Get Carter

Visible crew/equipment: When Carter meets with Glenda on the bridge, a tracking shot of Carter trying to get away from the other thugs makes hard shadows of the camera on every pillar it moves by. (01:22:00)

Visible crew/equipment: In the scene where Carter is cornering Thorpie in the men's cloakroom, watch the tracking shot as he's checking the stalls. The shadow of the camera crew is plainly visible on the wall beside him.

Visible crew/equipment: Carter pushes Brumby off the high building and he lands on a car below. As the car door is opened to rescue the little girl inside the car camera lights are reflected in the car window.

eric 64

Continuity mistake: When Carter is shot at the very end of the film, his shot gun falls clear of his body. In the following shot as the sea washes around his body, his hand is resting on the gun.

More mistakes in Get Carter

Eric: So, what're you doing then? On your holidays?
Jack Carter: No, I'm visiting relatives.
Eric: Oh, that's nice.
Jack Carter: It would be... if they were still living.

More quotes from Get Carter

Trivia: Michael Caine's character was called Jack Carter. According to the film's director, Mike Hodges, the stand-in used for Michael Caine during the filming actually was a guy named...Jack Carter

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Question: Why does Jack insist that his pint of bitter be in a THIN glass? I've tried doing some Google research on the question and haven't come up with a satisfactory answer. One person says it's a Northerners vs Southerners custom, one says it's in case he needs to use the glass as a weapon, another says he's just being a jerk to the barman as he'd already started to pull it, and a fourth says it's just because that's how Carter ordered it in the novel. Nobody seems to know for certain, though. I'm hoping that maybe someone's seen an interview with Michael Caine or Ted Lewis and has the real answer.

Captain Defenestrator

Answer: It's a show of sophistication. Working class men in pubs and clubs (north, south, and London) typically drank from beer mugs. By insisting on a thin glass Jack is making a public display, of socially distancing himself from the average beer drinking peers, showing he has refined himself from his working class roots.

Chosen answer: Its the northerners V southerners for that time period - northerners drank from jugs (the pint glass with the handle) and southerners drank from tall pint glasses that are more commonly used today. Jack, being from London, wanted it in a tall glass.

Answer: Absolutely not. This is gangster. Carter knows if he has a thin straight glass he can tap it on the bar and he has a makeshift weapon. You can't do that with a dimpled 'glass' with a handle, which is a mug by the way.

Answer: Jugs can survive being chipped on the rim and difficult to spot, any chip on a thin glass would produce an obvious crack and not be used, so you could cut your mouth on a chipped jug. Nothing to do with class, just thickness of glass.

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