The Man From U.N.C.L.E.

The Man From U.N.C.L.E. (1964)

2 mistakes in The Hula Doll Affair

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The Hula Doll Affair - S3-E22

Visible crew/equipment: When Illya, outside in front of the skyscraper office building, stands beside the cab talking on his communicator, the boom mike is visible over his head throughout the shot.

00:40:00

Jean G

The Hula Doll Affair - S3-E22

Visible crew/equipment: When Solo gets out of the cab in front of Thrush HQ, the taxi's windows catch a perfect reflection of the camera and a studio light as the driver pulls away.

00:14:50

Jean G

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Quotes

Napoleon Solo: My name is Napoleon Solo. I'm an enforcement agent in Section Two here. That's operations and enforcement.
Illya Kuryakin: I am Illya Kuryakin. I am also an enforcement agent. Like my friend Napoleon, I go and I do whatever I am told to by our chief.
Alexander Waverly: Hmm? Oh, yes. Alexander Waverly. Number One in Section One. In charge of this, our New York headquarters. It's from here that I send these young men on their various missions.

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Trivia

"The Man From U.N.C.L.E.'s" original working title was "Solo," and its lead character was named for a spy with a minor role in one of Ian Fleming's early Bond novels. U.N.C.L.E. producer Norman Felton had a handshake agreement with Fleming to use the name and to develop "Solo" as a TV spy series. But the Bond film franchise had other ideas, reneged on the agreement on Fleming's behalf, and sued, forcing the title change. Felton prevailed only in retaining the character's name: Napoleon Solo.

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