The Lion King
The Lion King mistake picture

Other mistake: During "Can You Feel the Love Tonight?", Simba's reflection in the water isn't very consistent - the rocks he's standing on are closer to the water than they appear in the reflection. (00:58:45)

ryguy_1983
4

Other mistake: On the old Blu-ray cover of The Lion King, there are several mistakes. In the old version, Nala's face was different, as she had brown eyes instead of blue ones and had whiskers. Her head structure was also different and her eyebrows were larger. Rafiki's face is also different as well, his eyes are wide apart from each other and part of his nose is miscolored. While Simba's face is given a few addition in the new Blu-ray cover, Pumbaa had white eyes and Timon's head isn't facing to the front and didn't have dark eyelids. However, all of these mistakes were changed for the new Blu-ray cover.

thezombiewolfgirl
1

Other mistake: When Zazu is alarmed at the pouncing lesson, he loses a couple of feathers that simply vanish in midair. (00:10:45)

Ssiscool Premium member

Audio problem: (May only apply to the original VHS release.) When Scar has Zazu locked up in a cage, Zazu mentions Mufasa's name and Scar yells at him, "What did you say?" Right before Scar's actual line, whilst Zazu is talking, you hear Scar's "What did you say?" line very faintly in the background, even though Zazu has not even mentioned Mufasa yet.

More mistakes in The Lion King

Timon: What do you want me to do, dress in drag and do the hula?

More quotes from The Lion King

Trivia: In the movie Mufasa is voiced by James Earl Jones and the Lion Queen, Sarabi, is voiced by Madge Sinclair. Those same two actors also played the king and queen of Zamunda in the Eddie Murphy comedy "Coming to America".

More trivia for The Lion King

Question: Two part question. 1)Is Hakuna Matata a real phrase from another language, or is it one of Timon's and Pumba's originals? 2)Pumba says at one point of the movie, "They call me Mr. Pig!" Is this a reference to anything?

Answer: (1) It's a real phrase from the Swahili language and, as stated in the film, translates roughly to "no worries" (literally "there are no worries"). (2) The line is a reference to Sidney Poitier's detective character Virgil Tibbs from In The Heat Of The Night and his famous reply of "They call me Mister Tibbs" when asked what they call him back home. The film's sequel, focusing on Poitier's character, actually used the line as the title.

Tailkinker Premium member
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