into a fighter most of the time. When that is the case, he can communicate with the pilot through the computer (as seen in Empire Strikes Back, I believe). Since the builders didn't anticipate how much wandering around he would be doing, they didn't see a need to build in a speech function and instead spent that space on extra tools and repair programming. How many astromechs do you see wandering around the Star Wars universe and interacting with people?

Phoenix

Question: Obi-Wan can obviously understand Wookies, since he books passage on the Falcon through Chewie. So why does he never talk to Chewbacca again? It's like they forgot Ben can understand him.

Answer: Just because we don't see him talk to Chewbacca, it doesn't mean that he doesn't off-camera during the trip. The conversations that he has are with either Luke or Han - he could talk to Chewie but, from the storytelling point of view, it would just be extraneous material.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: After escaping in the pod, Threepio says, "That's funny; the damage doesn't look as bad out here." But they're too far away to see the ship they were in; all they can see is the Imperial Star Destroyer that "swallowed" their ship up. Was this a humorous character-mistake by Lucas to show how erroneous Threepio can often be? Or could Threepio actually see the small ship the rebels were in (hardly looks possible, given the shot shown when he says it)?

Matty Blast

Chosen answer: Well, he is an android, and I doubt the designers would be satisfied at giving him just normal human vision. He probably has some sort of optical enhancements, which would be pretty necessary for any sort of technical work, and he does say that he's done that in the past.

RJR99SS

Question: Do the clones in AOTC and the storm troopers in the last 3 have anything to do with each other? The armor is little different between the two, and the stormtroopers are definitely more clumsy, but it's something I've wondered about... I know that by the time episode IV comes around, the clones are probably very old, considering the age progression, but I wonder if the empire still has them made. Maybe to be seen in episode III...

Answer: They are, to all intents and purposes, the same army, just with a twenty-odd year gap. The clones form the Republic Army - as it's now reasonably clear that the Republic becomes the Empire, the stormtroopers that we see in the original films are therefore the same army, just under a slightly different regime. The armour variation seems like a plausible alteration over the time period. The stormtroopers are, however, not clones (not as a rule, anyway) - they're conventionally recruited and trained soldiers, which probably accounts for their lesser effectiveness. But, yeah, to sum up, they're the same army, just twenty-odd years apart.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: Can anyone explain why Obi-Wan holds up his lightsaber and allows Vader to kill him. Is it something to do with why he comes back as a 'ghost', and so he can help Luke?

Answer: Obi-Wan sacrificed himself because he knew he wouldn't make it back to the Falcon. Vader and the Stormtroopers would have seen to that and the disabling of the Tractor Beam would have been discovered at any time. He also knew Luke would never leave without him, so he prepared himself for death, which why he and Yoda disappeared.

Answer: It does seem to be something along those lines, yes. There's obviously some reason why Obi-wan and Yoda simply vanished at the point of death, while none of the Jedi portrayed in the prequel trilogy films have apparently done so - this will hopefully be explained in the remaining film. A theory put forward in the books is that a Jedi at the point of death can choose to attach himself to another nearby Force sensitive, providing them with some of their strength and, as we see, guidance. If this does turn out to be correct, then it seems that Obi-wan realised that he himself would be unable to defeat Vader, but that Luke might be able to. As such, he chose to sacrifice himself to give Luke an extra edge in his adventures ahead.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: I have the special edition widescreen on video, and still I have never spotted the stormtrooper who runs into a wall on the Death Star. This is supposed to be some kind of classic mistake, still I can't see it no matter how hard I try. Has it been deleted for the special edition? (Some claim that it hasn't, but I can't find it).

Answer: It was never taken out, but it can be hard to spot: the stormtrooper actually runs into the door of the control room where C-3P0 and R2-D2 are hiding. When they charge into the room, keep your eye on the door at all times; just before the camera starts to follow them to the left, you'll see the last one in bang his head.

Xofer

Question: About 20 minutes from the end of Return of the Jedi, Carrie Fischer gets shot by one of the Storm Troopers. Is it just me, or when she falls, does Harrison Ford grab her boob?

Answer: Yes, it certainly seems that way. Tradition holds that Princess Leia's wince of pain at that point is actually Carrie Fisher's wince at Harrison Ford ruining the shot, or so she thought.

DavidK93

Question: Luke says to Uncle Owen and Aunt Beru, "If these new droids do work out, I want to submit my application to the Academy this year." What "Academy" is he referring to? Is it connected with the Empire or the Rebel alliance?

Matty Blast

Chosen answer: Its the Imperial Naval Academy. Many of the Star Wars heros (Han Solo, Biggs Darklighter etc) all went to the academy then defected to the rebellion. Luke wants to get away from Tatoine and has his heart set on adventure like his friend Biggs.

roboc
Star Wars mistake picture Video

Other mistake: When the stormtroopers break into the control room, the stormtrooper on the right of the screen hits his head on the door frame. On the DVD release they've added a thump when he hits it. (01:18:55)

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Darth Vader: I find your lack of faith disturbing.

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Trivia: On its initial release, the film was booked in just 37 theaters. It ended up breaking 36 house records.

Cubs Fan
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