Goldfinger

Plot hole: Oddjob brings the crushed cube of the Lincoln back to the stud farm so that Goldfinger can "separate my gold from the late Mr Solo." Oddjob could have simply removed the gold from the trunk of the Lincoln before having it crushed.

Plot hole: After Pussy Gallore's airplanes spray "Delta-9" onto Fort Knox and the soldiers fake the effects, why does the army let Goldfinger and his nuclear device so far into Fort Knox? Wouldn't it be much safer to intercept him somewhere at the fence? He would be surrounded by thousand of soldiers either way, but without having the opportunity to plant his nuclear device in the building. The army even awaits the signals that the device is armed.

Goekhan
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Suggested correction: It was only when the atomic bomb was armed that it could be detected. If the trap was sprung too soon, the bomb might bot be captured. It was mentioned in the movie that if the bomb was not captured, it could be used elsewhere in the US. In addition, the bomb was not brought in by ground, but flown in after Fort Knox was captured.

Noman Premium member

Doesn't make sense too. Pussy Gallore was spraying useless "steam" over Fort Knox, she could've taken the bomb for Bond or the government pretty easily then.

Goekhan
1

The bomb was not there for anyone to take. It was necessary to wait until the helicopter brought the bomb to Fort Knox. To do anything before the arrival of the bomb would have meant that the bomb would not be captured.

Noman Premium member

Plot hole: When Bond goes into the kitchen for the champagne, Oddjob is waiting for him. But where was he hiding? Oddjob couldn't have hidden in the bedroom without being seen. The kitchen is separated from the bedroom about halfway by a metal grate and not a wall. Oddjob could have only been hiding in front of the cupboards since we can see Bond from the bedroom POV all the way to the refrigerator. There is no possible way Bond wouldn't have seen him or even brushed against him. There is lighting in the kitchen, which we know because Bond is illuminated when he walks in; he casts a strong shadow on the floor during and after his fall (not from the refrigerator); and is illuminated when he stumbles out. The pan shots of the kitchen show no places where Oddjob could have concealed himself - and he is not exactly on the thin side.

Plot hole: The planes spraying the gas are flying too high and too fast for the gas to be able to have any effect on the soldiers on the ground as quickly as it does. While we later find out that the soldiers were faking the effects, the too-rapid response should have raised the bad guys' suspicions.

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Suggested correction: That assumes the bad guys actually know the effects of the D9 gas. Since they've never used it before how would they know how long it would take to work?

stiiggy

Plot hole: Jill was sprayed with liquid or atomized gold. Yet there is no overspray anywhere, no paint on the bed or sheets, no dripping from Jill's arm to the carpet. Even if the paint was quick-dry, there would have been some paint residue just from Oddjob moving her around to spray her whole body.

Continuity mistake: The first time they show Johnny in the T-bird looking at the radar, you can see from the driver's window an orange 1958 Chevrolet pulling out into traffic. A few seconds later he is talking and you can see the same 1958 Chevrolet driving up to pull out in the street.

demodon
More mistakes in Goldfinger

James Bond: A martini. Shaken, not stirred.

More quotes from Goldfinger

Trivia: In the closing credits, the words "Tosh Togo" appear under Harold Sakata's name. This was Sakata's ring name when he was a professional wrestler from the early 1950s to the early 1960s.

More trivia for Goldfinger

Question: How did Bond know which room Goldfinger had at the hotel?

Answer: Security and guest privacy was less of a concern in this era. Often someone could merely inquire at the desk which room a guest was staying in. Another ploy often used in movies was to leave a note for the guest and then watch which numbered mailbox the concierge placed it in.

raywest Premium member

Answer: He deduced that Goldfinger was using a partner to spy on his opponent's hand, and to check his theory he went to the room with the best line of sight. Alternatively, he went (off-screen) to the desk and used his charm, which was utterly irresistible in the Bond films of the '60s, to find out where Goldfinger was staying.

More questions & answers from Goldfinger

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