Ginger Snaps

New this week Trivia: Most movies film night scenes with a technique called "day for night," in which nighttime scenes are shot during the day, but are filmed and color-corrected in such a way as to make the footage look like it was filmed during the night. "Ginger Snaps" had the opposite problem. Several of the scenes set during the day actually had to be filmed at night due to scheduling issues. The production had to use massive floodlights to simulate daylight in the background. The lights were so powerful, they were easily visible to airplanes flying several miles above the filming location.

TedStixon

New this week Trivia: The opening credits, in which we see Ginger and Brigitte doing "mock suicides" in increasingly grisly fashion, was filmed in a young family's house in Canada... while the family - including a four-year-old child - was home. Various crew members had to spend the day playing with or otherwise distracting the child so she wouldn't see the gory scenes being filmed outside.

TedStixon

New this week Trivia: Katharine Isabelle and Emily Perkins, whom play Ginger and Brigitte, also played sisters in the family film "Another Cinderella Story," and both have also guest-starred on a number of common TV shows, including "Supernatural", albeit in different episodes.

TedStixon

New this week Trivia: Director John Fawcett refused to use CG on the werewolves, wanting to do the effects using old-fashioned prosthetics and animatronics as a tribute to classic werewolf films of the past.

TedStixon

Trivia: In the DVD's deleted scene sections, we see what happens to Pamela Fitzgerald in the Halloween party - she is confronted by two policemen and she shows them what she has in the clear plastic tupperware, which contains the fingers of Trina. The police arrest her on the spot and take her away, leaving Sam and Brigette to save Ginger.

Allister Cooper, 2011

Trivia: Due to the somewhat troubled production and limited release, the film didn't have much initial impact in domestic markets such as the US, although it gained a large cult-following overseas. This is likely as a result of the negative attention the film gained due to disasters such as the Columbine shooting, which caused some friction during production. It wasn't until a few years later when the film started airing on pay-channels like HBO or other specialty channels that it started to build an audience in domestic markets.

Trivia: Director John Fawcett desperately wanted screenwriter Karen Walton to write the script, but Walton was apprehensive for a long time. She was not a fan of horror films, and specifically their often-objectifying portrayal of women. Fawcett finally was able to convince her to write the script after explaining that he wanted the film to eschew cliches and portray the female characters as strong, defined people who wouldn't be objectified.

Trivia: The film had trouble finding funding as the Columbine school shooting had recently occurred early in pre-production, and many producers/investors/etc. wanted to distance themselves from productions involving teenagers in violent situations.

Trivia: Ironically and very coincidentally, Katharine Isabelle and Emily Perkins (who portray the lead characters, two sisters) were born in the same hospital five years apart, attended the same elementary and private schools as each other, and also worked out of the same talent agency. They also happened to audition on the exact same day. This was taken as a good sign, and they were both quickly hired.

Trivia: "Xena: Warrior Princess" star Lucy Lawless has an uncredited cameo as the voice heard over the PA system at the school. Furthermore, at one point, you can hear her voice paging "Samuel and Theodore" over the speakers, which is a reference to Sam Raimi (film director and co-creator of "Xena") and his brother Ted Raimi (who had co-starred with Lawless in "Xena").

Trivia: Emily Perkins (Bridgette) had her hair shaved off shortly before the start of filming, so she had to wear an (occasionally obvious) wig during the shoot.

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