The Man From U.N.C.L.E.

The Man From U.N.C.L.E. (1964)

1 plot hole in The Off Broadway Affair

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The Off Broadway Affair - S3-E10

Plot hole: U.N.C.L.E.'s pen communicators worked much like modern cell phones: when one agent called another, they "rang" with a 2-tone signal. For some reason in this episode, Solo's pen, which isn't on an open circuit, transmits Illya's voice without ringing first. It signals normally a few scenes later, though.

xx:xx:xx

Jean G

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Quotes

Napoleon Solo: My name is Napoleon Solo. I'm an enforcement agent in Section Two here. That's operations and enforcement.
Illya Kuryakin: I am Illya Kuryakin. I am also an enforcement agent. Like my friend Napoleon, I go and I do whatever I am told to by our chief.
Alexander Waverly: Hmm? Oh, yes. Alexander Waverly. Number One in Section One. In charge of this, our New York headquarters. It's from here that I send these young men on their various missions.

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Mistakes

Solo blows open the ceiling vent of Illya and Marion's cell, and she stands on Illya's shoulders until Solo can reach her and pull her out. This leaves Illya with nothing/no one to stand on, no way to reach the vent and no apparent way out of the cell. But he's out just the same in the next scene, with no explanation as to how.

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Trivia

"The Man From U.N.C.L.E.'s" original working title was "Solo," and its lead character was named for a spy with a minor role in one of Ian Fleming's early Bond novels. U.N.C.L.E. producer Norman Felton had a handshake agreement with Fleming to use the name and to develop "Solo" as a TV spy series. But the Bond film franchise had other ideas, reneged on the agreement on Fleming's behalf, and sued, forcing the title change. Felton prevailed only in retaining the character's name: Napoleon Solo.

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