The Lost World: Jurassic Park

Four years after the failure of Jurassic Park on Isla Nublar, John Hammond (Richard Attenborough) reveals to Ian Malcolm (Jeff Goldblum) that there was another island, Isla Sorna ("Site B") on which dinosaurs were bred before being transported to Isla Nublar. Left alone since the disaster, the dinosaurs have flourished, and Hammond assembles a team to visit and document the area before it is exploited by others. When the team reaches the island, they soon discover the presence of another group of people. They however are not there for biological data but instead have something more sinister in mind. After a series of events, both groups become stranded when all their communication equipment is lost. It is then that the terror really begins as both groups scramble for their lives as they try to find a way off the island alive.

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Deliberate mistake: When the ship crashes into the dock, all of the scenes leading up to the crash and after it show a clear view across the harbor as we can see lights and land on the other side. It's not until the ship is about to crash that a thick and dense fog appears and disappears within a minute to mask the ship to create a more dramatic effect.

jerimiah

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Ian Malcom: Yes, ooo, ahh, it always starts out that way, and then comes all the running and screaming.

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Trivia: In the book, the character Nick does not exist. Instead, there is a genius professor that is constantly going into battles of intelligence with Ian Malcolm. Also in the book, Kelly has absolutely no relation with Ian at all, Sarah is the last to get to the island (unknowingly with the bad guys), the professor is the reason they go to the island, and, as far as I can remember, Hammond doesn't make any appearance in the book.

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Question: Malcolm asks Roland why he'd kill a T-Rex. Roland proceeds to tell a story about a guy that went up a mountain and came back barely alive, and when asked 'did he go up there to die', responded 'no, he went up there to live'. I sort of get the point of the story, but could somebody clarify it for me?

Answer: It's basically about facing one's own mortality. Many humans feel that they 'feel the most alive' when facing (and overcoming) dangerous situations, the more challenging, the better. Roland is a big game hunter, to him, the ultimate challenge would be to hunt the biggest and (presumably) most dangerous predator ever to exist. Facing the danger of the T. Rex would make him feel better and mightier than he had ever felt in his life.

Twotall

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