The Wolverine

Question: Mariko said to Yukio that she could not tell her something now, on the night Yashida faked his death - what could she not tell her?


Question: Why did Mariko's father hit her the night Yashida faked his death?


Answer: Shingen is angry that his father left the company to Mariko instead of himself. He believes Mariko somehow manipulated her grandfather and is unworthy of the honor.


Question: Yukio said that it was always difficult for Mariko to make friends, but why?


Answer: It isn't really explained, however Mariko is distant and depressed. Presumably she has always been so.


Question: Why does Wolverine tell Ginsen that he tried to kill his daughter? I thought only her fiancé called the Yakuza to kill her (unbeknownst to her father).


Chosen answer: Shingen and Mori conspired to have Mariko killed. Shingen felt slighted by his father for leaving the company to his granddaughter and not his son.


Question: The scene with the bear, the hunter in the bar, and the poisoned arrows was taken from a particular comic book. Anyone know which one?


Chosen answer: It was the first issue of the Wolverine comic, the 1982 limited series by Chris Claremont and Frank Miller.


Question: Was Logan's healing factor completely removed by Viper or just slowed down a lot? In the funeral fight scenes and on the train he was shot and stabbed multiple times, yet he was only slowed down. It seems if the healing factor was at 0% he would have bled to death right after. (Especially after a shotgun blast to the abdomen at point blank range) And is the healing factor back at 100% now even after the grandfather sucked a bunch of it out?

Chosen answer: The healing factor was only reduced. Like you said, had it been removed he would have bled to death and every time he used his claws he would be bleeding from his hands. It is not revealed if it is at full strength at the end of the film, but it is likely it will return to full strength over time.

Question: Approximately what year is the film set? The adamantium would place it after the Origins film (which I believe to be set circa 1979) in which he loses most if not all of his memories. This begs the question, how is it that he remembers WWII and the atomic bomb?

Chosen answer: The chronology of the X-Men film series is, to put it mildly, somewhat screwed up. The first movie was released in 2000 and is described in an on-screen caption as being set in "The not too distant future", which isn't the most helpful statement, could be two years, could be ten years, who knows. The Wolverine is set about two years after the events of X-Men: The Last Stand, which is in turn about a year after the events of the first movie, so think about "the not too distant future", whatever that means, and add about three years onto that. This does mean that, yes, it is indeed set some decades after the events of the Origins movie, during which he lost his memories. It is, however, also set after a period during which he worked with Professor Xavier to regain some of his memories. It could therefore be suggested that Logan remembering his experience at Nagasaki represents that they had at least a partial success in recovering some of his memories.




Join the mailing list