Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Kylo Ren kills Supreme Leader Snoke and takes control of the First Order - he asks Rey to join him in destroying the past and moving forwards free from it, and she refuses. Vice Admiral Holdo destroys Ren's ship the Supremacy by jumping to light speed directly through it, sacrificing herself. The Rebels barely make it to the planet below, but, hopelessly outgunned, are forced to retreat, aided by Rey, and the few survivors escape on the Millennium Falcon. Luke buys them time by facing Kylo Ren one on one - we eventually learn he was projecting himself across the galaxy from his home planet. Exhausted, he collapses and fades from existence, becoming one with the force.

Jon Sandys

Continuity mistake: During the throne room fight against the red-armoured guards, one of them splits his weapon into 2 blades. In the shot where he gets Rey into an arm lock, the blade in the guard's left hand vanishes from the scene completely, in the middle of a shot. The hand that held the weapon is obscured by Rey's body at the point when the disappearance happens. It could be that the actor dropped it (a strange thing for an elite fighter to do), but then the blade is nowhere to be seen on the floor in the wider shot when Rey kills him.

James Rice

More mistakes in Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Kylo Ren: Let the past die. Kill it, if you have to. That's the only way to become what you are meant to be.

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Trivia: Finn and Rose's mission on Canto Bight is interrupted by the fact that they parked their ship illegally. This also happens to the heroes in the Star Wars parody film Spaceballs by Mel Brooks that came out in 1987.

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Question: I don't understand why Kylo Ren killed Han in the previous movie, but now says that he didn't hate Han?

Answer: As he says, "let the past die. Kill it, if you have to." Han was his past - he didn't hate his father, but his existence was holding Kylo Ren back from reaching his full potential, or so he believes. The principle is demonstrated earlier in the movie when he can't bring himself to kill Leia, but has no issue with the other TIE pilots blasting the bridge and (he thinks) killing her. He wants to free himself from the shackles of his parents, who cause him such internal conflict. Remove the source of the conflict and he believes he can move on to greater things. Of course, arguably his position is a bit naive, and his actions will actually cause him greater problems down the line.

Answer: As we saw in Episode 3, with Anakin Skywalker, turning to the Dark Side profoundly changes one's loyalty to friends and family. Anakin murdered children and nearly murdered his pregnant wife and his lifelong mentor. Kylo Ren seemed to follow the same path on the Dark Side, murdering his father.

Charles Austin Miller

Just pointing out that in Episode III Anakin did kill Padme, just not immediately. She gave birth to Luke and Leia and then died.

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