The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers

Question: Maybe I missed something, but why didn't Gandalf notice that Sam was not there? He acts surprised when Aragorn says that Frodo didn't go to Mordor alone, Sam went with him. Yet, he has already seen Merry and Pippin, and Legolas, Gimli and Aragorn are with him, and he knows that Frodo went on alone, so where does he think Sam is? Please excuse me if I missed something.

Chosen answer: The movie makes it clear that Gandalf has lost some of his memory and his personality has changed. Gandalf actually did die and pass over to the "other side", as it were but was sent back to complete his task. However, he was sent back as a similar, but different entity. Gandalf the White does not have all the memories of Gandalf the Grey, at least at first. He doesn't even remember that he used to be called Gandalf the Grey until someone points this out to him. It is implied that Gandalf doesn't even remember Sam until Aragorn mentions him. Gandalf then searches his memories and remembers who Sam is and his eventual importance to Frodo's quest. When he finally remembers this, he is pleased that Sam went with Frodo, as he will play a crucial role near the end of the journey.

Question: When Pippin and Merry are with the orcs (or uruk-hai or whatever they're called) one of the orcs keeps insisting on eating them. What does he mean when he says, "Do they give good sport?" And then he does this weird thing with his tongue to which Merry looks at him oddly. I don't know what he meant by that.

xx:xx:xx

Zinka17

Chosen answer: "Do they give good sport" is simply a way of asking whether they're being kept alive to provide later entertainment; could they be used in some sort of organised hunt, could they serve as gladiatorial fodder in an arena fight, that sort of thing. The weird thing with the tongue really just seems to be a sort of odd tic, designed to emphasise his rather disgusting nature.

Tailkinker

Question: I'm just curious, but at Helm's Deep, when Legolas says to Gimli "Shall I get you a box to stand on?" or words to that effect, was that line improvised by Orlando Bloom or was it in the script?

Chosen answer: There's nothing to indicate that it wasn't in the script. It seems in line with much of the humour displayed throughout the trilogy, so was likely there from the start.

Tailkinker

Question: What was the point of bringing the Elves to the Battle of Helm's Deep? I don't mean in terms of the action of the film - I mean, why would the filmmakers add in something that is completely off the book? Legolas and Gimli frequently comment in the books that they wish their kinsmen would come to help them. Legolas then says that war is raging on their lands, and they will not come. Why have them come in the film?

padfootrocksmysocks

Chosen answer: It's to show that the other races aren't just sitting back and letting the race of Men fight the battles. They could, of course, simply have had Legolas and Gimli saying that their people are fighting elsewhere, much as the books do, but it's more interesting and emphatic to actually show that the elves are participating in the battle against evil, even if it represents a change.

Tailkinker

Question: In the opening scene, Frodo is dreaming about Gandalf's fall in Moria. So later on, when Gandalf is explaining to Aragorn, Gimli, and Legolas, how does he suddenly get from a water-filled cave miles below the surface of the earth (seen in Frodo's dream) to the top of a tower in the mountains (where he killed the Balrog once and for all)? I won't accept the explanation that Frodo's dream was inaccurate to real events or that he doesn't know what really happened, as I'm sure Peter Jackson used the dream as a way to partially explain what really happened to Gandalf in the books.

Chosen answer: Nope, Frodo's dream is spot-on - no need to use that excuse. Gandalf and the Balrog obviously both survive the fall, and Gandalf spends the next eight days chasing the Balrog through the deep caverns under Khazad-dum. Ultimately, the pair reach the Endless Stair, which connects the deep halls to the ruins of Durin's Tower on the peak of Zirakzigil, a mountain high above Moria. They head up the stair to the mountaintop where they fight their final battle, which lasts another two days before Gandalf finally triumphs.

Tailkinker

Question: This is an odd question, but have any historians commented on the battle scenes? Aside from the heroes' fights (such as Legolas, Gimili and Aragorn defeating hundreds of orcs by themselves), how true to life are the battles compared to real medieval sieges / battles?

Gary O'Reilly

Chosen answer: The LOTR is a heavy interpolation of different times, civilizations, religions, and cultures. Mainly, strict European and no Greek or Roman influence. There are bits and pieces of Medieval era, but then it can shoot to pre-Rome eras, and then shoot to strict religious material. It bounces back and forth all over the place, between pieces based on historical fact. For example, based on the armor, aspects, weapons, and fighting styles, the Elves would be the Gauls and Britonnic, around the time of Julius Caesar. The Dwarves are the Goths (Germany, Austria), but they also are the Nordic tribes ("vikings"). The Orcs bear strong similarity to the Vandals and Khazars, and the Mumakil are the Mauretanians (Moors). The Hobbits, Elves, Ents, Gandalf, are strong nods to the Druidism religion (Gandalf, the Elves, and Saruman are Druid priests, the Ents are supernatural beings). The Dwarves, dragons, trolls, giant spiders, orcs and Sauron show heavy nods to Asatru (Odin, Thor, Freya faith). Man seems somewhere in the middle, with more Medieval Christian hints here and there every so often, but very rarely. Besides the giant wolves, eagles, and such obvious fiction, the battles can go from very realistic to utter fiction. But they keep close enough to real history to be identifiable with who they are based on. The elves seem to follow a Gaul and Britonnic style, copper and gold armor, momentum-based swordplay, and a single-man fighting style. Many of the elves ring close to the Britonnic "kluddargos", high class swordsmen. The trolls seem similar to the very early Goths and Brits, as well as the Nordic "sky-clad" warriors who did at times use clubs and maces while stark naked and whipped up into a powerful "mind-over-body" state. The orcs show some resemblance to the Vandal forces, as well as the Thracians and many Celtic tribes (orcs are based off African American miners by J.R.R. Initially, and the whole story has rings of racism mixed with Christian elements, but take it for what it is. It mostly is a story copied from various myths, lore, and some events of Europe before Rome conquered the tribes Game of Thrones is closer to historical facts, and is not really racist at all, but also bounces around with interpolation as bad as LOTR). The Rohirrim bear strong resemblance to the Iberian horsemen who fought alongside Hannibal against Rome, as well as Viriatus; they were Celtic-like natives of Portugal (before Rome took it over and dominated the ethnic look of the region). The orc warg riders are akin to Nordic and Vandal horsemen, Dwarf combat is very close to actual Nordic and Gothic combat, lots of momentum, speed, heavy blows, and strength. The Elves have some resemblance to Gaulish and Britonnic high class warrior combat, but at swordplay and shields. The archery, on the other hand, is copied from Roman archers, Greek archers, and Sudanese (Nubian) archers (who could quickly whip from bow to sword in combat). The trolls use a style somewhere between fiction, but also with the real religion-hyped warriors of the Pechts, Vandals, Goths, viking tribes and Gauls: naked men armed who jumped into battle in a frenzy. The Uruk-hai berserker bears more resemblance to the Asatru religion "Úlfhéðnar", or Norse berserker. The Uruk-hai show resemblance to Goths mixed with European tribal warriors who sided with Byzantine. The Dunedain are very medieval Europeans, primarily England. So, to answer your question. Are the fights factual? sometimes, and not always the entire fight. Are they medieval fights? Again, sometimes, but usually they are mimicry of pieces of history or tribes and states during the Roman era. The closest to mimicking facts, even more than so-called fact based movies, is the game Skyrim. Skyrim can be very close to mimicking historical facts.

Question: The whole line of events leading to Gollum's capture by Faramir seems a bit out of place. 1. Where was Gollum when the hobbits were captured? 2. Wouldn't he be wondering where they are instead of fishing and singing carelessly? Did he know what had happened to them? 3. When Frodo finally appears, Gollum - suddenly - becomes suspicious. How so?

Chosen answer: 1. Gollum ran off as soon as he heard the Rangers coming. He did not want to get caught, as he figured the Rangers would kill him. 2. Gollum was certainly curious, but he still has to eat. He wouldn't pass up a pool full of fish. He also suspected that the Rangers had taken them. 3. Gollum is suspicious of Frodo showing up randomly. He didn't expect him to be there, and he found it strange that Frodo would want them to leave right at that moment.

Question: I am confused as to an event when the Rangers are in Osgiliath. Why one of the Nazgul (possibly the Witch King himself) would be within a few feet of the One Ring, and allow himself to be driven off by an arrow shot into the Fell Beast. After seeing the One Ring, he flew off....I doubt that Sauron would have understood.

scwilliam

Chosen answer: Well, for one thing, he's most likely having a hard time controlling the arrow-shot Fell Beast. Secondly, there's no evidence that he positively identified the Ring. He saw a hobbit, which he knows are of interest, but, as Sam intercepts Frodo before he puts the Ring on, has no way of knowing that he actually held the Ring itself. Given the level of resistance on the ground, it doesn't make good tactical sense to try and land the annoyed Fell Beast to chase after a hobbit.

Tailkinker

Question: What is the real name of the flower used as Simbelmyne?

Chosen answer: According to Peter Jackson's commentary on the EE, they actually made the Simbelmyna at Weta.

Ioreth

Question: After Gimli finds Merry's knife sheath among the dead orcs, Legolas bows and says a few words in Elvish. What are they and what do they mean?

Chosen answer: "Hiro hyn hîdh ab 'wanath." ("May they find peace in death").

Sierra1

Question: When Saruman declares war, why does Grima cry? He's a bad guy siding with Saruman.

Chosen answer: The tear rolling down his cheek is the result of his overwhelming awe at the sheer size of Saruman's army.

Phixius

Question: After the healing of Theoden from the spell of Saruman, Why didn't Aragorn Let Theoden kill Grima?

DFirst1

Chosen answer: Théoden was intent on killing Grima out of revenge for what he had done. Since Aragorn is a very noble man, he would have felt that Théoden killing Grima for that reason would not have been a noble decision, especially for a king, to make.

Casual Person

Question: When it first shows the orcs carrying Pippin and Merry, Pippin shows evident concern for Merry and asks, "What about your heart?" To which Merry replies, "It was just an act. See? Fooled you too." I'm just curious as to what makes Pippin think that anything is wrong with Merry's heart. It never stated or showed anything about Pippin or Merry until this scene, and the last we see of them in FOTR is of them being carried away by the orcs, completely conscious and unharmed. However, while I have the extended version of TTT and ROTK, I only have the theatrical version of FOTR, so I was wondering if this was ever mentioned in a scene during it.

Zinka17

Chosen answer: You misheard, I'm afraid. Pippin says "You're hurt" not "Your heart".

Tailkinker

Question: When Frodo first calls Gollum "Smeagol", what is it that Gollum says in between Frodo's lines? They sound like riddles, or are they possibly pieces of songs from the books? If so, what songs are they and where are they found within the books?

Chosen answer: "Cold be heart and hand and bone/Cold be travellers far from home/They do not see what lies ahead/When sun has failed and moon is dead." I believe it is based on a spell cast on the four hobbits by the Barrow-Wight, in the book "The Fellowship of the Ring."

Question: Gandalf explains in this movie how he survives fighting that fire creature from the 1st movie. But I am confused here. They show in flashbacks him and the fire creature falling down the crevice and landing in a pool of water. Next scene they are on the top of the mountain fighting in snow. How did they get from the pool of water to the mountain of snow?

SAZOO1975

Chosen answer: It was a long fight lasting many days, after they fell, the Balrog climbed all the way to the peaks of the mountains, and Gandalf followed it.

pross79

Question: After Aragorn goes over the cliff during the warg attack, why don't Gimli and Legolas go down to look for him? Even if they thought it would be impossible for him to have survived, how could they live with not having made sure? Yes, more wargs would be coming soon, but surely these two brave warriors would not allow that to prevent them from possibly saving Aragorn's life.

Chosen answer: They simply don't think he could have survived. Even if he did, they could hardly take the time to search for what could be miles downriver. Aragorn would want to make sure that the people of Rohan reached safety, so that's what they do, accompany the column to Helm's Deep, rather than abandon them in the face of possible further attacks. Also, King Theoden had given orders to leave the dead, and assuming that Aragon could not have survived such a fall, they were being ordered to leave him.

Tailkinker

Question: When Legolas says "Aragorn, something's out there!" Why does he speak in Elvish? Gimli cannot speak Elvish and there is no reason for Legolas to not want Gimli to hear what he is saying.

Blibbetyblip

Chosen answer: Legolas was speaking in Elvish so that the whoever or whatever was out there would not understand. It is more likely "it" would understand if Legolas were to speak in english and therefore make their surprise counter-attack void.

XIII

Question: Who or what is Helm and what is its deep?

Blibbetyblip

Chosen answer: Helm Hammerhand was the ninth King of Rohan who used the caves and their accompanying fortifications (built many centuries earlier by the Gondorians) as refuge during a war against the Dunlendings. The caves, and the valley leading to them, were named Helm's Deep as a tribute.

Tailkinker

Question: What is the reason for Aragorn falling off the cliff? Most people who see this movie would at least know that the next installment is called "Return of the King" so they would know that Aragorn cannot die until the third movie. I wondered whether it was just a plot device so that Aragorn could see the army of Uruk-Hai later and report their numbers to Theoden.

Blibbetyblip

Chosen answer: You're quite right in that, no, I doubt anybody seriously would have thought that Aragorn was going to die, but the scene functions as a way of showing the peril that the characters are facing, plus, as you say, it allowed Aragorn to report on the approaching enemy force, putting the main characters in the thick of the action rather than having a nameless scout character make the report. Plus it also allows them to reunite Aragorn with Brego the horse.

Tailkinker

Question: Why does the Eye of Sauron look so different in this movie? In 'Fellowship', it's a round eye with a thin slit but in this movie it is more oval shaped and has a considerably wider slit.

Blibbetyblip

Chosen answer: The Eye gradually changes throughout the films, getting noticeably larger and more dynamic - a sign of Sauron's growing power.

Tailkinker

Question: Is Sam's line "By rights we shouldn't even be here," a reference to the fact that Frodo and Sam never go to Osgiliath in the books?

Blibbetyblip

Chosen answer: No. Despite various attempts to read that as some tacit admission of wrong-doing on the part of the scriptwriters, it doesn't mean anything of the sort. What Sam means is that, if things were going right in the world, he and Frodo would be living a peaceful life in the Shire, not dodging Nazguls and arrows in the ruins of Osgiliath.

Tailkinker

Question: I am confused about the battle of Osgiliath. Are there orcs attacking the city, or just the Nazgul? Also, how many Nazgul are there (just the one we see or more)? When Faramir shows Frodo the way out through the sewers (Extended DVD) have the Gondorians won the battle or is it still going? And last of all, is the battle of Osgiliath in the third movie (where the orcs are coming in on rafts) a continuation of this battle, or are the orcs seen in the third movie reinforcements?

Blibbetyblip

Chosen answer: Osgiliath is under attack from an army consisting mainly of Orcs, but with at least one member (probably more) of the nine Nazgul operating from time to time in the air. In the final film, Osgiliath is still under siege, but the newcomers on the rafts represent major reinforcements, more than enough to take the city before continuing on to Minas Tirith. At this point, Sauron has committed to a major offensive, so all nine Nazgul are in the fray along with his huge army of Orcs, Trolls, Mumakil and so on.

Tailkinker

Question: What is the name of the music heard when Aragorn, Legolas and Gimli are following Merry and Pippin in the wide open plains at the beginning?

Chosen answer: On the soundtrack, the song is called "The Uruk-hai". Track 5 on the soundtrack.

Question: How did Frodo know that Gollum's hobbit name was Smeagol?

guy fenocchi

Chosen answer: Gandalf told him - a scene seen in the Extended Edition of the Fellowship of the Ring.

Tailkinker

Question: I never understood why the Elf contingent arriving at Helm's Deep was led by Haldir, the marchwarden for Galadiel and Lothlorien. But he brought greetings from Elrond of Rivendell, who wasn't really the equal of Galadriel. Did Rivendell have troops that Lothlorien didn't? And yet, there were plenty of armed Elves as the Fellowsip arrived in Lothlorien in FotR.

scwilliam

Chosen answer: Haldir brings the message from Elrond, who is very much Galadriel's equal, that they fight in honour of the earlier alliance - Elrond fought in that alliance, while Galadriel didn't, so it makes sense that the message would be from him. The elven forces have been sent from Lorien for the simple reason that it's much closer to Rohan - they also don't have to cross the Misty Mountains, which would be a serious problem for any group sent from Rivendell.

Tailkinker

Question: What is the significance of Saruman talking at the same time as Gandalf, in the scene where Aragorn, Legolas and Gimli find Gandalf in Fangorn Forest?

Chosen answer: This was just a little deceit by Peter Jackson to make the audience believe the "White Wizard" was Saruman for a few more seconds.

Bob Blumenfeld

Question: In an earlier question someone asked about Brego and said it was Eomund's horse. Eowyn says that it was her cousin's horse. I thought Theodred was her cousin not Eomund. Is that true?

Chosen answer: You're correct - Theodred, who rode Brego before his death, is Eowyn's cousin. Eomund is her late father, who married Theodwyn, King Theoden's sister.

Tailkinker

Question: I think that it was excluded from the UK Extended DVD, but does anyone know where I can find 'Gollum's Acceptance Speech' on the web? It was the awards ceremony for the MTV Movie awards.

Chosen answer: http://www.pinwire.com/downloads-file-9.html. Failing that, a Google search ought to turn it up.

Tailkinker

Question: I was wondering if anyone knew where I could find the Gollum's song video clip, NOT the one with Two Towers clips in it, there's another proper video clip with a guy and a girl running away from a man with a knife which I found once by chance and can't find it anymore. Does anyone have a link to it?

Chosen answer: I think I found it. Here's the link: http://www.drawntothefire.com/general.html.

Question: Where can I find the scene where Gimli is telling Legolas the point of a drinking game? Also why does wood elves enjoy wine but Legolas doesn't?

Chosen answer: The drinking game scene is in the extended version of the Return of the King. As for Legolas not enjoying wine despite other wood elves doing so, he just doesn't like it; not everyone has the same tastes.

Tailkinker

Question: What is Gollum? I thought he was supposed to have once been a hobbit but what happened to him?

Chosen answer: He was indeed a hobbit, probably of the Stoor sub-race. After the finding of the Ring, he fell under its influence and he took it. The Ring kept him alive, prolonging his life far beyond the norm (he's around 500 years old at the time of the films). His physical change is related to the Ring - the precise mechanism is unclear, but it's most likely due to repeated exposure to the wraithworld that parallels our own; wearers of the Ring are transported at least partially into that world, rendering them invisible in ours. The same process happened with the kings who became the Nazgul.

Tailkinker

Question: On the way to Helm's Deep, Theoden is riding Snowmane. After the battle with the Wargs and the company finally arrives inside the great fortress, Theoden dismounts off of a brown horse...where did Snowmane go?

Chosen answer: Snowmane was presumably either killed during the battle against the Wargs and their riders, or injured to the extent that Theoden didn't want to risk riding him.

Tailkinker

Question: In the extra features on the DVD, Peter Jackson states that they had to use the rocky landscape for the plains of Rohan because New Zealand doesn't have any plains. What then is the area in front of Minas Tirith? It seems like very extensive plains. Is it all effects?

Chosen answer: Some of it is CG, but some of it is real plains, trouble is they couldn't use the same plains for Gondor and Rohan, they wouldn't be distinguishable enough from each other.

Question: What are the words to the chant that Eowyn does at Eomund's funeral? Also, can anyone translate this into English for me?

Chosen answer: "Bealocweal hafath freone frecon forth osended. Giedd sculon singa gleomenn sorgiende on Meduselde." "An evil death has set forth the noble warrior. A song sorrowing minstrels shall sing in Meduseld."

Super Grover

Question: Why are Merry and Pippin not surprised to see Gandalf when the company approaches Isengard? It never says that they spoke to Treebeard about him and they are not drunk enough to completely forget that they thought Gandalf was dead.

Chosen answer: They've already seen him alive, shortly after meeting Treebeard for the first time - Treebeard takes them to see 'the white wizard' and we see the pair being dropped in front of somebody wearing white. We're supposed to assume, at the time, that it's Saruman, but, as is revealed, it's actually Gandalf.

Tailkinker

Question: Why is Brego, Eomund's horse, upset in the scene where Aragorn first meets him? Is he upset because Eomund is dead?

Chosen answer: That would seem like a pretty plausible answer, yes. Brego's been in the middle of what was close to a massacre, with men (including his master) and presumably other horses cut down around him - enough to upset anyone.

Tailkinker

Question: What is Sam's line at the end of the movie just before Frodo asks "what are we holding onto?" It was something about "How can the world go back to the way it was . . ." or something. Please list THE ENTIRE LINE. Thanks.

Chosen answer: I know. It's all wrong. By rights we shouldn't even be here. But we are. It's like in the great stories, Mr. Frodo. The ones that really mattered. Full of darkness and danger they were. And sometimes you didn't want to know the end. Because how could the end be happy? How could the world go back to the way it was when so much bad had happened. But in the end, it's only a passing thing, this shadow. Even darkness must pass. A new day will come. And when the sun shines it will shine out the clearer. Those were the stories that stayed with you. That meant something. Even if you were too small to understand why. But I think, Mr. Frodo, I do understand. I know now. Folk in those stories had lots of chances of turning back only they didn't. Because they were holding on to something.

Myridon

Question: Theoden says 'where was Gondor when the West Wall fell?' What is the West Wall and where is it?

Chosen answer: He doesn't say "the west Wall", he says "Westfold", i.e., the Western part of Rohan, where Saruman's forces struck first.

Twotall

Question: At the beginning, when Frodo and Sam capture Gollum, when they have the rope around his neck, Gollum screams "It burns us! It freezes!" What does he mean by that? Is the rope just annoying him, or is it actually causing him some sort of pain? I mean, it can't be choking him because the rope isn't tight around his neck. What does the book say about this?

rstill

Chosen answer: The rope is elven made, it seems that anything the elves made causes him pain. In the extended edition, he almost chokes when he tries to eat Elven lembas bread. Sort of a metaphor that he's so foul that even the fair can harm him rather than help him.

RJR99SS

Question: I've heard that the short film that Sean Astin directed in Wellington would be included on the Two Towers DVD. I know it's on the regular version, but I have the extended edition and I haven't been able to find it. Is it an easter egg, or did they just not include it?

Chosen answer: It's only on the theatrical version.

Tailkinker

Question: When the Rohirrum surround Legolas, Gimli, and Aragorn, Eomer gets offended when Gimli says, "Give me your line, horsemaster, and I'll give ya mine." In the book, Gimli says that Eomer has little wit which causes him to reply by saying the bit about Gimli's height. Why didn't Peter Jackson leave that line in. It would have made much more sense as to why Eomer lost his temper.

Chosen answer: It's actually 'give me your name, horsemaster...' but that's beside the point... The 'little wit' comment was made as a direct result of Eomer being dismissive of Galadriel, and Gimli firing up in her defence ('you speak evil of that which is fair beyond reach of your thought, and only little wit can excuse you') - for reasons of simplicity, and not making the scene overlong and complicated, PJ & co decided to have the tension between Gimli and Eomer based simply on pride.

STP

Question: In the Warg battle, Aragorn accidentally falls over a cliff and doesn't return to Helm's Deep until much later, when everyone believes he is dead. This doesn't occur in the book (in fact, neither does the Warg battle, but I can see why the battle was added, to spruce up an otherwise boring scene). Can anyone explain what benefit Aragorn's accident had to the storyline?

Chosen answer: This was done to add to the tension; in part for the audience, but in larger part for the characters. As Peter Jackson said, when asked about this issue, those who have read the books know what happens to Aragorn throughout the story, and will not think for a second that he truly has perished in the river, but for some viewers coming new to the whole thing, this adds some tension for them... more importantly, though, we see the reactions of the characters; they grieve for Aragorn as if they will not see him again, and even though we know otherwise - perhaps, in part, beCAUSE we know otherwise - we are sympathetic to that. It also serves to highlight the friendship, the true fellowship, that existed amongst them. Finally, PJ also said that he didn't want the whole journey to seem too easy; the heroes just wading through every battle felling enemies and not getting a scratch themselves; he wanted to show that they were vulnerable.

STP

Question: Do any elves (obviously apart from Legolas) survive the battle for Helm's Deep?

Chosen answer: During the ride forth, there's what appears to be another elf in the group, only really visible in the shot on the causeway - originally, this was Arwen, but there's been some work done to alter her - still looks like an elf, though. Other than that, it's not specifically shown, but there were certainly other survivors who remained behind, presumably to hold off the Uruk-Hai while the woman and children escaped into the mountains. It seems very likely that there would have been some elves among that number.

Tailkinker

Question: Forgive me for being stupid, but what's the point about Sam's salt box in the extended cut? Was it originally going to be Galadriel's gift to Sam (he receives one in the book) and then they changed it? That part seems a little useless to me as it is.

Chosen answer: It's to show that he's still holding on to something from home, that he still has hope for their mission. Peter Jackson mentions this on the commentary. He was always intended to get rope from Galadriel.

Nick N.

Question: Why doesn't Faramir just take the ring from Frodo? It would have been a lot easier.

Chosen answer: Faramir's personality is completely different from Boromir's. It would not be in his nature to seize it by himself.

scwilliam

Question: What is the relationship between Grima Wormtongue and Saruman? Also, what being does Grima represent and why is he poisoning Theoden's mind? Is he the same race as Saruman and Gandalf?

megamii

Chosen answer: Grima is human - he acts as Saruman's agent in Theoden's court. He keeps Theoden weak (using what appears to be a combination of drugs and Saruman's sorcery) to make it easier for Saruman to influence him, and therefore effectively neuter the military power of Rohan.

Tailkinker

Question: They appear entering the Black Gates in the film, but what happened to the Men of Rhun (Easterlings) after this? They did not appear again. Also, what happened to the Wildmen after their meeting with Saruman?

megamii

Chosen answer: The Easterlings were most likely used in one of Sauron's other assaults, on Lorien or the dwarven kingdom of Erebor in the north. They also appear in the third movie, charging into Minas Tirith after the trolls. As for the Wildmen, Saruman seems to consider them to be expendable troops - sending them into Rohan to destroy villages, crops and so forth. Most likely they would have fallen at the hands of Rohirrim troops - they would, however, have taken some of those warriors with them, weakening Rohan as a whole for the later Uruk-Hai assault.

Tailkinker

Question: I know the first film had dialogue references to chapters of the book, such as "A Shortcut to Mushrooms" and "A Long Expected Party". Did this film have any such references?

Chosen answer: Not really, no. The chapter titles of The Two Towers tend to be relatively factual, like "Helm's Deep", which, while obviously said during the film, can hardly be considered a specific reference to the chapter title. The closest is probably Aragorn calling out "Riders of Rohan" when they encounter them on the plains - there is a chapter with this title (adding "The" to the beginning).

Tailkinker

Question: Forgive my ignorance, but what does Aragorn say after Legolas returns the Evenstar pendant?

Chosen answer: He says "Hannon le" - it means "Thank you".

Tailkinker

Question: I've got one question about Legolas' infamous jump on to the horse during the wolf-attack. Is it even possible to do something like that? How did they shoot that scene?

Chosen answer: It's a computer-generated Legolas. While experienced riders are capable of some pretty amazing stuff, I'd imagine that what's seen would be impossible to do in reality - certainly not without throwing the horse off a lot more than seen here. But then, Legolas is an elf, so all bets are off on what he's capable of doing.

Tailkinker

Question: Could someone give me the following statistics about the Battle For Helm's Deep? How many Rohan warriors were guarding the Hornburg? How many elves were present (both behind and on top of the Deeping Wall)? How many Rohirrim came with Gandalf? How many Huorns finished off the Uruk-hai?

Chosen answer: There are no particularly precise figures anywhere - all that's available would be educated guesses based on watching the films, and you'd be just as qualified to do that as anybody.

Tailkinker

Question: At the end of Fellowship, we seen that Boromir's body (along with his sword and shield) was sent over the Falls of Rauros on a boat and if you look closely will see that the boat toppled forward. Yet in Two Towers, as Faramir sees the boat sail by, the body appears to be unharmed (as well as the sword and shield). Shouldn't the plunge have scattered his weapons as well as the boat and the corpse?

Chosen answer: There is a supernatural element to Faramir seeing his brother's body; even the way it is filmed indicates this. The implication is that the Elven power bound up in the boat, and perhaps some other greater power, safeguarded Boromir; there is also the inference that what Faramir saw was a vision, and not literal reality; there are elements of legend in it, too. From the book: 'He floated by them, and slowly his boat departed... and then suddenly it vanished... the River had taken Boromir son of Denethor... But in Gondor of after-days it long was said that the elven-boat rode the falls and the foaming pool, and bore him down through Osgiliath, and past the many mouths of Anduin, out into the Great Sea at night under the stars.'

STP

Question: When the Nazgúl first arrives in Osgiliath, Frodo cannot hear anything. Can anyone tell me what Sam says while it goes all quiet?

Chosen answer: I think it's something like "Hang on Mr. Frodo" or "Hold on Mr. Frodo".

Question: Apart from Gandalf, the Rohirrim and the Huorns, who survived the initial stages of the Battle Of The Hornburg?

Chosen answer: As Helm's Deep doesn't really have initial stages, as such, and, even if it did, none of those you mention would have been there, as they arrive at the very end, I'll assume that the question is really "who survived the Battle of the Hornburg?" The survivors obviously include Aragorn, Gimli, Legolas and Theoden. Gamling, Theoden's right-hand man also survives. Other than that, it seems fair to say that a number of the other human and elven defenders would have lived through the battle - some are seen to ride forth with Theoden, others presumably remained behind in the fortress. In addition, there are all those women (including Eowyn) and children who hid in the caves behind the fortress.

Tailkinker

Question: Where did Sam get the potatoes for the "coney stew"? Not having enough food is a big issues for the hobbits yet it seems he has more than enough ingredients to make a stew with the rabbits that Gollum brings to him. And, if he just dug up the potatoes, why is running out of lembas bread such a tragedy?

Nick N.

Chosen answer: Sam didn't "get" them anywhere at all. He says, "What we need now is a few good taters," implying that he wishes he had some - but he doesn't.

Phil C.

Question: Why is Arwen fighting in the battle of Helms Deep? Even if it is a mistake presumably there was some reason for her to be there, like a story line that didn't get included in the movie. Does anyone know if this is true?

Chosen answer: Efforts have been made during the trilogy to beef up Arwen's role in events - using her to bring Frodo to Rivendell in the first film being one of them (replacing Glorfindel in the book). Having her at Helm's Deep was another way of doing that, and Liv Tyler was present at the filming of Helm's Deep. Ultimately, the decision was made to cut her out of that sequence, and the battle was edited to exclude her, with the exception of one brief shot listed as a mistake.

Tailkinker

Question: In the extended version, if Faramir is so worried that Gollum will prevent Frodo from completing his quest, then why doesn't he kill him? I know that Frodo 'has to believe he can come back' and so on, but don't you think it is vital Frodo's journey to save the world is made as safe as possible?

Chosen answer: Gollum is the only one who can guide Frodo to the stairs and through the tunnels above it, as he is the only one to have gotten into Mordor that way. And besides, Gollum is under Frodo's protection, and if Faramir had willingly hurt someone in the company of a guest, his and Gondor's honor would be ruined. This may not seem like much in our time and place, but in Middle Earth it matters a lot.

Twotall

Question: What exactly is the "infamous" Wilhelm scream?

Chosen answer: A series of short painful screams performed by an actor were recorded for the film "Distant Drums." The recording was archived into the studio's sound effects library and it was used in many of their films since. "Star Wars" Sound Designer Ben Burtt tracked down the scream recording. Ben has adopted the scream as sort of a personal sound signature, and has included it in many of the films he has worked on. Since then it has grown to be something of an "in-joke" in Hollywood among sound designers, who like to see how many films they can fit it into. A list of "Wilhelms" and where they appear can be found at http://www.hollywoodlostandfound.net/wilhelm.html.

rabid anarchist

Question: What type of horse did they use to play Brego?

Chosen answer: Brego's real name is Uraeus. He is a warmblood stallion, a former FEI dressage horse, and is currently owned by Viggo Mortensen.

Question: In the extended version, Aragorn calms Brego down by speaking Elvish to him. What does he say in Elvish, and is there a translation?

Chosen answer: "Man le trasta, Brego? Man cenich?" Which means, "What troubles you, Brego? What did you see?" This is why he says to Eowyn that Brego has seen enough war, and to set Brego free.

Super Grover

Question: There are many scenes where the film is "flipped". (You can usually tell because the brooch on the Elven cloaks is reversed.) Is there a reason why the brooch on Samwise's cloak is the reverse of everyone else's throughout the films?

Laurie Brown

Chosen answer: It is true to say that flipped shots are obvious for this "brooch" reason, but there is a much better explanation if Samwise's is like it for the whole film. It could be that the actor who plays him is left handed and therefore unlike the majority of the cast, he would put his on the other way round. Not a definitive answer, but a practical one.

David Mercier

Question: Why doesn't Legolas ever run out of arrows throughout the movie?

Chosen answer: After battles Legolas picks up the enemies' arrows (if they used any). I believe that he also makes his own (though we don't seem him do either of the 2 things).

bessytheevilcow

Question: Can anyone tell me where I can find the script for the extended Two Towers? I can't find it anywhere.

Chosen answer: They have it at http://www.stupidring.com/tttscript/ On the left side of the screen just click on Special Extended Edition at the bottom.

Question: When the film makers deviate from the book there is often an acknowledgement in some minor detail in the film, for example, Sam's line in Osgiliath, "By rights we shouldn't even be here", is acknowledging that they never go to Osgiliath in the book. Is there anything like that, in any of the trilogy, to acknowledge that the makers / writers left out Tom Bombadil?

Chosen answer: There's a slight reference in the Extended Edition of the Two Towers. When Merry and Pippin are being "eaten" by the tree in the quiet dell of Fangorn Forest, Treebeard arrives and makes the tree let them go. The words he speaks, "Away with you! You should not be waking! Eat earth! Dig deep! Drink water! Go to sleep!" were spoken by Tom Bombadil in the book edition of "The Fellowship of the Ring", to make Old Man Willow release the hobbits.

Phil C.

Question: A friend of mine has just told me that there is a famous actress who has a cameo as an Elf in this movie, but he won't tell me who it is. Apparently, I have to find out for myself. Is he just being deliberately annoying, or does someone out there know if this is true and who he is talking about?

Chosen answer: If this is true, then it's not mentioned anywhere in the commentaries or other additional materials on the Extended DVD. Your friend may just be being annoying.

Tailkinker

Question: What is the title of the very fast paced song in the trailer?

Chosen answer: It's the beautiful theme of Requiem for a Dream, composed by Clint Mansell.

cinecena

Question: What happens to Haldir, right before he dies? I've watched it several times, but still can't figure it out.

Chosen answer: The first stab Haldir gets in his side, when two orcs come at him at once. The second blow, from what we can see, Haldir receives from above by an orc sword. The orc swings it downward, and from the jerk of Haldir's head, it apparently cleaves downward through the back of his skull, or his neck. Either way, it's enough to sever a vertebrae (or whatever elves have). Peter Jackson was gracious enough not to show it.

Question: Often when Gollum is in the middle of a sentence, he will cough the words "Gollum, Gollum". Why is that? It does that in the book too but I don't understand it.

Chosen answer: It is not known exactly why he makes this noise only that it started after he recieved the ring. Since any people that knew him are now dead or have forgotten his name, the sound he makes (gollum,gollum) is what people now call him.

bessytheevilcow

Question: Trolls usually turn to stone if they are exposed to daylight (like in the Hobbit). How is it then that the trolls that were opening and closing the Black Gate (when Sam and Frodo wanted to try to sneak in after the foreign army) weren't turned to stone and it was the middle of the day?

Chosen answer: It was so cloudy that not enough sun came through. Or it could be that the Trolls were of Sauron's new Troll-breed, Olog-Hai, who could withstand direct sunlight

Question: When Aragon and the others were a day's journey behind the Uruk-hai in the canyon, and one of the Uruk-hai was able to smell "man-flesh", so how is it that the Riders of Rohan were able to sneak up on the Uruk-hai while they are camped by the forest and the Uruk-hai not smell them?

Chosen answer: We don't know that they didn't smell them. We just know that the riders found the camp and that there was a fight. If you read the books, it says that they knew the riders were coming, but there was no way they could outrun them on the plain; they headed for Fangorn Forest, hoping they wouldn't follow, but the riders caught up with them just outside of it. Obviously, some things are skipped in the movie, so it's a little less fluid. Check out The Two Towers, ch. The Uruk-Hai, about 1/2 way into the chapter.

jle

Question: I was watching The Two Towers on DVD the other day and I am sure that I saw John Rhys Davies as one of the villagers that are helping to defend Helm's Deep. Is this true? It's not the spear-throwing Peter Jackson cameo - this character lifts a rock (or something) above his head and lets out a very John-like roar. Blink and you'll miss it.

Scrappy

Chosen answer: At what time? Peter Jackson's cameo (spear) is at 1:10:07 and producer Barry Osborne's (rock) is at 1:10:17. I couldn't spot another 'lift something over head and shout' shot.

jle

Question: Gandalf says "three hundred of the lives of men.... etc." does he mean he is that old? I have not read the book, but plan to.

Sol Parker

Chosen answer: "Three hundred lives of Men I've walked this earth, and, now, I have no time." That is an implication of his age. This isn't, though, referring to how long he's been walking the earth as the wizard Gandalf. From the book: "Olorin I was in the days of my youth in the West", Gandalf came to Middle-Earth about a thousand years into the third age, yet he was a Maia, and is much older. He has only been in human form for about 2000 years.

cullothiel

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Quotes

Gimli: Oh come on, we can take 'em.
Aragorn: It's a long way.
Gimli: Toss me.
Aragorn: What?
Gimli: I cannot jump the distance you'll have to toss me!...don't tell the elf.
Aragorn: Not a word.

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Mistakes

Gimli is lying with his face under the water, after jumping off the Deeping Wall and landing on the Uruk-hai. In the close-up, the right arm that grabs Gimli's shoulder to help him out of the water is Legolas' right arm. Yet, in the wide shot, suddenly it is Aragorn helping Gimli to his feet, not Legolas.

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Trivia

John Rhys-Davies is missing the end of his middle finger on his left hand due to a farming accident as a child. The make-up artists made artificial, gelatin fingertips for him to wear in the movies. Davies one day, cut the tip in half, put 'blood' in it and closed it up. He went over to Peter Jackson (unaware of the gelatin tip) and said, "Boss, I've had an accident, look what happened". Jackson saw a small cut, but Davies bent the tip back and it split open, gushing. Nice.

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