The Lost World: Jurassic Park

Plot hole: How did the men on the ship get killed? The bridge was intact and the T-Rex was still inside the cargo hold. [A raptor was meant to escape from the boat when it pulled in to the harbour, but they cut the scene from the film and now that bit doesn't appear to make any sense.] (01:40:55)

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Suggested correction: The idea of raptors being on the boat is a myth (likely spawned from a similar thing happening in the first book's ending). Though it's very poorly communicated and leaves many unanswered questions (the captain's hand the least of which), the dead hand holding the cargo hold controls implies that the T-Rex somehow got free, killed the crew, then was either lured or willingly returned to the hold where a dying worker closed the doors again.

Plot hole: Near the end of the movie, Peter Ludlow (the snivelling nephew of John Hammond who wants to create Jurassic Park in San Diego) is addressing company stockholders as they wait for the cargo ship to arrive. He says something to the effect of: "I'd like to thank you all for being intrepid enough to show up in the wee small hours of the morning." Those last six words, and the color of the sky make it seem like it is four or five in the morning at the latest. For that early, San Diego is a busy town. The buses are running, business men are out, video rental stores are open (and with plenty of customers), and generally a lot of people are out to run away from the T-Rex. I have to imagine that the mass of people running in terror (even though it is early in the morning) were put in as an homage to old monster movies. Same thing could be said for the Japanese business men. (01:38:10)

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Suggested correction: Ludlow already established that it's nighttime, not morning, when he says "tonight we christen Jurassic Park San Diego." He says this will happen in 30 minutes, so he's not talking about "tonight" being 13+ hours away. The sentence you're referring to was just the beginning of a different part of his speech which was interrupted and the "wee small hours" wasn't referring to that moment. He could have been talking about all the early mornings they put in in the past, or they all showed up at various times that morning and waited around till that moment. But it wasn't morning and he never said it was.

Bishop73

As well as after he addresses the people. A man walks into the shack to try to radio the ship. You can see a clock on the wall that says about 9:30. If it were A.M. it would be light out.

The Lost World: Jurassic Park mistake picture

Deliberate mistake: When the ship crashes into the dock, all of the scenes leading up to the crash and after it show a clear view across the harbor as we can see lights and land on the other side. It's not until the ship is about to crash that a thick and dense fog appears and disappears within a minute to mask the ship to create a more dramatic effect.

jerimiah

More mistakes in The Lost World: Jurassic Park

Roland Tembo: The Rex just fed, so he won't be hunting for a while.
Ian Malcolm: Just fed? I assume you're talking about Eddie? You might show a little more respect, the man saved our lives by giving his.
Roland Tembo: Then his problems are over. My point is, predators don't hunt when they're not hungry.
Nick Van Owen: Yeah, only humans do.
Roland Tembo: Oh, you're breaking my heart. Come on! Saddle up, let's get this moveable feast under way!

More quotes from The Lost World: Jurassic Park

Trivia: In the book, the character Nick does not exist. Instead, there is a genius professor that is constantly going into battles of intelligence with Ian Malcolm. Also in the book, Kelly has absolutely no relation with Ian at all, Sarah is the last to get to the island (unknowingly with the bad guys), the professor is the reason they go to the island, and, as far as I can remember, Hammond doesn't make any appearance in the book.

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Question: Malcolm asks Roland why he'd kill a T-Rex. Roland proceeds to tell a story about a guy that went up a mountain and came back barely alive, and when asked 'did he go up there to die', responded 'no, he went up there to live'. I sort of get the point of the story, but could somebody clarify it for me?

Answer: It's basically about facing one's own mortality. Many humans feel that they 'feel the most alive' when facing (and overcoming) dangerous situations, the more challenging, the better. Roland is a big game hunter, to him, the ultimate challenge would be to hunt the biggest and (presumably) most dangerous predator ever to exist. Facing the danger of the T. Rex would make him feel better and mightier than he had ever felt in his life.

Twotall

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