The Man From U.N.C.L.E.

The Man From U.N.C.L.E. (1964)

3 mistakes in The Deep Six Affair

The Deep Six Affair - S4-E14

Continuity mistake: The black Cadillac that pulls up to the guard house is a standard 60s Caddy with 4 doors, 2 bench seats and 4 passengers that we can see. But in the interior shot, there are 7 passengers sitting in a limo-sized Cadillac with a 3rd bench seat and 6 doors.

xx:xx:xx

Jean G

The Deep Six Affair - S4-E14

Continuity mistake: Morton turns on the gas in the vault by pushing the toggle switch on the wall downward. When he turns it off a few scenes later, he pushes the same switch down again.

xx:xx:xx

Jean G

The Deep Six Affair - S4-E14

Continuity mistake: Laura fires at the wall, leaving a bullet hole near Waverly's head. In the next shot, as they're effecting their escape, the bullet hole has disappeared.

xx:xx:xx

Jean G

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Quotes

Napoleon Solo: My name is Napoleon Solo. I'm an enforcement agent in Section Two here. That's operations and enforcement.
Illya Kuryakin: I am Illya Kuryakin. I am also an enforcement agent. Like my friend Napoleon, I go and I do whatever I am told to by our chief.
Alexander Waverly: Hmm? Oh, yes. Alexander Waverly. Number One in Section One. In charge of this, our New York headquarters. It's from here that I send these young men on their various missions.

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Trivia

"The Man From U.N.C.L.E.'s" original working title was "Solo," and its lead character was named for a spy with a minor role in one of Ian Fleming's early Bond novels. U.N.C.L.E. producer Norman Felton had a handshake agreement with Fleming to use the name and to develop "Solo" as a TV spy series. But the Bond film franchise had other ideas, reneged on the agreement on Fleming's behalf, and sued, forcing the title change. Felton prevailed only in retaining the character's name: Napoleon Solo.

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