Twilight Zone: The Movie

In the final segment, John Lithgow goes over the edge of madness, takes the cop's gun and shoots at a plane window, trying to kill the creature and it runs away. The window breaks, there are pressure complications, panic ensues and the plane must be landed immediately. When the plane lands, the plane crew takes a look at the plane engines and wings and see that the plane is busted up... so there really was something damaging the plane and John Lithgow wasn't imagining things. He is strapped into a straitjacket and taken away in an ambulance. Dan Aykroyd is driving the ambulance and he asks Lithgow: "You wanna see something really scary??"

Ultra Magnus

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Mr. Bloom: I found out, a long, long time ago, that I wanted to be my own true age and try and keep a young mind.

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Trivia: In the opening, the two guys are discussing TV shows including Twilight Zone. They specifically mention the episode with Burgess Meredith when his glasses broke. Meredith was also the narrator during the movie.

William Bergquist

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Question: During the Vietnamese child-rescue scene (in which Vic Morrow and two child actors were horrifically killed in real life), why on earth did they allow Vic Morrow and the children to perform their own stunt work in what was, without question, an incredibly chaotic and deadly-dangerous night-time shoot? With several large pyrotechnics exploding on all sides and helicopters hovering less than 20 feet over the actors' heads, it was a recipe for disaster. Why did the film makers consider it worth the risk to capture a few frames of Vic Morrow's blurry likeness in a wide, distant shot?

Answer: It's unlikely we'll ever fully understand. However, there were already a number of violations involving the children, prior to the stunt. It seems to boil down to the audiences at the time demanding more and more dangerous stunts and actions in their films that the film makers, and Landis, tried to accommodate. Landis also seemed less concerned about the dangers and either didn't think it would be that risky or was more concerned about finishing production on time. For whatever reason, Landis ignored warnings of the dangers. But given that he violated night time production laws involving the children, including hiding the children from welfare workers and telling them to keep everything a secret, shows he was more concerned with getting the shots and must have felt the stunt was that important.

Bishop73

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