Star Trek

Star Trek (1966)

4 continuity mistakes in For the World is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky

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For the World is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky - S3-E8

Continuity mistake: After he falls unconscious onto the blue rug, McCoy's position relative to the rug's top edge keeps changing between shots.

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Jean G

For the World is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky - S3-E8

Continuity mistake: Kirk calls Scott to beam up, and lowers the communicator from his face as he looks at McCoy. In the next shot, he's holding it to his mouth once more. The shot changes one more time, and it's lowered again.

xx:xx:xx

Jean G

For the World is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky - S3-E8

Continuity mistake: Natira orders the landing party to kneel before the oracle. Spock does so about a foot-and-a-half to McCoy's left. As the shots change, Spock "jumps" to McCoy's immediate side, then back to his original position, etc.

xx:xx:xx

Jean G

For the World is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky - S3-E8

Continuity mistake: Kirk orders Sulu to match speed with the asteroid, but in the next external shot the asteroid is closing in on the ship.

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Quotes

Spock: Live long and prosper.

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Mistakes

When Kirk and Sulu enter the records room, they pick the lock. Later when they beam the officer back down, he enters the room without unlocking the door. The room should be locked since they beamed him down in the "past" erasing their having been on Earth and in the records room.

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Trivia

Gene Roddenberry created the transporter as an easier (and cheaper) way of getting Enterprise crew members onto a planet's surface, rather than landing the ship on the planet.

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