Star Trek: The Next Generation

Justice - S1-E8

Plot hole: The entire premise of the episode is contradictory; the franchise makes abundantly clear through the so called Prime Directive that the Federation abides to a code (often creating moral dilemmas that may require to stretch the rules) that says that their staff is not supposed to interfere in world that haven't reached warp capabilities, nor involve themselves in their internal matters. In the first half of the episode, Riker and the others just go 'mingle' with the frisky natives without a care in the world, and yet in the second half the Prime Directive itself is referenced explicitly and it is part of the plot.

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Suggested correction: They are just enjoying the hospitality of the planet's inhabitants. They are not interfering in their internal affairs or the development of their species. It's only when Wesley gets into trouble that the Prime Directive comes into play. The entire mission of The Enterprise is to make contact with other planets.

wizard_of_gore

The Royale - S2-E12

Factual error: 30 seconds in Geordi says: 'surface temperature -291 degrees Celsius'. (The scale only goes down to -273.15 which is absolute zero). (00:00:30)

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Relics - S6-E4

Scotty: [to Holodeck Computer] The Enterprise. Show me the bridge of the Enterprise, ya chatterin' piece o'...
Computer: There have been five Federation vessels with that name. Please state by registry number.
Scotty: [slowly] N, C, C, 1, 7, 0, 1. No bloody A, B, C, or D.

Movie Nut

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Trivia: Another joke from the set designers: whenever someone is in the Jeffries Tubes, you will see several pipes on the walls labeled "GNDN" this stands for "Goes Nowhere, Does Nothing."

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Answer: He brought the Borg to the Alpha Quadrant and showed them that it was full of worlds waiting to be assimilated. Guinan's homeworld was their first stop, and they assimilated everyone and took over the planet, leaving The Survivors of her race without a home. Q is ultimately responsible for that.

Captain Defenestrator

By the time Q takes the Enterprise to meet the Borg, Guinan already knew who they were and they had already destroyed her world. Therefore the above answer can not be right. I believe Guinan is much more than she appears, and her people have had encounters with the Q in the past. It is these interactions, that obviously were not pleasant, that fuels her distrust.

oldbaldyone

That's what the above answer is saying. Q brought the Borg to the Alpha Quadrant (not Earth) and the Borg destroyed Guinan's home world in the late 2200's, which is why she hates Q. Although she met Q in 2160 and they both saw each other as enemies right away.

Bishop73

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